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The effects of phototherapy (PT) on diurnal rhythms of physiological parameters and melatonin excretion in subjects with seasonal affective disorder (SAD).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46661
Source
Pages 327-329 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
  1 document  
Author
V A Cherepanova
K V Danilenko
A A Putilov
Author Affiliation
Institute of Physiology, Siberian Branch, Academy of Medical Sciences of the USSR, Novosibirsk.
Source
Pages 327-329 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Body temperature
Circadian Rhythm
Heart rate
Humans
Melatonin - urine
Phototherapy
Respiration
Seasonal Affective Disorder - physiopathology - therapy - urine
PubMed ID
1365143 View in PubMed
Documents
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The importance of full summer remission as a criterion for the diagnosis of seasonal affective disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46474
Source
Psychopathology. 1996;29(4):230-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
K V Danilenko
A A Putilov
Author Affiliation
Institute of Physiology, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia.
Source
Psychopathology. 1996;29(4):230-5
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Random Allocation
Seasonal Affective Disorder - diagnosis - psychology
Abstract
From 1987 to 1994, seasonal affective disorder (SAD) has been diagnosed using the Rosenthal or DSM-III-R criteria. No major differences between them have been found, except that the DSM-III-R criteria were more stringent and difficult to implement. Little attention has been paid to differences in the criterion of the quality of improvement in summer. This study compared two groups of winter depressives characterized by complete or incomplete summer remission. Incomplete summer remission is associated with increased heterogeneity of the demographic and clinical profile of the disorder and a shift of this profile to that of classical depression. The data support clinical use of the DSM-IV criterion 'full remission' in the diagnosis of SAD.
PubMed ID
8865354 View in PubMed
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Mood and energy regulation in seasonal and non-seasonal depression before and after midday treatment with physical exercise or bright light.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46197
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2000 Apr 24;94(1):29-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-24-2000
Author
B B Pinchasov
A M Shurgaja
O V Grischin
A A Putilov
Author Affiliation
Institute for General Pathology and Human Ecology, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 2, Timakova Street, Novosibirsk, Russia.
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2000 Apr 24;94(1):29-42
Date
Apr-24-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Weight
Energy intake
Exercise
Female
Humans
Light
Oxygen consumption
Phototherapy - methods
Seasonal Affective Disorder - metabolism - therapy
Weight Loss
Abstract
The effects of two non-drug treatments (physical exercise and bright light) on mood, body weight and oxygen consumption were compared in age-matched groups of female subjects with winter depression, non-seasonal depression or without depression. It was found that oxygen consumption in the pre-treatment condition was similar in non-depressed subjects (n=18) and depressed non-seasonals (n=18), while comparatively lower values were obtained in winter depression (n=27). Neither mood nor metabolic parameters changed significantly in the group of nine untreated winter depressives. One week of physical exercise (1-h pedaling on a bicycle ergometer between 13.00 and 14.00 h) increased oxygen consumption in the group of nine winter depressives and lowered oxygen consumption in nine-subject groups of depressed and non-depressed non-seasonals. One week of bright light treatment (2-h exposure to 2500 lux between 14.00 and 16.00 h) increased oxygen consumption in nine winter depressives and nine non-depressed subjects, while no significant change in oxygen consumption was found in nine subjects with non-seasonal depression. Weight loss was observed in the groups treated with physical exercise and in the group of light-treated winter depressives. Winter depression responded equally well to exercising and light, while a significant therapeutic difference in favor of exercising was found in non-seasonal depression. Overall, the results of the study suggest that energy-regulating systems are implicated in the antidepressant action of the non-drug treatments.
PubMed ID
10788675 View in PubMed
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Phase of melatonin rhythm in winter depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46194
Source
Adv Exp Med Biol. 1999;460:441-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
A A Putilov
G S Russkikh
K V Danilenko
Author Affiliation
Institute for Medical and Biological Cybernetics, Siberian Branch, RAMS, Novosibirsk, Russia. putilov@cyber.ma.nsc.ru
Source
Adv Exp Med Biol. 1999;460:441-58
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Circadian Rhythm
Female
Humans
Male
Melatonin - physiology
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Russia
Seasonal Affective Disorder - physiopathology
Seasons
Sleep - physiology
Wakefulness - physiology
PubMed ID
10810546 View in PubMed
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Phototherapy for seasonal affective disorder (SAD) in Siberia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46660
Source
Pages 330-333 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
  1 document  
Author
K V Danilenko
V A Cherepanova
N V Volf
N I Senkova
A A Putilov
Author Affiliation
Biological Rhythms Research Laboratory, Siberian Branch, Academy of Medical Sciences of the USSR, Novosibirsk.
Source
Pages 330-333 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adult
Circadian Rhythm
Female
Humans
Male
Phototherapy
Seasonal Affective Disorder - diagnosis - physiopathology - therapy
Siberia
PubMed ID
1365144 View in PubMed
Documents
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The relation of sleep-wake patterns to seasonal depressive behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3352
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1994 Jul;53(3):130-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
A A Putilov
J M Booker
K V Danilenko
Zolotarev DYu
Author Affiliation
Institute of Physiology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Novosibirsk.
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1994 Jul;53(3):130-6
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect - physiology
Alaska
Appetite - physiology
Arctic Regions
Body Weight - physiology
Circadian Rhythm
Darkness
Depression - physiopathology - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Russia
Seasonal Affective Disorder - physiopathology - psychology
Seasons
Siberia
Sleep - physiology
Social Behavior
Turkmenistan
Wakefulness - physiology
Abstract
A sample of 1644 adults in Alaska, Chukotka, Yakutiya, Western Siberia and Turkmenistan were surveyed to examine the relationship between seasonal depressive behavior and sleep-wake patterns. Interviews included items derived from the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire, a 20 item general depression scale, and a 40 item sleep-wake questionnaire designed to assess the underlying mechanisms which regulate the cycles of sleep and wakefulness. Results show that subjects who suffer from seasonal depressive behavior, at latitudes ranging from 38-66 degrees North, are characterized by a sleep-wake pattern including 1) difficulty waking in the morning, 2) a low capacity to be awake at unusual times (out of sync with normal circadian patterns) and 3) a lower quality of nighttime sleep. Subjects with high levels of general depression suffer many of the same sleep problems, but this is not due to the measured association between seasonality and other depression. Disturbances in sleep-wake patterns may help to expand our understanding of the pathogenesis of seasonal depressive behavior, but further research to differentiate it from general depression is required.
PubMed ID
7986317 View in PubMed
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Seasonal depression and sleep disturbances in Alaska and Siberia: a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3374
Source
Pages 281-284 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
  1 document  
Author
J M Booker
C J Hellekson
A A Putilov
K V Danilenko
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Alaska Anchorage.
Source
Pages 281-284 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Continental Population Groups
Female
Humans
Male
Oceanic Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Pilot Projects
Prevalence
Seasonal Affective Disorder - epidemiology - ethnology
Siberia - epidemiology
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology - ethnology
PubMed ID
1365129 View in PubMed
Documents
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7 records – page 1 of 1.