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122 records – page 1 of 13.

Alcohol and breast cancer in women: a pooled analysis of cohort studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10930
Source
JAMA. 1998 Feb 18;279(7):535-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-18-1998
Author
S A Smith-Warner
D. Spiegelman
S S Yaun
P A van den Brandt
A R Folsom
R A Goldbohm
S. Graham
L. Holmberg
G R Howe
J R Marshall
A B Miller
J D Potter
F E Speizer
W C Willett
A. Wolk
D J Hunter
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Mass 02115, USA.
Source
JAMA. 1998 Feb 18;279(7):535-40
Date
Feb-18-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Diet
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Humans
Likelihood Functions
Linear Models
Menarche
Menopause
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the risk of invasive breast cancer associated with total and beverage-specific alcohol consumption and to evaluate whether dietary and nondietary factors modify the association. DATA SOURCES: We included in these analyses 6 prospective studies that had at least 200 incident breast cancer cases, assessed long-term intake of food and nutrients, and used a validated diet assessment instrument. The studies were conducted in Canada, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United States. Alcohol intake was estimated by food frequency questionnaires in each study. The studies included a total of 322647 women evaluated for up to 11 years, including 4335 participants with a diagnosis of incident invasive breast cancer. DATA EXTRACTION: Pooled analysis of primary data using analyses consistent with each study's original design and the random-effects model for the overall pooled analyses. DATA SYNTHESIS: For alcohol intakes less than 60 g/d (reported by >99% of participants), risk increased linearly with increasing intake; the pooled multivariate relative risk for an increment of 10 g/d of alcohol (about 0.75-1 drink) was 1.09 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-1.13; P for heterogeneity among studies, .71). The multivariate-adjusted relative risk for total alcohol intakes of 30 to less than 60 g/d (about 2-5 drinks) vs nondrinkers was 1.41 (95% CI, 1.18-1.69). Limited data suggested that alcohol intakes of at least 60 g/d were not associated with further increased risk. The specific type of alcoholic beverage did not strongly influence risk estimates. The association between alcohol intake and breast cancer was not modified by other factors. CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol consumption is associated with a linear increase in breast cancer incidence in women over the range of consumption reported by most women. Among women who consume alcohol regularly, reducing alcohol consumption is a potential means to reduce breast cancer risk.
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 1998 Oct 7;280(13):1138-99777807
PubMed ID
9480365 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and risk of benign proliferative epithelial disorders of the breast: a case-cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197612
Source
Public Health Nutr. 1998 Sep;1(3):139-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
T E Rohan
M. Jain
A B Miller
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Canada. tom.rohan@utoronto.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 1998 Sep;1(3):139-45
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Diet Surveys
Female
Fibrocystic Breast Disease - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Precancerous Conditions - epidemiology - pathology
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
To study the association between alcohol consumption and risk of benign proliferative epithelial disorders (BPED) of the breast (conditions which are thought to have premalignant potential).
Case-cohort study.
The study was undertaken within the 56,537 women in the Canadian National Breast Screening Study (NBSS) who completed self-administered dietary questionnaires. (The NBSS is a randomized controlled trial of screening for breast cancer in women aged 40-59 years at recruitment.)
The study subjects were the 657 women in the dietary cohort who were diagnosed with biopsy-confirmed incident BPED. For comparative purposes, a subcohort consisting of a random sample of 5681 women was selected from the full dietary cohort. After exclusions for various reasons, the analyses were based on 557 cases and 5028 non-cases.
When compared to non-drinkers, rate ratios (95% CI) for those consuming > 0 and 10 and 20 and 30 g day(-1) were 0.35 (0.27-0.45), 0.26 (0.18-0.39), 0.29 (0.18-0.48), and 0.23 (0.13-0.40), respectively (the associated P value for the trend was 0.089). Similar findings were obtained from analyses conducted separately in the screened and control arms of the NBSS, in premenopausal and postmenopausal women, and for non-atypical and atypical forms of BPED, and there was little difference between the results for screen-detected and interval-detected BPED.
Alcohol consumption was associated with a non-dose-dependent reduction in risk of BPED.
PubMed ID
10933411 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and risk of breast cancer: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198787
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2000 Mar;11(3):239-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
T E Rohan
M. Jain
G R Howe
A B Miller
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2000 Mar;11(3):239-47
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
To study the association between alcohol consumption and breast cancer risk.
A case-cohort analysis was undertaken within the cohort of 56,837 women who were enrolled in the Canadian National Breast Screening Study (NBSS) and who completed a self-administered dietary questionnaire. (The NBSS is a randomized controlled trial of screening for breast cancer in women aged 40-59 at recruitment.) The cohort was recruited between 1980 and 1985, and during follow-up to the end of 1993 a total of 1469 women in the dietary cohort were diagnosed with biopsy-confirmed incident breast cancer. For comparative purposes a subcohort consisting of a random sample of 5681 women was selected from the full dietary cohort. After exclusions for various reasons the analyses were based on 1336 cases and 5238 noncases.
When compared to nondrinkers the adjusted incidence rate ratios (95% confidence intervals) for those consuming > 0 and 10 and 20 and 30 and 40 and 50 g/day were 1.01 (0.84-1.22), 1.16 (0.91-1.47), 1.27 (0.91-1.78), 0.77 (0.51-1.16), 1.00 (0.57-1.75), and 1.70 (0.97-2.98), respectively; the associated p value for the test for trend was 0.351. Similar findings were obtained when analyses were conducted separately in the screened and control arms of the NBSS, in premenopausal and postmenopausal women, for screen-detected and interval-detected breast cancer, and by levels of other breast cancer risk factors.
The results of this study suggest that alcohol consumption might be associated with increased risk of breast cancer at relatively high levels of intake.
PubMed ID
10782658 View in PubMed
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Alternate indices of electric and magnetic field exposures among Ontario electrical utility workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205865
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 1998;19(3):140-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
P J Villeneuve
D A Agnew
P N Corey
A B Miller
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 1998;19(3):140-51
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biometry
Cohort Studies
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Electronics, Medical - instrumentation
Humans
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure
Occupations
Ontario - epidemiology
Power Plants
Abstract
Epidemiologic studies examining the risk of cancer among occupational groups exposed to electric fields (EF) and or magnetic fields (MF) have relied on traditional summaries of exposure such as the time weighted arithmetic or geometric mean exposure. Findings from animal and cellular studies support the consideration of alternative measures of exposure capable of capturing threshold and intermittent measures of field strength. The main objective of this study was to identify a series of suitable exposure metrics for an ongoing cancer incidence study in a cohort of Ontario electric utility workers. Principal components analysis (PCA) and correlational analysis were used to explore the relationships within and between series of EF and MF exposure indices. Exposure data were collected using personal monitors worn by a sample of 820 workers which yielded 4247 worker days of measurement data. For both EF and MF, the first axis of the PCA identified a series of intercorrelated indices that included the geometric mean, median and arithmetic mean. A considerable portion of the variability in EF and MF exposures were accounted for by two other principal component axes. The second axes for EF and MF exposures were representative of the standard deviation (standard deviation) and thresholds of field measures. To a lesser extent, the variability in the exposure variable was explained by time dependent indices which consisted of autocorrelations at 5 min lags and average transitions in field strength. Our results suggest that the variability in exposure data can only be accounted for by using several exposure indices, and consequently, a series of metrics should be used when exploring the risk of cancer owing to MF and EF exposure in this cohort. Furthermore, the poor correlations observed between indices of MF and EF reinforce the need to be take both fields into account when assessing the risk of cancer in this occupational group.
PubMed ID
9554692 View in PubMed
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An epidemiologic study of breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248535
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1978 Jun;107(6):510-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1978
Author
N W Choi
G R Howe
A B Miller
V. Matthews
R W Morgan
L. Munan
J D Burch
J. Feather
M. Jain
A. Kelly
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1978 Jun;107(6):510-21
Date
Jun-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Body Height
Body Weight
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Canada
Diet Surveys
Female
Humans
Marriage
Menopause
Middle Aged
Parity
Pregnancy
Risk
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
A case-control study has been conducted in four areas of Canada in which 400 cases of breast cancer matched by age and marital status with neighborhood controls were administered medical and dietary questionnaires. The study is suggestive of an increased risk of breast cancer in post-menopausal women with younger age at menarche and an increased risk with delay of age at natural menopause. No protective effect of early age at first pregnancy was demonstrated in either pre- or post-menopausal women. An increased frequency of pregnancies of four months duration or less was found in cases compared to controls and a greater frequency in pre-menopausal cases compared to controls of a history of irregular menstrual periods. In pre-menopausal women no association has been found between increased height and weight as risk factors for breast cancer. For post-menopausal women, however, a weak association with increased height has been found, while a strong association with increased weight both at the time of menopause and the 12 months preceding diagnosis has ben confirmed.
PubMed ID
665665 View in PubMed
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An investigation of recall bias in the reporting of past food intake among breast cancer cases and controls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225989
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 1991 Aug;1(5):439-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1991
Author
C M Friedenreich
G R Howe
A B Miller
Author Affiliation
National Cancer Institute of Canada (NCIC) Epidemiology Unit, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 1991 Aug;1(5):439-53
Date
Aug-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Diet Records
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Marriage
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Occupations
Questionnaires
Abstract
A nested case-control study was conducted within the Canadian National Breast Screening Study to examine whether there was evidence for biased reporting of past food intake. A total of 325 case patients with breast cancer and 628 matched control subjects completed a self-administered food frequency questionnaire in 1988, recalling their diets originally reported on enrollment into the National Breast Screening Study between 1982 and 1985. Recall of food items was very similar for case patients and control subjects. The magnitude of the odds ratios for the association between these food groups and breast cancer from the prospectively and retrospectively collected data was not systematically different. There was little evidence for recall bias in the reporting of past food intake from these data.
PubMed ID
1669524 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Approaches to cancer control in Canada].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233774
Source
Vopr Onkol. 1988;34(2):131-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988

Approaches to cancer control in Canada, and internationally.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236042
Source
Prog Clin Biol Res. 1987;248:9-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
A B Miller
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics, University of Toronto.
Source
Prog Clin Biol Res. 1987;248:9-23
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Food Habits
Humans
International Cooperation
Mass Screening - trends
Neoplasms - prevention & control
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
PubMed ID
3313426 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are female smokers at higher risk for lung cancer than male smokers? A case-control analysis by histologic type.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220337
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1993 Sep 1;138(5):281-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1993
Author
H A Risch
G R Howe
M. Jain
J D Burch
E J Holowaty
A B Miller
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1993 Sep 1;138(5):281-93
Date
Sep-1-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Carcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Carcinoma, Small Cell - epidemiology - etiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Time Factors
Abstract
A case-control study of male-female differences in cigarette smoking and lung cancer was conducted during 1981-1985 in Toronto, St. Catharine's, and Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada. In total, 442 female and 403 male histologically verified cancer cases were individually matched by age and area of residence to each other and to 410 female and 362 male randomly selected population controls. Subjects were interviewed concerning their exposures to various life-style factors, and in particular, they received detailed questioning regarding their lifelong histories of usage of tobacco products. It was found that, for both sexes, a greatly elevated risk of developing lung cancer was associated with cigarette consumption, increasing with pack-years of cigarettes smoked and declining with duration of time since quitting smoking. Furthermore, the association was significantly (p = 0.010) and appreciably stronger for females than for males. At a history of 40 pack-years relative to lifelong nonsmoking, the odds ratio for women was 27.9 (95% confidence interval (CI) 14.9-52.0) and that for men was 9.60 (95% CI 5.64-16.3). Higher odds ratios for females were also seen within each of the major histologic groupings. Thus, the higher elevated risk of lung cancer currently observed in other studies for female ever smokers compared with male ever smokers, while possibly attributable in part to greater smoking cessation among males, may be due to higher susceptibility among females.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Epidemiol. 1994 Jul 15;140(2):185-6; author reply 187-88023806
Comment In: Am J Epidemiol. 1994 Jul 15;140(2):186-7; author reply 187-88023808
PubMed ID
8395141 View in PubMed
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122 records – page 1 of 13.