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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Delayed pro-opiomelanocortin activation after ethanol intake in man.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11513
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1994 Oct;18(5):1226-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1994
Author
A C Ekman
O. Vakkuri
O. Vuolteenaho
J. Leppäluoto
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of Oulu Medical School, Finland.
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1994 Oct;18(5):1226-9
Date
Oct-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - blood
Arousal - physiology
Circadian Rhythm - physiology
Corticotropin - blood
Cross-Over Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Double-Blind Method
Ethanol - pharmacokinetics
Female
Humans
Hydrocortisone - blood
Male
Pro-Opiomelanocortin - blood
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
beta-Endorphin - blood
Abstract
To elucidate the effect of ethanol on the secretion of ACTH and beta-endorphin (BE) as the representatives of the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) system, as well as cortisol as the hypophyseally regulated peripheral hormone, we measured concentrations of serum ethanol and plasma ACTH, BE, and cortisol at 1- to 4-hr intervals for 12 hr after administration of 0.5 and 1.0 g ethanol/kg of body weight and placebo drinks between 1900-1945 hr to nine healthy volunteers according to a double-blind, cross-over design. Plasma ACTH, BE, and cortisol showed an expected diurnal rhythm with the highest levels at 0700 hr. Intake of ethanol had no statistically significant effects on plasma ACTH up to 0700 hr in the morning. The higher dose caused increased levels of BE at 0100 hr and both doses at 0200 hr. Plasma cortisol at 0400 hr was higher in subjects receiving 1.0 g ethanol/kg than in those receiving placebo (p
PubMed ID
7847611 View in PubMed
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Ethanol decreases nocturnal plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP 99-126) but not the N-terminal fragment of pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP 1-98) in man.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11594
Source
Clin Sci (Lond). 1994 Mar;86(3):285-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1994
Author
A C Ekman
O. Vakkuri
O. Vuolteenaho
J. Leppäluoto
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Clin Sci (Lond). 1994 Mar;86(3):285-90
Date
Mar-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Atrial Natriuretic Factor - blood
Comparative Study
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Double-Blind Method
Ethanol - pharmacology
Female
Humans
Male
Osmolar Concentration
Peptide Fragments - blood
Protein Precursors - blood
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sodium - blood
Time Factors
Urination - drug effects
Water-Electrolyte Balance - drug effects
Abstract
1. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of atrial natriuretic peptides in the regulation of water and electrolyte balance after alcohol intake. To this end we measured the plasma concentrations of ethanol, atrial natriuretic peptide 99-126 and the N-terminal fragment of pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (atrial natriuretic peptide 1-98), serum osmolality and serum sodium concentration, and urine output, urine osmolality and urinary sodium excretion for 12 h after administration of ethanol (0, 0.5 and 1.0 g body weight/kg) and placebo drinks to nine healthy subjects according to a double-blind cross-over design. 2. Intake of ethanol (at 19.00-19.45 hours) inhibited the nocturnal increase in the plasma atrial natriuretic peptide 99-126 level dose-dependently (P
PubMed ID
8156739 View in PubMed
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Ethanol decreases nocturnal plasma levels of thyrotropin and growth hormone but not those of thyroid hormones or prolactin in man.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11217
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1996 Jul;81(7):2627-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
A C Ekman
O. Vakkuri
M. Ekman
J. Leppäluoto
A. Ruokonen
M. Knip
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1996 Jul;81(7):2627-32
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Circadian Rhythm
Cross-Over Studies
Double-Blind Method
Ethanol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Female
Growth Hormone - blood
Humans
Male
Prolactin - blood
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Thyroid Hormones - blood
Thyrotropin - blood
Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone - diagnostic use
Abstract
Previous studies on the effects of ethanol on circulating pituitary hormones have been carried out mostly during daytime when the secretion of these hormones is generally at a nadir. Therefore, we studied the effects of ethanol on the nocturnal secretion of GH, PRL, TSH, and thyroid hormones (protocol I, nine healthy subjects, five women) and on the TSH and PRL responses to synthetic TRH (protocol II, healthy subjects, four women). Ethanol was given in doses of 0, 0.5 or 1.0 g/kg of BW(protocol I) and 0 or 1.0 g/kg (protocol II) and ingested po at 1900-1945 h. In protocol I, plasma GH rose from 0.6 +/- 0.2 microgram/L (mean +/- SE) at 2200 h to 25.0 +/- 4.3 micrograms/L at 0100 h in control subjects and was almost completely inhibited at 4.5 +/- 1.7 micrograms/L at 0100 h in subjects receiving 1.0 g/kg ethanol (P
PubMed ID
8675588 View in PubMed
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Ethanol induces a paradoxical simultaneous increase in circulating concentrations of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 and insulin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11350
Source
Metabolism. 1995 Oct;44(10):1356-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
M. Knip
A C Ekman
M. Ekman
J. Leppäluoto
O. Vakkuri
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Metabolism. 1995 Oct;44(10):1356-9
Date
Oct-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - analysis
C-Peptide - blood
Cross-Over Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Double-Blind Method
Eating - physiology
Ethanol - blood - pharmacology
Female
Humans
Hyperinsulinism - blood - etiology - metabolism
Insulin - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 1 - blood - metabolism
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the effect of acute alcohol intake on circulating concentrations of insulin, C-peptide, insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), and plasma glucose levels. We measured these parameters for 12 hours after administration of 0, 0.5, or 1.0 g ethanol/kg body weight to nine healthy volunteers between 7:00 and 7:45 PM according to a randomized, double-blind, crossover design. Following a snack at 9:00 PM, plasma insulin (P
PubMed ID
7476297 View in PubMed
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Ethanol inhibits melatonin secretion in healthy volunteers in a dose-dependent randomized double blind cross-over study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11666
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1993 Sep;77(3):780-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
A C Ekman
J. Leppäluoto
P. Huttunen
K. Aranko
O. Vakkuri
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1993 Sep;77(3):780-3
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Circadian Rhythm
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Double-Blind Method
Epinephrine - blood
Ethanol - administration & dosage - blood - pharmacology
Female
Humans
Kinetics
Male
Melatonin - blood - secretion
Norepinephrine - blood
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
To elucidate the effects of alcohol on pineal rhythmicity, ethanol was administered in the evening in amounts usually consumed during social ingestion to nine healthy volunteers in a double blind, cross-over study. Plasma concentrations of melatonin, catecholamines (norepinephrine and epinephrine), and ethanol were measured by RIA, high pressure liquid chromatography, and gas chromatography before and for 12 h after the administration of 0, 0.5, and 1 g ethanol/kg wt. Plasma melatonin and catecholamines displayed expected diurnal rhythms, with peak values at 0300-0400 h for melatonin and trough values at 0100-0400 h for catecholamines. Intake of ethanol between 1900-1945 h inhibited the nocturnal melatonin secretion dose-dependently during the first half of the night, with no changes in urinary excretion of melatonin. The inhibition was 41% (P
PubMed ID
8370699 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.