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Defining the need for radiotherapy for lung cancer in the general population: a criterion-based, benchmarking approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183660
Source
Med Care. 2003 Sep;41(9):1074-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Lisa Barbera
Jina Zhang-Salomons
Jenny Huang
Scott Tyldesley
William Mackillop
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen's Cancer Research Institute, Kingston Regional Cancer Centre, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Med Care. 2003 Sep;41(9):1074-85
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Benchmarking
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung - radiotherapy
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - radiotherapy
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Ontario - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Radiation Oncology - economics - statistics & numerical data
Radiotherapy - utilization
SEER Program
United States - epidemiology
Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
We have previously used an evidence-based, epidemiologic approach to estimate the proportion of incident cases that should be treated with radiotherapy (RT) for lung cancer. The first objective of the present study was to compare this evidence-based estimate of the appropriate rate of use of RT with the rates observed in selected "benchmark" communities where there are no barriers to the appropriate use of RT and no incentives to the unnecessary use of RT. The second objective of the study was to compare the rates of use of RT in the general populations in the United States and Canada with the estimated appropriate rate.
We established benchmark rates for the use of RT for lung cancer in Ontario, Canada, where: 1) residents make no direct payments for RT; 2) all RT is provided by site-specialized radiation oncologists in multidisciplinary cancer centers, and 3) radiation oncologists receive a salary in lieu of technical fees. Communities located close to cancer centers without long waiting lists for RT were selected to serve as benchmarks. Prospectively gathered electronic treatment records from all RT cancer centers were linked to the provincial cancer registry to describe the rate of use of RT in Ontario. The public use file of Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Registries (SEER) was used to describe the use of RT in the United States.
Overall, 41.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 39.9%, 42.7%) of incident cases of lung cancer received RT as part of their initial management in the benchmark communities compared with the evidence-based estimate of 41.6% (95% CI, 39.2%, 44.1%). The rate of use of RT in the initial management of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the benchmark communities was 49.3% (95% CI, 47.5%, 51.1%) compared with the evidence-based estimate of 45.9% (95% CI, 41.6%, 50.2%). The use of RT in the initial management of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) in the benchmark communities was 47.0% (95% CI, 43.3%, 50.7%) compared with the evidence-based estimate of 45.4% (95% CI, 42.4%, 48.4%). In many counties of Ontario, the observed rates of RT use in the initial management of lung cancer were significantly lower than either the benchmark rate or the evidence-based estimate of the appropriate rate. In contrast, rates of use of RT in most counties in the SEER regions of the United States were close to, or higher than, the estimated appropriate rate.
The observed benchmark rate converged on the evidence-based estimate of the appropriate rate of use of RT for lung cancer, suggesting that either measure might reasonably be used as a "standard" against which to compare rates observed in similar populations elsewhere.
PubMed ID
12972847 View in PubMed
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Estimating the need for radiotherapy for patients with prostate, breast, and lung cancers: verification of model estimates of need with radiotherapy utilization data from British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142382
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2011 Apr 1;79(5):1507-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2011
Author
Scott Tyldesley
Geoff Delaney
Farshad Foroudi
Lisa Barbera
Marc Kerba
William Mackillop
Author Affiliation
Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, Canada. styldesl@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2011 Apr 1;79(5):1507-15
Date
Apr-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benchmarking - methods - standards
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - radiotherapy
British Columbia - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - radiotherapy
Male
Needs Assessment
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - radiotherapy
Radiotherapy - utilization
Abstract
Estimates of the need for radiotherapy (RT) using different methods (criterion based benchmarking [CBB] and the Canadian [C-EBEST] and Australian [A-EBEST] epidemiologically based estimates) exist for various cancer sites. We compared these model estimates to actual RT rates for lung, breast, and prostate cancers in British Columbia (BC).
All cases of lung, breast, and prostate cancers in BC from 1997 to 2004 and all patients receiving RT within 1 year (RT(1Y)) and within 5 years (RT(5Y)) of diagnosis were identified. The RT(1Y) and RT(5Y) proportions in health regions with a cancer center for the most recent year were then calculated. RT rates were compared with CBB and EBEST estimates of RT needs. Variation was assessed by time and region.
The RT(1Y) in regions with a cancer center for lung, breast, and prostate cancers were 51%, 58%, and 33% compared with 45%, 57%, and 32% for C-EBEST and 41%, 61%, and 37% for CBB models. The RT(5Y) rates in regions with a cancer center for lung, breast, and prostate cancers were 59%, 61%, and 40% compared with 61%, 66%, and 61% for C-EBEST and 75%, 83%, and 60% for A-EBEST models. The RT(1Y) rates increased for breast and prostate cancers.
C-EBEST and CBB model estimates are closer to the actual RT rates than the A-EBEST estimates. Application of these model estimates by health care decision makers should be undertaken with an understanding of the methods used and the assumptions on which they were based.
PubMed ID
20605338 View in PubMed
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Perioperative care of patients with obstructive sleep apnea - a survey of Canadian anesthesiologists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170328
Source
Can J Anaesth. 2006 Mar;53(3):299-304
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Kim Turner
Elizabeth VanDenkerkhof
Miu Lam
William Mackillop
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesiology, Kingston General Hospital, Ontario, Canada. turnerk@kgh.kari.net
Source
Can J Anaesth. 2006 Mar;53(3):299-304
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesiology - methods - standards
Canada
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Male
Perioperative Care - methods - standards
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - therapy
Abstract
At present, there are no guidelines and insufficient evidence to guide the decision-making of anesthesiologists in the perioperative care of patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The purpose of this study was to examine the current perioperative care provided, and to obtain opinions from anesthesiologists regarding evidence/consensus based guidelines to assist them in providing care to patients with OSA.
Canadian anesthesiologists were sent a postal questionnaire examining their opinions and perioperative care of patients with OSA. Respondents were asked to indicate the postoperative monitoring they would most likely select for two clinical scenarios, representing administration of a general and regional anesthetic, which was altered to reflect: treatment of OSA; use of postoperative opioids; presence of morbid obesity; and increased severity of OSA.
The survey had a response rate of 70% (746/1,063). Sixty-seven percent of respondents provided perioperative care to one to five patients with OSA per month, and 72% reported not having departmental policies for care of OSA patients. Ninety-two percent reported asking patients about OSA preoperatively. There was >or= 75% respondent agreement in two of the five alterations of the general anesthesia case scenario and in none of the alterations of the regional anesthesia case scenario. Eighty-two percent reported that guidelines would assist them in caring for patients with OSA.
This study demonstrates a variation amongst anesthesiologists in their postoperative monitoring of patients with OSA. The majority surveyed do not have departmental policies, and believed that guidelines would assist them in providing care to patients with OSA.
PubMed ID
16527797 View in PubMed
Less detail

Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in Ontario, Canada, and in southeastern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18528
Source
Laryngoscope. 2003 Apr;113(4):695-701
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Stephen F Hall
Morten Boysen
Patti A Groome
William Mackillop
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology and Oncology of the Queen's Cancer Research Unit, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Laryngoscope. 2003 Apr;113(4):695-701
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - mortality - pathology - therapy
Catchment Area (Health)
Databases
Female
Head and Neck Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - therapy
Humans
Male
Neoplasm Staging
Norway - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Survival Rate
Abstract
OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Reports comparing case mix, treatments, and outcomes between different countries are uncommon in head and neck oncology. Prospective databases of unselected patients from regional cancer centers in southeastern Ontario, Canada, and southeastern Norway were compared. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective comparative study of two prospective databases. METHODS: The case mix, treatments, and disease-specific mortality were compared using frequency tables, Kaplan-Meier survival curves, and the log rank test.RESULTSThe case mix, except for differences in oral cavity, oropharynx, and the recorded tumor (T) category, was similar, and the treatments were different. There was no statistical difference in overall survival for all patients, as well as for some sites. CONCLUSIONS: The results of treatments, based on different overall treatment polices, for all patients were similar. The differences in recorded T category with no statistical difference in overall survival suggest a difference in staging assignment and raises a question about the reliability of the TNM staging process.
PubMed ID
12671431 View in PubMed
Less detail

Using cancer registry data for survival studies: the example of the Ontario Cancer Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171487
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2006 Jan;59(1):67-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Stephen Hall
Karleen Schulze
Patti Groome
William Mackillop
Eric Holowaty
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen's Cancer Research Institute, 10 Stuart St, Kingston Ontario K7L 3N6, Canada. sfh@post.queensu.ca
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2006 Jan;59(1):67-76
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Cause of Death
Data Collection - standards
Head and Neck Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Humans
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Neoplasms, Multiple Primary - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Ontario
Registries - standards
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The Ontario Cancer Registry (OCR) is a population-based tumor registry created to provide data for epidemiologic research and for cancer surveillance. Recently it has been used for health services research. The objective of this project was to assess the quality of the OCR data that is used in survival analysis.
Clinical information for 898 patients with squamous carcinoma of the head and neck including index tumor site, date of diagnosis, vital status, date of death, and cause of death from a prospective database at the Kingston Regional Cancer Center is compared to the same data elements in the OCR for the same patients.
There is no statistically significant difference in disease-specific survival between the information from the two databases (log rank P = .89). The OCR captured and correctly assigned index tumor site for 81.4% (detection rate). The site assignment was accurate 90.9% of the time (confirmation rate), there was agreement on vital status (dead vs. alive) for all but one patient, and there was excellent agreement on date of death. However, cause of death (cancer vs. noncancer) based on death certificates had a 31% error rate.
Researchers can be confident in the survival analysis generated from data in this registry, but need to be aware of potential sources of error.
PubMed ID
16360563 View in PubMed
Less detail