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Developing and piloting a form for student assessment of faculty professionalism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139530
Source
Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2011 May;16(2):223-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Sarah Todhunter
Sylvia R Cruess
Richard L Cruess
Meredith Young
Yvonne Steinert
Author Affiliation
Centre for Medical Education, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
Source
Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2011 May;16(2):223-38
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Curriculum
Faculty, Medical - standards
Humans
Learning
Personal Satisfaction
Pilot Projects
Professional Competence
Quebec
Schools, Medical
Staff Development
Students, Medical
Abstract
One of the impediments to teaching professionalism is unprofessional behavior amongst clinical teachers. No method of reliably assessing the professional behavior of clinical teachers has yet been reported. The aim of this project was to develop and pilot such a tool. Thirty-four desirable professional behaviors in clinical teachers were identified. Medical students (n = 13) and medical educators (n = 30) rated their importance and validity. Based on the ratings, 16 behaviors in 4 dimensions were included in an assessment form that was piloted in the Department of Pediatrics at McGill University, with medical students (n = 94) rating the professionalism of their clinical faculty (n = 20). One hundred and ninety forms were returned with between 1 and 22 evaluations per faculty member. Scores ranged from 25 to 48 (maximum rating = 48, mean score = 42.7, SD = 6.29). A generalizability analysis was conducted; internal consistency was 0.89, and reliability for a mean of 8.23 ratings per faculty member was 0.53. Inter-rater reliability for one item was 0.11, potentially due to the context specificity of behavior or low frequency of unprofessional behaviors. Exploratory factor analysis revealed 3 factors with eigen values over 1. Assessment of the professionalism of clinical teaching faculty appears to be feasible, acceptable and reasonably reliable. The explicit evaluation of professional conduct in clinical faculty could encourage the maintenance of professional behaviors and potentially decrease the effects of negative role modeling and positively affect the hidden and informal curricula.
PubMed ID
21052829 View in PubMed
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Faculty development as an instrument of change: a case study on teaching professionalism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160535
Source
Acad Med. 2007 Nov;82(11):1057-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Yvonne Steinert
Richard L Cruess
Sylvia R Cruess
J Donald Boudreau
Abraham Fuks
Author Affiliation
Centre for Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. yvonne.steinert@mcgill.ca
Source
Acad Med. 2007 Nov;82(11):1057-64
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Faculty, Medical
Humans
Inservice Training - methods
Organizational Case Studies
Organizational Culture
Organizational Innovation
Professional Competence
Quebec
Abstract
Faculty development includes those activities that are designed to renew or assist faculty in their different roles. As such, it encompasses a wide variety of interventions to help individual faculty members improve their skills. However, it can also be used as a tool to engage faculty in the process of institutional change. The Faculty of Medicine at McGill University determined that such a change was necessary to effectively teach and evaluate professionalism at the undergraduate level, and a faculty development program on professionalism helped to bring about the desired curricular change. The authors describe that program to illustrate how faculty development can serve as a useful instrument in the process of change. The ongoing program, established in 1997, consists of medical education rounds and "think tanks" to promote faculty consensus and buy-in, and diverse faculty-wide and departmental workshops to convey core content, examine teaching and evaluation strategies, and promote reflection and self-awareness. To analyze the approach used and the results achieved, the authors applied a well-known model by J.P. Kotter for implementing change that consists of the following phases: establishing a sense of urgency, forming a powerful guiding coalition, creating a vision, communicating the vision, empowering others to act on the vision, generating short-term wins, consolidating gains and producing more change, and anchoring new approaches in the culture. The authors hope that their school's experience will be useful to others who seek institutional change via faculty development.
PubMed ID
17971692 View in PubMed
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Faculty development: if you build it, they will come.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141505
Source
Med Educ. 2010 Sep;44(9):900-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Yvonne Steinert
Mary Ellen Macdonald
Miriam Boillat
Michelle Elizov
Sarkis Meterissian
Saleem Razack
Marie-Noel Ouellet
Peter J McLeod
Author Affiliation
Faculty Development Office, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. yvonne.steinert@mcgill.ca
Source
Med Educ. 2010 Sep;44(9):900-7
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Education, Medical - organization & administration - standards
Faculty, Medical - organization & administration - standards
Focus Groups - methods
Humans
Program Development - methods - standards
Quebec
Staff Development - organization & administration - standards
Abstract
The goals of this study were three-fold: to explore the reasons why some clinical teachers regularly attend centralised faculty development activities; to compare their responses with those of colleagues who do not attend, and to learn how we can make faculty development programmes more pertinent to teachers' needs.
In 2008-2009, we conducted focus groups with 23 clinical teachers who had participated in faculty development activities on a regular basis in order to ascertain their perceptions of faculty development, reasons for participation, and perceived barriers against involvement. Thematic analysis and research team consensus guided the data interpretation.
Reasons for regular participation included the perceptions that: faculty development enables personal and professional growth; learning and self-improvement are valued; workshop topics are viewed as relevant to teachers' needs; the opportunity to network with colleagues is appreciated, and initial positive experiences promote ongoing involvement. Barriers against participation mirrored those cited by non-attendees in an earlier study (e.g. volume of work, lack of time, logistical factors), but did not prevent participation. Suggestions for increasing participation included introducing a 'buddy system' for junior faculty members, an orientation workshop for new staff, and increased role-modelling and mentorship.
The conceptualisation of faculty development as a means to achieve specific objectives and the desire for relevant programming that addresses current needs (i.e., expectancies), together with an appreciation of learning, self-improvement and networking with colleagues (i.e., values), were highlighted as reasons for participation by regular attendees. Medical educators should consider these 'lessons learned' in the design and delivery of faculty development offerings. They should also continue to explore the notion of faculty development as a social practice and the application of motivational theories that include expectancy-value constructs to personal and professional development.
PubMed ID
20716100 View in PubMed
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Faculty development through international exchange: the IMEX initiative.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261392
Source
Med Teach. 2014 Jul;36(7):591-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Olle Ten Cate
Karen Mann
Peter McCrorie
Sari Ponzer
Linda Snell
Yvonne Steinert
Source
Med Teach. 2014 Jul;36(7):591-5
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Faculty, Medical
Great Britain
Humans
International Educational Exchange
Netherlands
Professional Competence - standards
Program Evaluation
Staff Development - methods
Sweden
Abstract
Faculty development is often local and international experiences are usually limited to conferences and courses. In 2006, five schools across the globe decided to enhance international faculty experiences through an exciting new collaboration: the International Medical Educators Exchange (IMEX) initiative.
Twice a year, one of the five schools in the Netherlands, Canada, Sweden and the UK organizes a week of faculty development activities for experienced medical educators from each school, including group discussions, short presentations, observations and active engagement in local education, one-on-one meetings with local faculty members, and many opportunities for in-depth discussion. We administered a survey to evaluate the impact of this international exchange.
By August 2013, 31 IMEX scholars had attended at least one of the 14 site visits held; most of them (29) had attended 3-5 site visits. Responding IMEX alumni (55%, N?=?16) felt that their experiences impacted their personal competence and international orientation, and to some extent their career, their daily work and their institution. Most features of the IMEX program were valued as highly important and highly successful.
IMEX has established itself as an important additional faculty development opportunity for those medical educators who wish to develop and pursue a career in education.
PubMed ID
24787528 View in PubMed
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From novice to informed educator: the teaching scholars program for educators in the health sciences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166882
Source
Acad Med. 2006 Nov;81(11):969-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Yvonne Steinert
Peter J McLeod
Author Affiliation
Centre for Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. yvonne.steinert@mcgill.edu
Source
Acad Med. 2006 Nov;81(11):969-74
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Graduate - methods
Faculty, Medical - standards
Fellowships and Scholarships
Humans
Leadership
Middle Aged
Organizational Case Studies
Professional Competence
Program Development
Quebec
Schools, Medical - organization & administration
Staff Development - methods
Total Quality Management
Abstract
The Teaching Scholars Program for Educators in the Health Sciences at McGill University, in Montreal, Quebec, was designed to promote the professional development of health science educators by increasing their expertise in developing and implementing educational programs and taking on leadership roles in education. This program, which was initiated in 1997 and is tailored to the individual needs of the participants, consists of participation in: two university courses; a monthly seminar; a research study or an educational project, consisting of curriculum design and evaluation; and faculty-wide faculty development activities. As of 2006, 34 scholars have completed this program. Outcome data indicate that the majority of teaching scholars have taken on new roles and responsibilities in medical education; maintained the changes implemented in their teaching practices; continued to participate in faculty development activities; and presented their work at educational meetings. A number of scholars have also applied successfully for educationally related grants and have published their educational projects. Five of the scholars have pursued advanced studies. This program, which aims to move beyond the improvement of teaching skills by providing a foundation for educational leadership and scholarship, resembles many others in its emphasis on independent study, peer support, and the maintenance of ongoing responsibilities. It is innovative in that scholars participate in university courses and are encouraged to attend an "outside" conference or course. The overall benefits of this program, as noted by the scholars, include increased knowledge and skills, introduction to a "community of practice," and new career paths and opportunities.
PubMed ID
17065858 View in PubMed
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The importance of physician listening from the patients' perspective: enhancing diagnosis, healing, and the doctor-patient relationship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136886
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2011 Dec;85(3):369-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Justin Jagosh
Joseph Donald Boudreau
Yvonne Steinert
Mary Ellen Macdonald
Lois Ingram
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. justin.jagosh@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2011 Dec;85(3):369-74
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attention
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Communication
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Perception
Physician-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Young Adult
Abstract
The research findings reported here describe the importance and various functions of physician listening according to patients.
Fifty-eight patients of the McGill University Health Centre were interviewed using a qualitative, interpretive design approach.
Patients explained why listening was important to them and these findings were organized into three themes: (a) listening as an essential component of clinical data gathering and diagnosis; (b) listening as a healing and therapeutic agent; and (c) listening as a means of fostering and strengthening the doctor-patient relationship. The findings are presented along with a conceptual model on the functions of physician listening.
Elucidating the multiple functions of listening in the clinical encounter from patient perspectives can assist physicians in improving their listening approach.
For training purposes, we recommend that a module on listening should lead to a discussion not only about the skill required in listening attentively, but also to the values, beliefs, attitudes, and intentions of physicians who choose to listen to their patients. This teaching objective may be facilitated by future research that explores the concept of 'authenticity' in a physician's listening approach, which we argue is central to successful clinical outcomes.
PubMed ID
21334160 View in PubMed
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Residents as role models: impact on undergraduate trainees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122208
Source
Acad Med. 2012 Sep;87(9):1282-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Robert Sternszus
Sylvia Cruess
Richard Cruess
Meredith Young
Yvonne Steinert
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. robert.sternszus@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
Acad Med. 2012 Sep;87(9):1282-7
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Career Choice
Clinical Clerkship
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Mentors
Physician's Role
Questionnaires
Students, Medical - psychology
Abstract
Although researchers have investigated the value of physician role models, residents as role models have received less attention. The objectives of this study were to (1) investigate the importance of resident role models in the education and career choices of medical students, (2) examine the types of factors students judge to be most important in selecting resident role models, and (3) evaluate the specific attributes (within each factor type) that students perceive to be most important, comparing these attributes with those previously published on physician role models.
This was a cross-sectional, survey-based study, conducted in 2011, in which graduating medical students at McGill University completed a questionnaire on their perceptions of resident role models. The authors analyzed data using descriptive statistics and, for items with scalar responses, repeated measures analysis of variance.
Of 165 possible student respondents, 151 (92%) completed the questionnaire. The findings suggest that (1) resident role models play an important role in both the education and career choice of medical students, (2) resident and attending staff role models are equally important to the education of medical students, although attending staff role models appear to be more important for students' career choices, and (3) the factors and specific attributes important in selecting resident role models align with those in previously published literature on physician role models.
This study, suggesting that resident and attending physician role models are equally important to undergraduate education, highlights the importance of supporting residents in their status as role models.
PubMed ID
22836846 View in PubMed
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The significance and impact of a faculty teaching award: disparate perceptions of department chairs and award recipients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162813
Source
Med Teach. 2006 Nov;28(7):614-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
James Brawer
Yvonne Steinert
Julie St-Cyr
Kevin Watters
Sharon Wood-Dauphinee
Author Affiliation
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, McGill University, 3640 University Street, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2B2, Canada. james.brawer@mcgill.ca
Source
Med Teach. 2006 Nov;28(7):614-7
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Awards and Prizes
Education, Medical - standards
Faculty, Medical - standards
Humans
Quebec
Questionnaires
Teaching - standards
Abstract
Teaching awards are commonly regarded as an incentive to encourage pedagogic excellence. Inasmuch as their effectiveness depends on how they are perceived by faculty, the authors investigated the impact of a teaching award in the Faculty of Medicine (Faculty Honor List for Educational Excellence) on the attitudes of award recipients and departmental chairs. A questionnaire was designed to sample opinion on the extent to which the Honor List program was publicized, whether the award contributed to recognition and/or stature in the academic unit, and whether it was personally valued by recipients. The questionnaire was sent to all 23 departmental chairs and to all 43 faculty members who had received the award between 1998 and 2002; 78% of the chairs and 77% of the recipients responded. The results revealed marked discrepancies between the perceptions of chairs and recipients. Chairs, although uncertain of the effect on quality of teaching, largely regarded the award as prestigious and well publicized within their departments. A notably smaller percentage of award recipients shared these views. Nonetheless, 93% of recipients valued the award highly, and 45% of recipients indicated that the award inspired them to enhance the quality of their teaching.
PubMed ID
17594552 View in PubMed
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Surgery residents and attending surgeons have different perceptions of feedback.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172997
Source
Med Teach. 2005 Aug;27(5):470-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
A. Sender Liberman
Moishe Liberman
Yvonne Steinert
Peter McLeod
Sarkis Meterissian
Author Affiliation
Division of General Surgery, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Med Teach. 2005 Aug;27(5):470-2
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Clerkship
Clinical Competence
Data Collection
Educational Measurement
Feedback
Hospitals, University
Humans
Internship and Residency - standards
Medical Staff, Hospital - psychology
Quebec
Questionnaires
Social Perception
Specialties, Surgical - education
Teaching - methods
Abstract
Feedback plays an important role in Postgraduate Medical Education and is indispensable in surgical training. Improvement in operating skills, for example, requires constant feedback between teacher and learner to promote reflection on performance. Prior to providing workshops on giving effective feedback, the goal of this study was to assess the perceptions of attending surgeons and residents on feedback practices in our program. We show a startling disparity in perceptions of feedback frequency and skills. The results were used in planning a Workshop on Giving Feedback for our faculty. The effectiveness of this Workshop will be assessed at a later date by administering the same questionnaire.
PubMed ID
16147804 View in PubMed
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Twelve tips for conducting a medical education journal club.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143969
Source
Med Teach. 2010;32(5):368-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Peter McLeod
Yvonne Steinert
Donald Boudreau
Linda Snell
Jeffrey Wiseman
Author Affiliation
Medicine and Pharmacology, McGill University Centre for Medical Education, Montreal, Canada. peter.mcleod@mcgill.ca
Source
Med Teach. 2010;32(5):368-70
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel
Canada
Data Collection
Education, Medical
Group Processes
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Periodicals as Topic
Abstract
Journal clubs are active at many universities and they involve many specialties and subspecialties. There is a surprising dearth of journal clubs which deal with articles related to the science of medical education.
In an effort to expose medical educators to the outstanding benefits of medical education journal clubs we have devised a set of twelve tips to success for such clubs.
We conducted a survey of journal club directors at the nine Canadian medical schools known to conduct education journal clubs. We also conducted interviews with all members of the McGill University Centre for Medical Education.
Combining the results from these two information sources allowed us to develop an approach to assuring success in medical education journal clubs.
PubMed ID
20423253 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.