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Early career choice: an unsuccessful program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241582
Source
J Med Educ. 1983 Sep;58(9):695-702
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1983
Author
W D Dauphinee
V L Patel
Source
J Med Educ. 1983 Sep;58(9):695-702
Date
Sep-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Attitude of Health Personnel
Career Choice
Clinical Clerkship
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Educational Measurement
Humans
Medicine
Quebec
Questionnaires
Specialization
Students, Medical - psychology
Time Factors
Abstract
During the 1960s, early educational specialization and increasingly elective curricula were promoted as instructional advances. More recently, early educational specialization has been suggested as a solution to high educational costs and knowledge overload. In 1973 the McGill University Faculty of Medicine introduced a program of early specialization ("streaming") in the senior clerkship. The streams were: medicine, surgery, psychiatry, and family medicine. The streams emphasized their own clinical areas but not to the exclusion of other subjects. After three years, streaming was disbanded as students chose the medicine stream with increasing frequency. Streaming may have contributed to poorer class performance on licensing examinations. Responses of the students to questionnaires revealed that streaming did not lead to an early career choice and that the students did not use electives to fill in perceived gaps. The students often chose streams independent of career plans. Thus, it was concluded that early specialization did not hold promise as a solution to the issues of educational costs or knowledge overload.
PubMed ID
6887213 View in PubMed
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Methylmercury and the health of autochthons in northwest Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233221
Source
Clin Invest Med. 1988 Apr;11(2):71-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1988
Author
W O Spitzer
D W Baxter
H S Barrows
D C Thomas
R. Tamblyn
C M Wolfson
H B Dinsdale
W D Dauphinee
D P Anderson
R S Roberts
Author Affiliation
Montreal General Hospital Research Institute, McGill University, Quebec.
Source
Clin Invest Med. 1988 Apr;11(2):71-98
Date
Apr-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Environmental Exposure
Epidemiologic Methods
Fishes
Hair - analysis
Humans
Indians, North American
Methylmercury Compounds - adverse effects - pharmacokinetics
Quebec
Risk factors
Water Pollutants - adverse effects
Water Pollutants, Chemical - adverse effects
Abstract
We conducted a cross-sectional epidemiologic and clinical study to evaluate the nature, magnitude, and frequency of unfavourable health states among residents of northwest Quebec. Of particular interest were the possible occurrence of Minamata disease and any other neurological abnormalities. We also sought to determine whether industrial or naturally-occurring mercury in the region's environment were causally associated with any disorders that might be detected. A total of 321 subjects were studied in four groups with contrasting exposure to point-source mercury from a chlor-alkali plant in the area. Methylmercury in hair served as the marker of subject's ingestion of any organic mercury (natural or industrial). Ten pre-chosen target variables, seven clinical and three neurophysiological, were assessed in all subjects. Relationships between mercury in hair and each target variable were calculated. We determined whether gradients in target variables corresponded to gradients in potential exposure of the subjects to the aquatic emissions of the chlor-alkali plant. Minamata disease was not found. Diabetes and alcohol-related health problems assessed as important clinically plausible confounders, were common. Differences in frequency or magnitude of clinical, toxicological, and physiological findings among the contrast groups were small and not of clinical or statistical significance. There were definite relationships between mercury in hair and four target variables despite the low values of mercury measured and the mild nature of the health problems observed. This would suggest that verifiable biological threshold levels for clinical effects, if such exist, may be substantially lower among Canadians than those currently adopted as policy for adults elsewhere. A gradient was found only for two of the ten target variables. Clinically meaningful alternate hypotheses for observed health effects emerge in the data and agree with observations in the field made by consulting clinical experts.
PubMed ID
3396257 View in PubMed
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Questionable prescribing for elderly patients in Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218022
Source
CMAJ. 1994 Jun 1;150(11):1801-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1994
Author
R M Tamblyn
P J McLeod
M. Abrahamowicz
J. Monette
D C Gayton
L. Berkson
W D Dauphinee
R M Grad
A R Huang
L M Isaac
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Que.
Source
CMAJ. 1994 Jun 1;150(11):1801-9
Date
Jun-1-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Cardiovascular Agents - therapeutic use
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Therapy, Combination
Drug Utilization Review
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Male
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Quebec
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
To estimate the prevalence of questionable and rational high-risk prescribing among elderly people of the three drug groups most commonly implicated in drug-related illness: cardiovascular drugs, psychotropic drugs and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).
Retrospective prevalence study; all prescription and billing records for the period Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1990, for the study sample were retrieved from the relevant provincial databases of the Régie de l'assurance-maladie du Québec.
Quebec.
Regionally stratified random sample of 63,268 elderly medicare registrants who made at least one visit to physician in 1990 and were not living in a health care institution for the entire year.
Prescription information was examined for three types of high-risk prescribing: rational and questionable drug combinations, excessive treatment duration and drugs relatively contraindicated for use in elderly people.
Overall, 52.6% of the patients experienced one or more events of high-risk prescribing, and 45.6% experienced at least one that was questionable. High-risk prescribing was most prevalent for psychotropic drugs, and questionable prescribing was more frequent than rational prescribing in this drug group. An estimated 30.8% of the total elderly population in Quebec received benzodiazepines for more than 30 consecutive days, 12.9% received a long-acting benzodiazepine, and 13.0% received a questionable high-risk psychotropic drug combination. The prevalence of high-risk prescribing was higher among the women than among the men and increased with age until 75 to 84 years. There were significant unexplained differences between regions in the regional prevalence of high-risk prescribing, particularly of psychotropic drugs.
The prevalence of questionable high-risk prescribing, especially of psychotropic drugs, is substantial among elderly people. This may be a potentially important and avoidable risk factor for drug-related illness in elderly people.
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 1994 Dec 1;151(11):1555-67954148
Comment In: CMAJ. 1994 Nov 1;151(9):12367954165
PubMed ID
8199957 View in PubMed
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Tests of sequential testing in two years' results of Part 2 of the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207446
Source
Acad Med. 1997 Oct;72(10 Suppl 1):S22-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997
Author
A I Rothman
D E Blackmore
W D Dauphinée
R. Reznick
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto Department of Medicine, ON, Canada. arthur.rothman@utoronto.ca
Source
Acad Med. 1997 Oct;72(10 Suppl 1):S22-4
Date
Oct-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence - standards
Humans
Licensure, Medical
Ontario
Reproducibility of Results
PubMed ID
9347728 View in PubMed
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