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Source
Appl Radiat Isot. 2000 May;52(5):1165-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
J. Takada
M. Hoshi
S. Endo
V F Stepanenko
A E Kondrashov
D. Petin
V. Skvortsov
A. Ivannikov
D. Tikounov
Y. Gavrilin
V P Snykov
Author Affiliation
Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Japan. jtakada@ipc.hiroshima-u.ac.jp
Source
Appl Radiat Isot. 2000 May;52(5):1165-9
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Humans
Prospective Studies
Radioactive Hazard Release
Radiometry - methods
Russia
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Time Factors
Ukraine
Abstract
Dosimetry studies in Zaborie, a territory in Russia highly contaminated by the Chernobyl accident, were carried out in July, 1997. Studies on dosimetry for people are important not only for epidemiology but also for recovery of local social activity. The local contamination of the soil was measured to be 1.5-6.3 MBq/m2 of Cs-137 with 0.7-4 microSv/h of dose rate. A case study for a villager presently 40 years old indicates estimations of 72 and 269 mSv as the expected internal and external doses during 50 years starting in 1997 based on data of a whole-body measurement of Cs-137 and environmental dose rates. Mean values of accumulated external and internal doses for the period from the year 1986 till 1996 are also estimated to be 130 mSv and 16 mSv for Zaborie. The estimation of the 1986-1996 accumulated dose on the basis of large scale ESR teeth enamel dosimetry provides for this village, the value of 180 mSv. For a short term visitor from Japan to this area, external and internal dose are estimated to be 0.13 mSv/9d (during visit in 1997) and 0.024 mSv/50y (during 50 years starting from 1997), respectively.
PubMed ID
10836424 View in PubMed
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Thyroid cancer among Ukrainians and Belarusians who were children or adolescents at the time of the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16430
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2006 Mar;26(1):51-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
P. Jacob
T I Bogdanova
E. Buglova
M. Chepurniy
Y. Demidchik
Y. Gavrilin
J. Kenigsberg
J. Kruk
C. Schotola
S. Shinkarev
M D Tronko
S. Vavilov
Author Affiliation
GSF-Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg, Germany.
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2006 Mar;26(1):51-67
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Our objective is to assess the regional and temporal dependences of the baseline cases contributing to thyroid cancer incidence among those exposed in childhood or during adolescence in Belarus and Ukraine after the Chernobyl accident. Data are analysed for Kyiv and Sevastopol City and the 25 oblasts (regions) in Ukraine, and for Minsk and Gomel City and the 6 oblasts in Belarus. Average thyroid doses due to the Chernobyl accident were assessed for every birth year in the period from 1968 to 1985. Case data pertain to people who underwent surgical removal of thyroid cancers during the period 1986 to 2001 and who were allocated to their place of residence at the time of the accident. The 35 oblasts/cities were subdivided into an upper, middle and lower group of baseline thyroid cancer incidence. Poisson regressions were performed to estimate age, time and gender dependences of the baseline incidence rates in the three groups. The majority of oblasts/cities with high average doses and the majority of Belarusian oblasts/cities belong to the upper group of baseline thyroid cancer incidence. The baseline in the upper group is estimated to be larger than in the middle group by a factor of 2.3, and by a factor of 4.0 when compared to the lower group. The baseline incidence increases with age and with time since exposure. Estimated baseline incidence rates were found to increase from 1988 to 1999 by factors of three and two for the upper and the two lower groups respectively. The estimated thyroid cancer incidence rates in Belarus and Ukraine, and their dependences on gender and age, are consistent with observed rates found in the larger cancer registries of other countries. In conclusion, the baseline cases are found to contribute about 70% to the thyroid cancer incidence in Ukraine, and about 40% to the incidence in Belarus.
PubMed ID
16522944 View in PubMed
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Thyroid cancer risk in areas of Ukraine and Belarus affected by the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16552
Source
Radiat Res. 2006 Jan;165(1):1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
P. Jacob
T I Bogdanova
E. Buglova
M. Chepurniy
Y. Demidchik
Y. Gavrilin
J. Kenigsberg
R. Meckbach
C. Schotola
S. Shinkarev
M D Tronko
A. Ulanovsky
S. Vavilov
L. Walsh
Author Affiliation
GSF-Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg, Germany. Jacob@gsf.de
Source
Radiat Res. 2006 Jan;165(1):1-8
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - toxicity
Body Burden
Byelarus - epidemiology
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Power Plants
Prevalence
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology
Time Factors
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to analyze the thyroid cancer incidence risk after the Chernobyl accident and its degree of dependence on time and age. Data were analyzed for 1034 settlements in Ukraine and Belarus, in which more than 10 measurements of the (131)I content in human thyroids had been performed in May/June 1986. Thyroid doses due to the Chernobyl accident were assessed for the birth years 1968-1985 and related to thyroid cancers that were surgically removed during the period 1990-2001. The central estimate for the linear coefficient of the EAR dose response was 2.66 (95% CI: 2.19; 3.13) cases per 10(4) PY-Gy; for the quadratic coefficient, it was -0.145 (95% CI: -0.171; -0.119) cases per 10(4) PY-Gy(2). The EAR was found to be higher for females than for males by a factor of 1.4. It decreased with age at exposure and increased with age attained. The central estimate for the linear coefficient of the ERR dose response was 18.9 (95% CI: 11.1; 26.7) Gy(-1); for the quadratic coefficient, it was -1.03 (95% CI: -1.46; -0.60) Gy(-2). The ERR was found to be smaller for females than for males by a factor of 3.8 and decreased strongly with age at exposure. Both EAR and ERR were higher in the Belarusian settlements than in the Ukrainian settlements. In contrast to ERR, EAR increases with time after exposure. At the end of the observation period, excess risk estimates were found to be close to those observed in a major pooled analysis of seven studies of childhood thyroid cancer after external exposures.
PubMed ID
16392956 View in PubMed
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