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Mortality during hospitalisation for pneumonia in Alberta, Canada, is associated with physician volume.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184302
Source
Eur Respir J. 2003 Jul;22(1):148-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
T J Marrie
K C Carriere
Y. Jin
D H Johnson
Author Affiliation
Dept of Medicine, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2003 Jul;22(1):148-55
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Community-Acquired Infections - mortality
Comorbidity
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Health Services Research
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Medicine
Middle Aged
Physicians - standards
Pneumonia - mortality
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Specialization
Abstract
The association of mortality with patient factors (severity of illness, comorbidity), physician factors (specialty training, prehospitalisation visit, in-hospital consultation, volume of patients seen per physician) and healthcare organisation factors (patient-travel distances, regional beds per capita, admitting hospital-bed occupancy, admitting hospital-bed turnover, hospital location, volume of pneumonia cases per hospital) after hospital admission with community-acquired pneumonia was investigated using administrative data from Alberta, Canada from April 1, 1994-March 31, 1999. During the 5-yr study period there were 43,642 pneumonia hospitalisations, with an 11% in-hospital and 26% 1-yr mortality. Patient severity of illness and comorbidity were the strongest predictors of increased mortality. Physicians with the highest in-hospital pneumonia patient volume (>27 patients x yr(-1)) cared for patients with greater severity/comorbidity, but with decreased odds of in-hospital mortality, compared with the lowest volume physicians (less than seven patients per year). The effects of internal medicine specialist or subspecialist care were mixed, with a reduction in deaths for the first 72 h and an increase in in-hospital deaths. Prehospitalisation visit by a physician was associated with decreased mortality. Healthcare organisation factors were the least strong predictor of mortality, demonstrating an effect only for 1-yr mortality in those discharged alive from hospital. Admissions to larger volume or metropolitan hospitals were associated with a decrease in mortality. Severity of illness and comorbidity had the strongest association with mortality. The first association of high-volume physician and pre-hospital care with decreased in-hospital mortality for community-acquired pneumonia is reported.
PubMed ID
12882465 View in PubMed
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A prospective cohort study of patients with transient ischemic attack to identify high-risk clinical characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106027
Source
Stroke. 2014 Jan;45(1):92-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Jeffrey J Perry
Mukul Sharma
Marco L A Sivilotti
Jane Sutherland
Andrew Worster
Marcel Émond
Grant Stotts
Albert Y Jin
Wieslaw J Oczkowski
Demetrios J Sahlas
Heather E Murray
Ariane MacKey
Steve Verreault
George A Wells
Ian G Stiell
Author Affiliation
From the Departments of Emergency Medicine (J.J.P., I.G.S.) and Epidemiology and Community Medicine (G.A.W.) and Division of Neurology (G.S.), University of Ottawa, Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (J.J.P., J.S., I.G.S.); Departments of Emergency Medicine (M.L.A.S., H.E.M.) and Biomedical and Molecular Sciences (M.L.A.S.) and Division of Neurology (A.Y.J.), Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada; Department of Emergency Medicine, Université Laval, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada (M.É.); Divisions of Emergency Medicine (A.W.) and Neurology (M.S., W.J.O, D.J.S.), McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; and Department of Neurology, Hôpital de l'Enfant-Jesus, Quebec City, Quebec, Quebec, Canada (A.M., S.V.).
Source
Stroke. 2014 Jan;45(1):92-100
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Cohort Studies
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Ischemic Attack, Transient - diagnosis - psychology
Language Disorders - etiology
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Neurologic Examination
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
ROC Curve
Resource Allocation
Risk assessment
Stroke - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The occurrence of a transient ischemic attack (TIA) increases an individual's risk for subsequent stroke. The objectives of this study were to determine clinical features of patients with TIA associated with impending (=7 days) stroke and to develop a clinical prediction score for impending stroke.
We conducted a prospective cohort study at 8 Canadian emergency departments for 5 years. We enrolled patients with a new TIA. Our outcome was subsequent stroke within 7 days of TIA diagnosis.
We prospectively enrolled 3906 patients, of which 86 (2.2%) experienced a stroke within 7 days. Clinical features strongly correlated with having an impending stroke included first-ever TIA, language disturbance, longer duration, weakness, gait disturbance, elevated blood pressure, atrial fibrillation on ECG, infarction on computed tomography, and elevated blood glucose. Variables less associated with having an impending stroke included vertigo, lightheadedness, and visual loss. From this cohort, we derived the Canadian TIA Score which identifies the risk of subsequent stroke=7 days and consists of 13 variables. This model has good discrimination with a c-statistic of 0.77 (95% confidence interval, 0.73-0.82).
Patients with TIA with their first TIA, language disturbance, duration of symptoms=10 minutes, gait disturbance, atrial fibrillation, infarction on computed tomography, elevated platelets or glucose, unilateral weakness, history of carotid stenosis, and elevated diastolic blood pressure are at higher risk for an impending stroke. Patients with vertigo and no high-risk features are at low risk. The Canadian TIA Score quantifies the impending stroke risk following TIA.
Notes
Comment In: Stroke. 2014 May;45(5):e8724723317
Comment In: Stroke. 2014 May;45(5):e8824723315
PubMed ID
24262323 View in PubMed
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Prospective validation of the ABCD2 score for patients in the emergency department with transient ischemic attack.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133925
Source
CMAJ. 2011 Jul 12;183(10):1137-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-12-2011
Author
Jeffrey J Perry
Mukul Sharma
Marco L A Sivilotti
Jane Sutherland
Cheryl Symington
Andrew Worster
Marcel Émond
Grant Stotts
Albert Y Jin
Weislaw J Oczkowski
Demetrios J Sahlas
Heather E Murray
Ariane MacKey
Steve Verreault
George A Wells
Ian G Stiell
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ont. jperry@ohri.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2011 Jul 12;183(10):1137-45
Date
Jul-12-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood pressure
Canada
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis
Early Diagnosis
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Humans
Ischemic Attack, Transient - diagnosis
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Probability
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
ROC Curve
Risk Assessment - methods
Sensitivity and specificity
Stroke - diagnosis
Time Factors
Triage - methods
Abstract
The ABCD2 score (Age, Blood pressure, Clinical features, Duration of symptoms and Diabetes) is used to identify patients having a transient ischemic attack who are at high risk for imminent stroke. However, despite its widespread implementation, the ABCD2 score has not yet been prospectively validated. We assessed the accuracy of the ABCD2 score for predicting stroke at 7 (primary outcome) and 90 days.
This prospective cohort study enrolled adults from eight Canadian emergency departments who had received a diagnosis of transient ischemic attack. Physicians completed data forms with the ABCD2 score before disposition. The outcome criterion, stroke, was established by a treating neurologist or by an Adjudication Committee. We calculated the sensitivity and specificity for predicting stroke 7 and 90 days after visiting the emergency department using the original "high-risk" cutpoint of an ABCD2 score of more than 5, and the American Heart Association recommendation of a score of more than 2.
We enrolled 2056 patients (mean age 68.0 yr, 1046 (50.9%) women) who had a rate of stroke of 1.8% at 7 days and 3.2% at 90 days. An ABCD2 score of more than 5 had a sensitivity of 31.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 19.1-47.5) for stroke at 7 days and 29.2% (95% CI 19.6-41.2) for stroke at 90 days. An ABCD2 score of more than 2 resulted in sensitivity of 94.7% (95% CI 82.7-98.5) for stroke at 7 days with a specificity of 12.5% (95% CI 11.2-14.1). The accuracy of the ABCD2 score as calculated by either the enrolling physician (area under the curve 0.56; 95% CI 0.47-0.65) or the coordinating centre (area under the curve 0.65; 95% CI 0.57-0.73) was poor.
This multicentre prospective study involving patients in emergency departments with transient ischemic attack found the ABCD2 score to be inaccurate, at any cut-point, as a predictor of imminent stroke. Furthermore, the ABCD2 score of more than 2 that is recommended by the American Heart Association is nonspecific.
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2011 Jul 12;183(10):1127-821646467
Comment In: Praxis (Bern 1994). 2012 Jan 18;101(2):135-622252597
PubMed ID
21646462 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2001 Feb;46(1):45-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
A H Thompson
A W Howard
Y. Jin
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, 13-103 Clinical Sciences Building, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2G3. gus.thompson@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2001 Feb;46(1):45-51
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Incidence
Social Problems - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To construct an index that represents the general level of social problems among Canadian provinces and territories.
Factor weights were used to combine provincial and territorial rates for homicide, attempted murder, assault, sexual assault, robbery, divorce, suicide, and alcoholism into a single Social Problem Index.
The resulting index demonstrated strong positive intercorrelations among its factors across provinces. That is, provinces that showed high rates on one factor tended to show high rates on the others as well. The validity of the Social Problem Index is demonstrated by its positive correlation with an independent measure of the likelihood of having experienced personal trauma.
The robust nature and apparent validity of the Social Problem Index suggest that it can be well used for needs assessments and theoretical studies and as a feedback mechanism to national, provincial, and community leaders on the social problem status of their particular jurisdictions.
PubMed ID
11221489 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2001 Mar;67(3):131
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
E Y Jin
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2001 Mar;67(3):131
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Dentist-Patient Relations
Health Policy
Humans
Smoking Cessation
Taxes
PubMed ID
11315388 View in PubMed
Less detail

Variation in management of community-acquired pneumonia requiring admission to Alberta, Canada hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186435
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2003 Feb;130(1):41-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Y. Jin
T J Marrie
K C Carriere
G. Predy
C. Houston
K. Ness
D H Johnson
Author Affiliation
Information Analysis, Alberta Health and Wellness, Canada.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2003 Feb;130(1):41-51
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Community-Acquired Infections - economics - epidemiology - mortality - pathology - prevention & control
Female
Hospital Costs
Hospital Mortality
Hospitals - classification - utilization
Hospitals, Rural - economics - utilization
Hospitals, Urban - economics - utilization
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Pneumonia - economics - epidemiology - mortality - pathology - prevention & control
Seasons
Severity of Illness Index
Small-Area Analysis
Utilization Review
Abstract
Previous studies have shown small area variation in the rate of admission to hospital for patients with community-acquired pneumonia. We determined the rates of admission and length of stay for patients with community-acquired pneumonia in Alberta and the factors influencing admission rates and length of stay. Using hospital abstracts, hospital admissions for community-acquired pneumonia from 1 April 1994 to 31 March 1999 were compared. We classified Alberta hospitals according to geographical regions, by the number of beds, and by number of community-acquired pneumonia cases. There were 12,000 annual hospital discharges for community-acquired pneumonia costing over $40 million per year. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 12% and the 1 year mortality rate was 26%. Compared with rural hospitals, regional and metropolitan hospitals admitted patients with greater severity of illness as demonstrated by greater in-hospital mortality, cost per case and comorbidity. Age-sex adjusted hospital discharge rates were significantly below the provincial average in both urban regions. Hospital discharge rates for residents in all rural regions and 4 of 5 regions with a regional hospital were significantly higher than the provincial average. After adjusting for comorbidity, the relative risk for a longer length of stay was 22% greater in regional hospitals and about 30% greater in urban hospitals compared to rural hospitals. Seasonal variation in the admission rate was evident, with higher rates in the winter of each year. We conclude that rural hospitals would be likely to benefit from a protocol to help with the admission decision and urban hospitals from a programme to reduce length of stay.
PubMed ID
12613744 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.