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The acceptability of isoflavones as a treatment of menopausal symptoms: a European survey among postmenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70456
Source
Climacteric. 2005 Sep;8(3):230-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
C. Koebnick
M. Reimann
A. Carlsohn
S. Korzen-Bohr
S. Bügel
J. Hallund
L. Rossi
F. Branca
W. Hall
C. Williams
H-J F Zunft
K. O'Doherty Jensen
Author Affiliation
German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Department of Intervention Studies, Nuthethal, Germany.
Source
Climacteric. 2005 Sep;8(3):230-42
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Supplements
Europe
Female
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Isoflavones - therapeutic use
Life Style
Menopause
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Phytotherapy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vitamins - therapeutic use
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate determinants of the acceptability of isoflavone products among postmenopausal women with regard to social and lifestyle factors, dietary habits, health concerns, food beliefs, menopausal symptoms and therapies, and to elucidate preferences for specific products. METHODS: A consumer survey was conducted among postmenopausal women in four European countries (Germany, Denmark, Italy and the UK), including a total of 465 respondents. RESULTS: The declared acceptability of isoflavones was highest in Germany (80%), followed by Italy (75%), the UK (59%) and Denmark (55%; p
PubMed ID
16390755 View in PubMed
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Source
Lancet. 1996 Nov 9;348(9037):1258
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-9-1996
Author
W. Hall
C. Sannibale
Author Affiliation
National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales. Sydney, Australia.
Source
Lancet. 1996 Nov 9;348(9037):1258
Date
Nov-9-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adoption
Adult
Age of Onset
Alcoholism - classification - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Humans
Male
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
8909376 View in PubMed
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Assessment of physician performance in Alberta: the physician achievement review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201357
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Jul 13;161(1):52-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-13-1999
Author
W. Hall
C. Violato
R. Lewkonia
J. Lockyer
H. Fidler
J. Toews
P. Jennett
M. Donoff
D. Moores
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alta.
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Jul 13;161(1):52-7
Date
Jul-13-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Humans
Medical Audit - methods
Multivariate Analysis
Patient satisfaction
Peer Review, Health Care - methods
Physicians - standards
Pilot Projects
Program Development
Psychometrics - methods
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta, in collaboration with the Universities of Calgary and Alberta, has developed a program to routinely assess the performance of physicians, intended primarily for quality improvement in medical practice. The Physician Achievement Review (PAR) provides a multidimensional view of performance through structured feedback to physicians. The program will also provide a new mechanism for identifying physicians for whom more detailed assessment of practice performance or medical competence may be needed. Questionnaires were created to assess an array of performance attributes, and then appropriate assessors were designated--the physician himself or herself (self-evaluation), patients, medical peers, consultants and referring physicians, and non-physician coworkers. A pilot study with 308 physician volunteers was used to evaluate the psychometric and statistical properties of the questionnaires and to develop operating policies. The pilot surveys showed good statistical validity and technical reliability of the PAR questionnaires. For only 28 (9.1%) of the physicians were the PAR results more than one standard deviation from the peer group means for 3 or more of the 5 major domains of assessment (self, patients, peers, consultants and coworkers). In post-survey feedback, two-thirds of the physicians indicated that they were considering or had implemented changes to their medical practice on the basis of their PAR data. The estimated operating cost of the PAR program is approximately $200 per physician. In February 1999, on the basis of the operating experience and the results of the pilot survey, the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta implemented this innovative program, in which all Alberta physicians will be required to participate every 5 years.
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 1999 Jul 13;161(1):44-510420865
Comment In: CMAJ. 2000 Jun 27;162(13):180310906910
PubMed ID
10420867 View in PubMed
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Comparing circular and network buffers to examine the influence of land use on walking for leisure and errands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161187
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2007;6:41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Lisa N Oliver
Nadine Schuurman
Alexander W Hall
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada. loliver@sfu.ca
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2007;6:41
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
City Planning
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Geographic Information Systems
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Leisure Activities
Male
Middle Aged
Residence Characteristics
Transportation
Urban Population
Walking
Abstract
There is increasing interest in examining the influence of the built environment on physical activity. High-resolution data in a geographic information system is increasingly being used to measure salient aspects of the built environment and studies often use circular or road network buffers to measure land use around an individual's home address. However, little research has examined the extent to which the selection of circular or road network buffers influences the results of analysis. The objective of this study is to examine the influence of land use type (residential, commercial, recreational and park land and institutional land) on 'walking for leisure' and 'walking for errands' using 1 km circular and line-based road network buffers. Data on individual walking patterns is obtained from a survey of 1311 respondents in greater Vancouver and respondent's postal code centroids were used to construct the individual buffers. Logistic regression was used for statistical analysis.
Using line-based road network buffers, increasing proportion of institutional land significantly reduced the odds of 'walking for leisure 15 minutes or less per day' no significant results were found for circular buffers. A greater proportion of residential land significantly increased the odds of 'walking for errands less than 1 hour per week' for line-based road network buffer while no significant results for circular buffers. An increased proportion of commercial land significantly decreased the odds of 'walking for errands less than 1 hour per week' for both circular and line-based road network buffers.
The selection of network or circular buffers has a considerable influence on the results of analysis. Land use characteristics generally show greater associations with walking using line-based road network buffers than circular buffers. These results show that researchers need to carefully consider the most appropriate buffer with which to calculate land use characteristics.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17883870 View in PubMed
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The development of a computerized hospital pharmacy workload measurement reporting system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231387
Source
Can J Hosp Pharm. 1989 Feb;42(1):31-6, xiii
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1989

Endemic human T cell leukemia virus type II infection in southwestern US Indians involves two prototype variants of virus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220365
Source
J Infect Dis. 1993 Sep;168(3):737-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
B. Hjelle
S W Zhu
H. Takahashi
S. Ijichi
W W Hall
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Pathology, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque 87131.
Source
J Infect Dis. 1993 Sep;168(3):737-40
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Base Sequence
Female
Gene Products, env - genetics
Genetic Variation
HTLV-II Infections - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Human T-lymphotropic virus 2 - genetics
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Sequence Data
New Mexico - epidemiology
Retroviridae Proteins, Oncogenic - genetics
Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - complications - ethnology
env Gene Products, Human Immunodeficiency Virus
Abstract
Human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV) type II is endemic in certain American Indians, and high rates of infection occur in intravenous drug users (IVDUs). North American IVDUs are infected with two distinct variants, HTLV-IIa and -IIb. If IVDUs became infected as a result of interaction with members of an American Indian population, both viral forms should be demonstrable in such populations. Nucleotide sequence analysis of 630 bases of the env gene encoding the gp21 protein was done on DNA from 12 New Mexico Indians (8 Pueblo, 4 Navajo). All samples were typical subtype a or b viruses. Seven of the 8 Pueblo and 2 of 4 Navajo had subtype b; the rest had subtype a. The results are compatible with an indigenous New World origin for both subtypes of HTLV-II.
PubMed ID
8354915 View in PubMed
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High rate of human T lymphotropic virus type IIa infection in HIV type 1-infected intravenous drug abusers in Ireland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7594
Source
AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses. 1999 May 20;15(8):699-705
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-1999
Author
J F Egan
B. O'Leary
M J Lewis
F. Mulcahy
N. Sheehy
H. Hasegawa
F. Fitzpatrick
J J O'Connor
J. O'Riordan
W W Hall
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology, University College Dublin, Belfield, Ireland.
Source
AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses. 1999 May 20;15(8):699-705
Date
May-20-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blotting, Western
DNA, Viral - analysis
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
HIV Infections - complications - epidemiology
HIV-1
HTLV-II Antibodies - blood
HTLV-II Infections - complications - epidemiology - virology
Human T-lymphotropic virus 2 - classification - genetics - immunology
Humans
Ireland - epidemiology
Male
Phylogeny
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - complications - epidemiology
Terminal Repeat Sequences - genetics
Viral Envelope Proteins - genetics
Abstract
Serological and molecular analyses of a cohort of HIV-1-infected intravenous drug abusers (IVDAs) (n = 103) in Dublin, Ireland have demonstrated that 15 of 103 (14.6%) were infected with HTLV-II, which is the highest infection rate yet recorded for any European country. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the env region of the provirus demonstrated that the infection involved only the HTLV-IIa subtype; the HTLV-IIb subtype was not detected. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the long terminal repeat (LTR) confirmed infection with the HTLV-IIa subtype, and demonstrated that the viruses clustered closely with HTLV-IIa isolates from North American IVDAs. Previous observations that IVDAs in southern Europe, specifically Spain and Italy, appear to be infected predominantly with the HTLV-IIb subtype, along with the present report and evidence that IVDAs in Sweden are infected with the HTLV-IIa subtype, suggest different origins of HTLV-II infection in Europe.
PubMed ID
10357465 View in PubMed
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Intake of brassicaceous vegetables in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249093
Source
Can J Public Health. 1978 Jan-Feb;69(1):64-6
Publication Type
Article

Medical care of the alcoholic patient.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111732
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Aug 27;95(9):407-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-27-1966
Author
W. Boothroyd
G. Bell
G H Ettinger
W. Hall
I. Hilliard
I. Macdonald
J L Silversides
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Aug 27;95(9):407-9
Date
Aug-27-1966
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - therapy
Canada
Hospitalization
Humans
Voluntary Health Agencies
Abstract
Alcoholism is an illness that constitutes a major health problem at all levels of society. The physician should accept his responsibility to prevent it and to care for the alcoholic. If he knows that one of his patients is drinking immoderately, he should warn him of the outlook. A patient's acquired dependence on alcohol may be overt, or revealed only on examination for organic disease or emotional disturbance. The diagnosis may be accepted reluctantly, or denied despite positive evidence, but the patient should be persuaded to give up drinking. He may require psychiatric help or advice from a social worker. He may be so ill as to require treatment in hospital, and hospitals must recognize the urgency of such admissions. Discharge from hospital does not end treatment, for alcoholism is a chronic disease, requiring long-term planning, persistent follow-up and enduring sympathy by the physician, who must always be as available to his alcoholic patient as he is to his patient with diabetes, epilepsy or cardiac disease.
PubMed ID
5923654 View in PubMed
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Multiple isolates and characteristics of human T-cell leukemia virus type II.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224098
Source
J Virol. 1992 Apr;66(4):2456-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1992
Author
W W Hall
H. Takahashi
C. Liu
M H Kaplan
O. Scheewind
S. Ijichi
K. Nagashima
R C Gallo
Author Affiliation
Division of Infectious Diseases, North Shore University Hospital-Cornell University Medical College, Manhasset, New York 11030.
Source
J Virol. 1992 Apr;66(4):2456-63
Date
Apr-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amino Acid Sequence
Base Sequence
Blotting, Southern
Cell Line
DNA, Viral
Deltaretrovirus Infections - microbiology
Female
Gene Products, env - chemistry - genetics
HIV Infections - microbiology
Human T-lymphotropic virus 2 - genetics - isolation & purification - ultrastructure
Humans
Male
Microscopy, Electron
Middle Aged
Molecular Sequence Data
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Proviruses - genetics
Restriction Mapping
Retroviridae Proteins, Oncogenic - chemistry - genetics
env Gene Products, Human Immunodeficiency Virus
Abstract
Human T-cell leukemia (or lymphotropic) virus type II (HTLV-II) was isolated from eight HTLV-seropositive patients, six of whom were also infected with human immunodeficiency virus, by cocultivation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with BJAB, a continuous B-cell line. Restriction endonuclease mapping of the proviruses demonstrated consistent differences among isolates, and two distinct physical map patterns were observed. The results suggest the existence of two closely related molecular subtypes of HTLV-II, which are tentatively designated HTLV-IIa and HTLV-IIb. This finding was supported by preliminary nucleotide sequence analysis of the env gene region encoding the transmembrane glycoprotein gp21, which showed consistent differences between the two proposed virus subtypes. Exploitation of differences in restriction endonuclease sites allowed polymerase chain reaction amplification to detect and differentiate the two subtypes in fresh PBMCs of HTLV-seropositive intravenous drug abusers (IVDAs). The results of these studies confirm that HTLV-II infection is the prominent HTLV infection in seropositive IVDAs and also show that infection with both subtypes occurs. The finding of genetic heterogeneity in the HTLV-II group of viruses may have important implications for studies on its role in human disease and will be useful in characterizing the viruses present in newly discovered endemic foci in New World indigenous populations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
1347796 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.