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[Cost benefit of detection and treatment patients with tuberculosis in Ivanovo region, Russian Federation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204918
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1998;(3):9-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
A G Khomenko
V V Punga
L N Rybka
T A Grishina
D B Migliori
M. Ambrosetti
M. Ravilyone
M. Grzemska
M B Stoiunin
I D Danilova
L V Filippova
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1998;(3):9-13
Date
1998
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Hospital Costs
Humans
Retrospective Studies
Russia
Tuberculosis - diagnosis - economics - therapy
Abstract
To execute the tuberculosis control programme in the Ivanovo Region, the authors calculated the cost of detection of a tuberculosis case at patients' referrals to a therapeutical-and-prophylactic institution for medical aid and during prophylactic X-ray fluographic examinations and the cost of tuberculosis cure while treating the patient at a hospital in the intensive treatment phase (2-3 months) and in the outpatient setting or at a day hospital by the intermittent method in the continued treatment phase. The costs calculated were compared with those obtained by early approaches. The cost of detection of a tuberculosis case was 1580.8 for referrals in 1996 and 4000 for X-ray fluographic prophylactic examinations. The costs of hospital tuberculosis cure (85% cure rates) only in the intensive treatment phase (for 2-3 months) and outpatient intermittent treatment (for 2-4 months) with and without meals were 2415.34 and 2142.17 respectively. If the efficiency is equal, the introduction of new approaches to organizing the detection and treatment tuberculosis cases may save 3877.7 for each cured tuberculosis case and 2419.2 for each patient detected.
PubMed ID
9691679 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Current trends in the epidemiology of tuberculosis and ways of reducing a reservoir of infection].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210132
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1997;(1):4-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997

[Diagnosis, clinical picture and treatment policy in acute progressive forms of pulmonary tuberculosis under present-day epidemiological conditions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202451
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1999;(1):22-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
A G Khomenko
V Iu Mishin
V I Chukanov
A A Korneev
G A Voronina
I A Vasil'eva
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1999;(1):22-7
Date
1999
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Antitubercular Agents - therapeutic use
Disease Progression
Drug Therapy, Combination
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Mycobacterium tuberculosis - isolation & purification
Radiography, Thoracic
Russia - epidemiology
Salvage Therapy
Tuberculin Test
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Abstract
Among 103 examinees, the most common clinical type was caseous pneumonia (45.6%), progressive fibrocavernous tuberculosis (20.4%), infiltrative caseous pneumonia (17.5%), disseminated tuberculosis (16.5%). Progression was characterized by cavern formation in 91.1% of patients, with large and giant caverns containing nonspecific microbes forming in 79.6%. All the patients were found to isolate bacteria and 93.5% showed their excess. Drug-resistant microbes were identified in 62.1% of patients; polydrug resistance was seen in 37.5%. Chemotherapy was performed at the first stage by using 5 drugs: isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, ethambutol plus kanamycin or amikacin. A combination of reserve drugs, including prothionamide, ofloxacin (ciprofloxacin) amikacin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol, was used in patients with polyresistance. Symptomatic and pathogenetic therapies should aim at correcting complications and concomitant abnormalities. Following 6 months, 80% of patients stopped isolating bacteria, the process became stable and they could be prepared for planned surgical treatment. In 20% of cases, the process was progressive and it required salvage operations.
PubMed ID
10199178 View in PubMed
Less detail

[DOTS strategy and its application in Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202456
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1999;(1):4-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
A G Khomenko
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1999;(1):4-8
Date
1999
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antitubercular Agents - therapeutic use
Communicable Disease Control - methods - organization & administration - trends
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Mycobacterium tuberculosis - isolation & purification
Russia - epidemiology
Tuberculin Test
Tuberculosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Leading principles of DOTS strategy for Russia are outlined. It has been introduced in Russia since 1994 in Ivanovo, Tomsk Regions, Mary El Republic. New territories (Leningrad and Arkhangelsk Regions) have recently joined the project. Methods of detecting bacillary patients, scheme of chemotherapy for different tuberculosis patients and of bacteriological and x-ray follow-up control are presented. Positive aspects of the program are analyzed as well as causes of its insufficient benefit under conditions of Russian Federation.
PubMed ID
10199172 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Sociomedical aspects of detection and treatment of patients with tuberculosis under present conditions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209738
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1997;(6):15-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
V V Punga
A G Khomenko
M B Stoiunin
I D Danilova
S I Kovaleva
M P Zhukova
T A Khudushina
L N Rybka
L P Alekseeva
A N Starikov
T A Grishina
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1997;(6):15-7
Date
1997
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antitubercular Agents - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Mycobacterium tuberculosis - isolation & purification
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Sputum - microbiology
Survival Rate - trends
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Abstract
By analyzing the present-day tuberculosis epidemiological situation in the country and sociomedical characteristics of new cases, the authors present methods for detecting and treating patients, which are of paramount importance for today. Of the most significance is the need to promptly identify patients with strains on their referral to the general somatic hospitals for complaints by using 3-multiple sputum bacterioscopy for Mycobacterium tuberculosis by the Ziehl-Neelsen method. The vital problem is also to change chemotherapeutical regimens as more severe progressive types of the disease require more active treatment in the first months after detection especially in the cohort of socially disadapted persons.
PubMed ID
9503922 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Trends in the field of tuberculous diseases in the Eastern Europe and former U.S.S.R.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69598
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1994;(6):2-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
M K Ravilóne
K. Esteves
A. Koshi
G L Rider
K. Stiblo
A G Khomenko
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1994;(6):2-10
Date
1994
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Antitubercular Agents - therapeutic use
BCG Vaccine
English Abstract
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Tuberculin Test
Tuberculosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
USSR - epidemiology
World Health Organization
Abstract
According to WHO questionnaire data, reports of national ministries of health, medical associations and other medical institutions, tuberculosis morbidity in the majority of the East European countries and CIS surpasses that for the West Europe. In 1990-1992 it varied from 18 to 80 cases per 100,000 people. The lowest morbidity was recorded in the Czech Republic, the highest in Roumania and Kazakhstan. In Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Russia and Ukraine tuberculosis morbidity tends to a slow reduction, while in Armenia, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Roumania, Turkmenistan mortality rates constantly grow. Antituberculous therapeutic and prophylactic policy in the East Europe and CIS should be aimed at finding the resources for adequate supply of the population with antituberculous medications, introduction of WHO-recommended short course of chemotherapy. On demand, health care system should be restructured and new educational programs for specialists and the population introduced.
PubMed ID
7708639 View in PubMed
Less detail

Tuberculosis trends in eastern Europe and the former USSR.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7936
Source
Tuber Lung Dis. 1994 Dec;75(6):400-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
M C Raviglione
H L Rieder
K. Styblo
A G Khomenko
K. Esteves
A. Kochi
Author Affiliation
Tuberculosis Programme, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
Source
Tuber Lung Dis. 1994 Dec;75(6):400-16
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antitubercular Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Disease Notification
Europe, Eastern - epidemiology
Female
HIV Infections - complications
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Tuberculosis - complications - epidemiology - mortality
USSR - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this paper is to assess trends in tuberculosis morbidity and mortality in the countries of Eastern Europe and the former USSR. Data on morbidity and mortality were obtained from reports of the Ministries of Health, a 1992 WHO questionnaire, national tuberculosis associations, and other sources. The quality of surveillance of tuberculosis cases differs widely between countries. Ranging from 19 to 80 per 100,000 population in 1990-1992, tuberculosis notification rates of most Eastern European and former USSR countries are higher than those of Western European countries. The lowest tuberculosis notification rate is reported in the Czech Republic, while the highest are reported in Romania and Kazakhstan. While in Albania, Croatia and Slovenia notification rates have continued to decline, in the remaining countries of Eastern Europe the declining trend has recently stopped. Nevertheless, countries such as the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and the Slovak Republic have experienced a distinct rate decrease when the 3-year average rate around 1985 is compared to that around 1990, despite the very recent levelling-off or increase. In Romania, the previous decline in notification rate ended in 1985 and in the period 1986-1992 an average 5.4% annual increase was observed. In this country, two-thirds of all cases still occur among young adults. Among the Baltic countries of the former USSR, the declining trend continues in Estonia, whereas in Latvia and Lithuania notification rates decreased less markedly from 1985 to 1990 than in the first half of the 1980s. Among the other European countries of the former USSR, Russia and Ukraine had a slow decline in the first half of the 1980s and a more pronounced one from 1985 to 1990. During the latter period of time, in Belarus and Moldova the decrease has been steeper. In the Caucasian countries of the former USSR, where underreporting and low case-finding are recognized, case rates have stabilized in Armenia, while in Azerbaijan and Georgia there was a decrease from 1985 to 1990. Among the Asian countries of the former USSR, Kazakhastan and Tajikistan reported a lower decline in case rates from 1985 to 1990 than from 1980 to 1985. Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan reported increases in notification rates from 1985 to 1990: in Turkmenistan an average 5.5% annual increase in rate was observed between 1987 and 1991. Tuberculosis mortality is steadily increasing in Romania, Armenia, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, and Turkmenistan, while no decline is seen in most of the other countries of Eastern Europe and the former USSR.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)
PubMed ID
7718828 View in PubMed
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[Tuberculosis: yesterday, today, tomorrow].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209740
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1997;(6):9-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
A G Khomenko
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1997;(6):9-11
Date
1997
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antitubercular Agents - therapeutic use
BCG Vaccine - therapeutic use
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Prevalence
Russia - epidemiology
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - history - prevention & control
Abstract
The historical aspects of phisiology are briefly outlined. The main factors that promote the prevalence of tuberculosis are characterized. The present-day tuberculosis epidemiological situation makes one to correct antituberculous measures and with the use of new investigations and developments to improve the identification of patients with tuberculosis, primarily those with contagious types of the disease, to introduce the currently available short-term regimens of 2-stage drug therapy, to design novel agents and depot formulations of the well known ones. Further investigations are required to search for a new tuberculosis vaccine.
PubMed ID
9503920 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.