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Alcohol consumption and ischemic heart disease mortality in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125189
Source
Adicciones. 2012;24(1):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Yury E Razvodovsky
Author Affiliation
Grodno State Medical University, Belarus. razvodovsky@tut.by
Source
Adicciones. 2012;24(1):23-9
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Myocardial Ischemia - mortality
Russia - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
It has been repeatedly emphasized that alcohol provides the most plausible explanation for both the high rate of cardiovascular mortality rate and its dramatic fluctuations in Russia over recent decades, while other traditional risk factors identified in epidemiological studies have little predictive value. The aim of this study was to examine the relation between alcohol consumption and ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality rates in Russia. A ge-standardized sex-specific male and female IHD mortality data for the period 1980-2005 and data on overall alcohol consumption were analyzed by means of ARIMA time series analysis. The results of the analysis showed that alcohol consumption was significantly associated with both male and female IHD mortality rates: a 1-liter increase in overall alcohol consumption would result in a 3.9% increase in the male IHD mortality rate and a 2.7% increase in the female IHD mortality rate. As a conclusion, the results of this study provide indirect support for the hypothesis that the drastic fluctuations in IHD mortality in Russia over recent decades are related to alcohol, as indicated by the close temporal association between number of deaths from IHD and overall alcohol consumption per capita.
PubMed ID
22508014 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and pancreatitis mortality in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262739
Source
JOP. 2014 Jul;15(4):365-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Yury E Razvodovsky
Source
JOP. 2014 Jul;15(4):365-70
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Pancreatitis - etiology - mortality
Risk Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Survival Rate - trends
Time Factors
Abstract
Pancreatitis is a major public health problem with high associated economic costs. The incidence of pancreatitis has increased in many European countries in recent decade. Accumulated research and empirical evidence suggests that excessive alcohol consumption is a major risk factor for both acute and chronic pancreatitis.
The aim of this study was to examine the aggregate-level relation between the alcohol consumption and pancreatitis mortality rates in Russia.
Age-standardized sex-specific male and female pancreatitis mortality data for the period 1970-2005 and data on overall alcohol consumption were analyzed by means ARIMA (autoregressive integrated moving average) time series analysis.
Alcohol consumption was significantly associated with both male and female pancreatitis mortality rates: a 1 liter increase in overall alcohol consumption would result in a 7.0% increase in the male pancreatitis mortality rate and in 2.3% increase in the female mortality rate. The results of the analysis suggest that 63.1% of all male pancreatitis deaths and 26.8% female deaths in Russia could be attributed to alcohol. Conclusions The outcomes of this study provide indirect support for the hypothesis that unfavorable mixture of higher overall level of alcohol consumption and binge drinking pattern is an important contributor to the pancreatitis mortality rate in Russian Federation.
PubMed ID
25076345 View in PubMed
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The effects of beverage type on suicide rate in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129733
Source
Psychiatr Danub. 2011 Dec;23(4):378-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Yury E Razvodovsky
Author Affiliation
Grodno State Medical University, 230009, Grodno, str. Gorky 80, Belarus. razvodovsky@tut.by
Source
Psychiatr Danub. 2011 Dec;23(4):378-83
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholic Beverages - supply & distribution - toxicity
Beer - supply & distribution - toxicity
Cause of Death
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethanol - supply & distribution - toxicity
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Russia - epidemiology
Statistics as Topic
Suicide - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Wine - supply & distribution - toxicity
Abstract
Research evidence has suggested that the consumption of different types of alcoholic beverage may have a differential effect on suicide rate. The aim of this study was to examine the relation between the consumption of different beverage types and suicide rates in Russia.
Age-standardized sex- and age-specific suicide rate for the period 1980-2005 and data on beverage-specific alcohol sale were obtained from the Russian State Statistical Committee. Time-series analytical modeling techniques (ARIMA) were used to examine the relationship between the sale of different alcoholic beverages and suicide rates.
Vodka consumption as measured by sale was significantly associated with both male and female suicide rate. The consumption of beer and wine were not associated with suicide rate. The estimates of the age specific models for men were positive (except for the 75+ age group) and ranging from 0.069 (60-74 age group) to 0.123 (30-44 age group). The estimates for women were positive for the 15-29 age group (0.08), 30-44 age group (0.096) and 45-59 age group (0.057).
These findings suggest that public health efforts should focus on both reducing overall consumption and changing beverage preference away from distilled spirits in order to reduce suicide rate in Russia.
PubMed ID
22075739 View in PubMed
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Estimation of alcohol attributable fraction of mortality in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121885
Source
Adicciones. 2012;24(3):247-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Yury E Razvodovsky
Author Affiliation
Grodno State Medical University, Belarus, Grodno, str. Gorky 80, 230008. razvodovsky@tut.by
Source
Adicciones. 2012;24(3):247-52
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - mortality
Cause of Death
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
Accumulated research evidence suggests that alcohol is a major contributor to premature deaths toll in Russia. The aim of the present study was to estimate the premature adult mortality attributable to alcohol abuse in Russia on the basis of aggregate-level data of all-cause mortality and alcohol consumption. With this purpose age-standardized sex-specific male and female all-cause mortality data for the period 1980-2005 and data on overall alcohol consumption were analyzed by means ARIMA time series analysis. As a result alcohol consumption was significantly associated with both male and female all-cause mortality rates: a 1 liter increase in overall alcohol consumption would result in a 3.9% increase in the male mortality rate and in 2.4% increase in female mortality rate. The results of the analysis also suggest that 41.1% of all male deaths and 27.8% female deaths in Russia could be attributed to alcohol. We can conclude that alcohol is a major contributor to the high mortality rate in Russian Federation. Therefore prevention of alcohol-attributable harm should be a major public health priority in Russia.
PubMed ID
22868980 View in PubMed
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Psychosocial distress as a risk factor of asthma mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142730
Source
Psychiatr Danub. 2010 Jun;22(2):167-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Yury E Razvodovsky
Author Affiliation
Grodno State Medical University, 230009, Grodno, Belarus. razvodovsky@tut.by
Source
Psychiatr Danub. 2010 Jun;22(2):167-72
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Asthma - mortality - psychology
Cause of Death - trends
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Psychophysiologic Disorders - mortality - psychology
Risk factors
Russia
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications
Suicide - trends
Abstract
Asthma is a mayor public health problems and its prevalence has risen in recent decades world wide. Various explanations have been proposed to explain this trend including air pollution, aeroallergens, diet, infections and tobacco smoke. However, focus on biological risk factors has not fully explained this trend. A mounting body of research evidence suggests that psychosocial stress is likely to be a factor contributing to the development of asthma. The aim of the present study was to estimate the effect of psychosocial distress on asthma mortality rate at the aggregate level.
Trends in age-adjusted, sex-specific suicide (as an integral indicator for psychosocial distress) and asthma mortality rate in Russia from 1975 to 2005 were analyzed employing an ARIMA analysis in order to asses bivariate relationship between the two time series.
Time series analysis indicates the presence of statistically significant association between the two time series both for males and females.
The findings of the present study add to the growing number of studies linking psychosocial distress to asthma expression and mortality. This paper presents new epidemiological evidence that supports psychosomatic concept of asthma.
PubMed ID
20562741 View in PubMed
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Psychosocial distress as a risk factor of ischemic heart disease mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115745
Source
Psychiatr Danub. 2013 Mar;25(1):68-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Yury E Razvodovsky
Author Affiliation
Grodno State Medical University, Grodno, Belarus. yury_razvodovsky@mail.ru
Source
Psychiatr Danub. 2013 Mar;25(1):68-75
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Male
Mortality - trends
Myocardial Ischemia - mortality - psychology
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Social Change
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - mortality - psychology
Suicide - trends
Abstract
Ischemic heart disease (IHD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the industrialized world. Recent research evidence suggests that psychosocial distress has been implicated as both a precursor to IHD and a significant risk factor for death in those with established IHD. According to WHO, psychosocial distress will be the most harmful risk factor for the development of IHD in the near future. Some experts have underlined the importance of the psychosocial distress of economic and political reforms as the main reason for the IHD mortality crisis in Russia in the 1990s. The aim of the present study was to estimate the effect of psychosocial distress on IHD mortality rate in Russia.
Trends in age-adjusted, sex-specific suicide (as an integral indicator for psychosocial distress) and IHD mortality rate in Russia from 1965 to 2005 were analyzed employing a distributed lags analysis in order to assess the bivariate relationship between the two time series.
Time series analysis indicates the presence of a statistically significant association between the two time series for males at lags 0 and females at lags 0 and 1.
These findings suggest that the Russian IHD mortality crisis is most likely to have been precipitated by the psychosocial distress imposed by rapid societal transformation. The experience of Russia should serve as an example of how societal-level change can influence the health of a population.
PubMed ID
23470609 View in PubMed
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Suicide and stomach ulcer mortality rate in Russia, 1965-2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162719
Source
Psychiatr Danub. 2007 Jun;19(1-2):35-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Yury E Razvodovsky
Author Affiliation
Grodno State Medical University, Belarus. razvodovsky@grsmu.by
Source
Psychiatr Danub. 2007 Jun;19(1-2):35-41
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Psychophysiologic Disorders - mortality - psychology
Risk
Russia
Sex Factors
Social Change
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics as Topic
Stomach Ulcer - mortality - psychology
Stress, Psychological - complications
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data - trends
Abstract
Peptic ulcer disease is a common clinical problem. The relationship between stress and ulcer has been shown in a large series of methodologically sound studies.
To estimate the effect of psychosocial distress on stomach ulcer mortality rate at the aggregate level.
Trends in age-adjusted, sex-specific suicide (as an integral indicator for psychosocial distress) and stomach ulcer mortality rate in Russia from 1965 to 2005 were analyzed employing an ARIMA analysis in order to assess the bivariate relationship between the two time series.
Time series analysis indicate the presence of a statistically significant association between the two time series for males (r=0.45; SE=0.16). The association between the two time series for females was also positive, however it was not statistically significant (r=0.25; SE=0.14).
The results of the present study suggest a positive association between male suicide and stomach ulcer mortality rate at the aggregate level. This paper presents new epidemiological evidence that supports the psychosomatic concept of stomach ulcer disease.
PubMed ID
17603414 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.