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Adolescent injury deaths and hospitalization in Canada: magnitude and temporal trends (1979-2003).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162925
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2007 Jul;41(1):84-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Sai Yi Pan
Marie Desmeules
Howard Morrison
Robert Semenciw
Anne-Marie Ugnat
Wendy Thompson
Yang Mao
Author Affiliation
Evidence and Risk Assessment Division, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Sai_Yi_Pan@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2007 Jul;41(1):84-92
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Wounds and Injuries - mortality
Abstract
To understand the magnitude and the national trends of mortality and hospitalization due to injuries among Canadian adolescents aged 15-19 years in 1979-2003.
Data on injury deaths and hospitalizations were obtained from the national Vital Statistical System and the Hospital Morbidity Database. Injuries were classified by intent and by mechanism.
In 15-19-year-olds, 75.6% of all deaths and 16.6% of all hospitalizations were attributed to injuries. Unintentional and self-inflicted injuries accounted for 70.2% and 24.1%, respectively, of total injury deaths as well as 72.6% and 17.4%, respectively, of total injury hospitalizations. The main causes for injury were motor vehicle traffic-related injury (MVT), suffocation, firearm, poisoning, and drowning for injury deaths; and MVT, poisoning, fall, struck by/against, and cut/pierce for injury hospitalizations. Mortality and hospitalization rates of total and unintentional injuries decreased substantially, whereas those of self-inflicted injuries decreased only slightly, with a small increase in females. Rates also decreased for all causes except suffocation, which showed an increasing trend. Males had higher rates for all intents and causes than females, except for self-inflicted injury hospitalization (higher in females). The territories and Prairie Provinces also had higher ones of total injuries and self-inflicted injuries than in other provinces.
Injury is the leading cause of deaths and a major source of hospitalizations in Canadian adolescents. However, prevention programs in Canada have made significant progress in reducing injury mortality and hospitalization. The graduated driver licensing, enforcement of seat-belt use, speed limit and alcohol control, and Canadian tough gun control may have contributed to the decline.
PubMed ID
17577538 View in PubMed
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Alcohol drinking and renal cell carcinoma in Canadian men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157674
Source
Cancer Detect Prev. 2008;32(1):7-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Jinfu Hu
Yue Chen
Yang Mao
Marie Desmeules
Les Mery
Author Affiliation
Evidence and Risk Assessment Division, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Public Health Agency of Canada, 120 Colonnade Road, AL 6701A, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Jinfu_Hu@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Cancer Detect Prev. 2008;32(1):7-14
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
Epidemiologic studies have reported that moderate alcohol consumption is inversely associated with the risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), but sex-specific results are inconsistent. The present study examines the association between alcohol intake and the risk of RCC among men and women.
Mailed questionnaires were completed by 1138 newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed RCC cases and 5039 population controls between 1994 and 1997 in eight Canadian provinces. A food frequency questionnaire provided data on eating habits and alcohol consumption 2 years before data collection. Other information included socio-economic status, lifestyle habits, alcohol use, and diet. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were derived through unconditional logistic regression.
Total alcohol intake was inversely associated with RCC in men and in women; the OR for the highest intake group (> or =22.3 g/day among men and > or =7.9 g/day among women) versus the non-drinkers was 0.7 (95% CI, 0.5-0.9) for both sexes. Analysis of menopausal status produced ORs for the highest intake group versus the non-drinkers of 1.2 (95% CI, 0.7-2.1) among premenopausal women and 0.6 (95% CI, 0.4-0.9) among postmenopausal women. Smoking and obesity were not important effect modifiers.
Moderate alcohol consumption may be associated with a decreased risk of RCC in men and in women (mainly postmenopausal women).
PubMed ID
18420355 View in PubMed
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An epidemiologic study of hepatocellular carcinoma in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187668
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Nov-Dec;93(6):443-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Susie elSaadany
Martin Tepper
Yang Mao
Robert Semenciw
Antonio Giulivi
Author Affiliation
Health-Care Acquired Infections Division, Health Canada. susie_elsaadany@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Nov-Dec;93(6):443-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Hepatitis B - epidemiology
Hepatitis C - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Least-Squares Analysis
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Prevalence
Registries
Sex Factors
Abstract
To provide information on poorly described Canadian hepatocellular cancer epidemiology, we analyzed incident cases abstracted from the Canadian Cancer Registration Database (1969-1997) and Canadian annual death data (1969-1998). Age, sex, geographic distribution, and secular trends were described. Projection models were developed for the next decade.
Results indicated much higher incidence and mortality rates in males than females, with substantial increases for both with age. Age-standardized incidence rates increased an average of 3.4% per year in males, 1.2% per year in females (1969-1997). Age-standardized mortality rates increased an average of 1.48% in males, but decreased an average of 0.46% per year in females (1969-1998). Join-point analysis of the linear trends in the age-standardized incidence and mortality rates suggested that a new trend started to emerge about 1991. The fitted non-linear multiplicative model predicted the occurrence of 1,565 new cases and 802 deaths in the year 2010. HCC incidence was the highest in British Colombia, followed by Quebec, and the lowest in the Atlantic region.
Incidence rates of hepatocellular carcinoma have increased substantially, consistent with the reported increase in the prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infections in recent decades.
PubMed ID
12448868 View in PubMed
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Assessment of dysglycemia risk in the Kitikmeot region of Nunavut: using the CANRISK tool.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281631
Source
Health Promot Chronic Dis Prev Can. 2017 Apr;37(4):114-122
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Ying Jiang
Susan Rogers Van Katwyk
Yang Mao
Heather Orpana
Gina Argwal
Margaret de Groh
Monique Skinner
Robyn Clarke
Howard Morrison
Source
Health Promot Chronic Dis Prev Can. 2017 Apr;37(4):114-122
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The Public Health Agency of Canada adapted a Finnish diabetes screening tool (FINDRISC) to create a tool (CANRISK) tailored to Canada's multi-ethnic population. CANRISK was developed using data collected in seven Canadian provinces. In an effort to extend the applicability of CANRISK to northern territorial populations, we completed a study with the mainly Inuit population in the Kitikmeot region of Nunavut.
We obtained CANRISK questionnaires, physical measures and blood samples from participants in five Nunavut communities in Kitikmeot. We used logistic regression to test model fit using the original CANRISK risk factors for dysglycemia (prediabetes and diabetes). Dysglycemia was assessed using fasting plasma glucose (FPG) alone and/or oral glucose tolerance test. We generated participants' CANRISK scores to test the functioning of this tool in the Inuit population.
A total of 303 individuals participated in the study. Half were aged less than 45 years, two-thirds were female and 84% were Inuit. A total of 18% had prediabetes, and an additional 4% had undiagnosed diabetes. The odds of having dysglycemia rose exponentially with age, while the relationship with BMI was U-shaped. Compared with lab test results, using a cut-off point of 32 the CANRISK tool achieved a sensitivity of 61%, a specificity of 66%, a positive predictive value of 34% and an accuracy rate of 65%.
The CANRISK tool achieved a similar accuracy in detecting dysglycemia in this mainly Inuit population as it did in a multi-ethnic sample of Canadians. We found the CANRISK tool to be adaptable to the Kitikmeot region, and more generally to Nunavut.
PubMed ID
28402800 View in PubMed
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Association between mental health and fall injury in Canadian immigrants and non-immigrants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112621
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2013 Oct;59:221-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Yue Chen
Frank Mo
Qilong Yi
Howard Morrison
Yang Mao
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8M5. Electronic address: ychen@uottawa.ca.
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2013 Oct;59:221-6
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Risk factors
Self Report
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The study was to determine the association between mental health and the incidence of injury among Canadian immigrants and non-immigrants. We used data from 15,405 individuals aged 12 years or more, who were living in British Columbia, Canada, and participated in the 2007-2008 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS). We calculated a 12-month cumulative incidence of fall injury based on self-reporting. Logistic regression model was used to examine the association of the 12-month cumulative incidence of fall injury with immigration status and mental health before and after adjustment for covariates. The results show that self-reported mood and anxiety disorders were significantly associated with an increased incidence of fall injury. The adjusted odds ratios were 1.81 (95% CI: 1.37, 2.38) for mood disorder and 1.55 (95% CI: 1.12, 2.13) for anxiety disorder. Immigrant status was a significant effect modifier for the association between mental health and fall injury, with stronger associations in immigrants than in non-immigrants especially in elderly people. People with poor self perceived health were more likely to have a fall injury. Both mental health and general health were related to fall injury. There was a stronger association between mental health and fall injury in immigrants compared with non-immigrants in the elderly. More attention should be paid to mental health in immigrants associated with fall injury.
PubMed ID
23810953 View in PubMed
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Association between obesity and depression in Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148332
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2009 Oct;18(10):1687-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Yue Chen
Ying Jiang
Yang Mao
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. ychen@uottawa.ca
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2009 Oct;18(10):1687-92
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Alberta - epidemiology
Body mass index
Body Weight
British Columbia - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Confidence Intervals
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's health
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine the age and sex variations in the associations between obesity and depression.
This analysis was based on data from 59,652 adults >or=18 years of age in the provinces of Nova Scotia, Quebec, Saskatchewan, Alberta, and British Columbia, who participated in the Canadian Community Health Survey conducted in 2005. The survey included a set of 27 questions about symptoms of depression, which were taken from the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Based on these questions, depression scores were calculated and used to define depression, which corresponds to a 90% likelihood of a positive diagnosis of major depressive episode. Body weight and height were based on self-report.
The prevalence of depression was 5.3% in adults living in the five provinces and was higher in women than in men. People with abnormal body weight tended to have an increased risk of depression. On average, obesity and being underweight were associated with approximately 30% and 40% increases in depression, respectively. Particularly in women, depression was more markedly associated with obesity in the 18-39 year age group (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.29-2.15) and with being underweight in the 40-59 year age group (OR 2.23, 95% CI 1.45-3.42) than other age groups.
Obesity is associated with an increased risk of depression in younger women.
PubMed ID
19785572 View in PubMed
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Association of obesity and cancer risk in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181860
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Feb 1;159(3):259-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2004
Author
Sai Yi Pan
Kenneth C Johnson
Anne-Marie Ugnat
Shi Wu Wen
Yang Mao
Author Affiliation
Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Population and Public Health Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Saiyi_Pan@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Feb 1;159(3):259-68
Date
Feb-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Confidence Intervals
Diet
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Obesity - complications
Population Surveillance - methods
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking
Somatomedins
Abstract
The authors conducted a population-based, case-control study of 21,022 incident cases of 19 types of cancer and 5,039 controls aged 20-76 years during 1994-1997 to examine the association between obesity and the risks of various cancers. Compared with people with a body mass index of less than 25 kg/m(2), obese (body mass index of > or = 30 kg/m(2)) men and women had an increased risk of overall cancer (multivariable adjusted odds ratio = 1.34, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.22, 1.48), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (odds ratio = 1.46, 95% CI: 1.24, 1.72), leukemia (odds ratio = 1.61, 95% CI: 1.32, 1.96), multiple myeloma (odds ratio = 2.06, 95% CI: 1.46, 2.89), and cancers of the kidney (odds ratio = 2.74, 95% CI: 2.30, 3.25), colon (odds ratio = 1.93, 95% CI: 1.61, 2.31), rectum (odds ratio = 1.65, 95% CI: 1.36, 2.00), pancreas (odds ratio = 1.51, 95% CI: 1.19, 1.92), breast (in postmenopausal women) (odds ratio = 1.66, 95% CI: 1.33, 2.06), ovary (odds ratio = 1.95, 95% CI: 1.44, 2.64), and prostate (odds ratio = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.09, 1.47). Overall, excess body mass accounted for 7.7% of all cancers in Canada-9.7% in men and 5.9% in women. This study provides further evidence that obesity increases the risk of overall cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, leukemia, multiple myeloma, and cancers of the kidney, colon, rectum, breast (in postmenopausal women), pancreas, ovary, and prostate.
PubMed ID
14742286 View in PubMed
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Avoidable mortality across Canada from 1975 to 1999.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169199
Source
BMC Public Health. 2006;6:137
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Paul D James
Doug G Manuel
Yang Mao
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Canada. paul.james@utoronto.ca
Source
BMC Public Health. 2006;6:137
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death - trends
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Geography
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Myocardial Ischemia - mortality
National Health Programs - standards - trends
Poisson Distribution
Wounds and Injuries - mortality
Abstract
The concept of 'avoidable' mortality (AM) has been proposed as a performance measure of health care systems. In this study we examined mortality in five geographic regions of Canada from 1975 to 1999 for previously defined avoidable disease groups that are amenable to medical care and public health. These trends were compared to mortality from other causes.
National and regional age-standardized mortality rates for ages less than 65 years were estimated for avoidable and other causes of death for consecutive periods (1975-1979, 1980-1985, 1985-1989, 1990-1994, and 1995-1999). The proportion of all-cause mortality attributable to avoidable causes was also determined.
From 1975-1979 to 1995-1999, the AM decrease (46.9%) was more pronounced compared to mortality from other causes (24.9%). There were persistent regional AM differences, with consistently lower AM in Ontario and British Columbia compared to the Atlantic, Quebec, and Prairies regions. This trend was not apparent when mortality from other causes was examined. Injuries, ischaemic heart disease, and lung cancer strongly influenced the overall AM trends.
The regional differences in mortality for ages less than 65 years was attributable to causes of death amenable to medical care and public health, especially from causes responsive to public health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16716230 View in PubMed
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Avoidable mortality in the United States and Canada, 1980-1996.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188792
Source
Am J Public Health. 2002 Sep;92(9):1481-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Douglas G Manuel
Yang Mao
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. doug.manuel@ices.on.ca
Source
Am J Public Health. 2002 Sep;92(9):1481-4
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Delivery of Health Care - standards
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Sentinel Surveillance
United States - epidemiology
Notes
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Comment In: Am J Public Health. 2003 Feb;93(2):186; author reply 186-712554564
PubMed ID
12197980 View in PubMed
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Brain cancer and occupational exposure to magnetic fields among men: results from a Canadian population-based case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190851
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2002 Feb;31(1):210-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Paul J Villeneuve
David A Agnew
Kenneth C Johnson
Yang Mao
Author Affiliation
Environmental Risk Assessment and Case Surveillance Division, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0L2. pvillene@uottawa.ca
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2002 Feb;31(1):210-7
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Astrocytoma - epidemiology
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Glioblastoma - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure
Abstract
The relationship between occupational exposure to magnetic fields and brain cancer in men was investigated using population-based case-control data collected in eight Canadian provinces. Emphasis was placed on examining the variations in risk across different histological types.
A list of occupations was compiled for 543 cases and 543 controls that were individually matched by age. Occupations were categorized according to their average magnetic field exposure through blinded expert review ( or = 0.6 microT). In total, 133 cases (14%) and 123 controls (12%) were estimated to have at least one occupation whereby magnetic field exposures exceeded 0.3 microT. Odds ratios (OR) were generated using conditional logistic regression, and were adjusted for suspected occupational risk factors for brain cancer.
A non-significantly increased risk of brain cancer was observed among men who had ever held a job with an average magnetic field exposure >0.6 microT relative to those with exposures
PubMed ID
11914323 View in PubMed
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47 records – page 1 of 5.