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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Cross-national invariance of dimensions of parental rearing behaviour: comparison of psychometric data of Swedish depressives and healthy subjects with Dutch target ratings on the EMBU.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46737
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 1986 Mar;148:305-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1986
Author
W A Arrindell
C. Perris
H. Perris
M. Eisemann
J. van der Ende
L. von Knorring
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 1986 Mar;148:305-9
Date
Mar-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Child Rearing
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Depressive Disorder - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - psychology
Psychometrics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
A psychometric study on Swedish and Dutch samples used the EMBU, a self-report instrument designed to assess memories of parents' rearing behaviour. Of the four primary factors identified previously with Dutch individuals (Rejection, Emotional Warmth, Over-protection, and Favouring Subject), the first three were retrieved in a similar form in the two Swedish groups (depressives and healthy, non-patients). Examination of the metric equivalence of the scales and the strength of the factors for each group indicated that comparisons of patterns and levels between groups from the respective countries on the three factors showing cross-national constancy would be warranted. Scale-level factor analyses of these dimensions produced identical two-factor compositions (CARE and PROTECTION) across national groups which further supported this conclusion.
PubMed ID
3719223 View in PubMed
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Disgust sensitivity and the sex difference in fears to common indigenous animals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202814
Source
Behav Res Ther. 1999 Mar;37(3):273-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
W A Arrindell
S. Mulkens
J. Kok
J. Vollenbroek
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Psychology, Academic Hospital, University of Groningen, The Netherlands. w.arrindell@ppsw.rug.nl
Source
Behav Res Ther. 1999 Mar;37(3):273-80
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animal Population Groups
Animals
Arousal
Fear
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality
Abstract
Davey's mediational hypothesis [Davey, G. C. L. (1994). Self-reported fears to common indigenous animals in an adult UK population: the role of disgust sensitivity. British Journal of Psychology, 85, 541-554.] suggests that the sex difference in self-assessed animal fears can be accounted for by the sex difference in disgust sensitivity. An empirical test failed to support this hypothesis in a non-clinical sample (N = 214). Holding constant the influences of confounders such as age, fear of contamination, sex roles, neuroticism, psychoticism and disgust sensitivity, biological sex kept emerging as a significant predictor in relation to four types of animal fears (fear-relevant animals, dry or non-slimy invertebrates, slimy or wet looking animals and farm animals). Other things being equal, high disgust sensitivity either lost its predictive capability (in relation to dry or non-slimy invertebrates and slimy or wet looking animals) or predicted high fear of fear-relevant animals and of farm animals inequivalently across, respectively, the sexes (high in females only) and age groups (high in the old only). A multifactorial, interactionist approach should be advocated in the study of the aetiology of animal fears if progress in this area is to be achieved.
PubMed ID
10087645 View in PubMed
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Masculinity-femininity as a national characteristic and its relationship with national agoraphobic fear levels: Fodor's sex role hypothesis revitalized.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52137
Source
Behav Res Ther. 2003 Jul;41(7):795-807
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
W A Arrindell
Martin Eisemann
Jörg Richter
Tian P S Oei
Vicente E Caballo
Jan van der Ende
Ezio Sanavio
Nuri Bagés
Lya Feldman
Bárbara Torres
Claudio Sica
Saburo Iwawaki
Chryse Hatzichristou
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Groningen, Heymans Institute, Grote Kruisstraat 2/I, 9712 TS, Groningen, The Netherlands. w.arrindell@ppsw.rug.nl
Source
Behav Res Ther. 2003 Jul;41(7):795-807
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Agoraphobia - ethnology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Ethnic Groups - psychology
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Male
Middle Aged
Panic Disorder - ethnology - psychology
Phobic Disorders - epidemiology - ethnology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Hofstede's dimension of national culture termed Masculinity-Femininity [. Cultures and organizations: software of the mind. London: McGraw-Hill] is proposed to be of relevance for understanding national-level differences in self-assessed agoraphobic fears. This prediction is based on the classical work of Fodor [. In: V. Franks & V. Burtle (Eds.), Women in therapy: new psychotherapies for a changing society. New York: Brunner/Mazel]. A unique data set comprising 11 countries (total N=5491 students) provided the opportunity of scrutinizing this issue. It was hypothesized and found that national Masculinity (the degree to which cultures delineate sex roles, with masculine or tough societies making clearer differentiations between the sexes than feminine or modest societies do) would correlate positively with national agoraphobic fear levels (as assessed with the Fear Survey Schedule-III). Following the correction for sex and age differences across national samples, a significant and large effect-sized national-level (ecological) r=+0.67 (P=0.01) was found. A highly feminine society such as Sweden had the lowest, whereas the champion among the masculine societies, Japan, had the highest national Agoraphobic fear score.
PubMed ID
12781246 View in PubMed
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Phobic dimensions--II. Cross-national confirmation of the multidimensional structure underlying the Mobility Inventory (MI).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214807
Source
Behav Res Ther. 1995 Jul;33(6):711-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
W A Arrindell
B J Cox
J. van der Ende
M G Kwee
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Groningen, Academic Hospital, The Netherlands.
Source
Behav Res Ther. 1995 Jul;33(6):711-24
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agoraphobia - diagnosis - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Panic Disorder - diagnosis - psychology
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Phobic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Social Environment
Abstract
In a previous study (Cox, Swinson, Kuch & Reichman, Behaviour Research and Therapy, 31, 427-431, 1993), factor analyses of the responses of 177 Canadian panic disorder with agoraphobia patients to the 'When Accompanied' and 'When Alone' scales of the Mobility Inventory (Chambless, Caputo, Jasin, Gracely & Williams, Behaviour Research and Therapy, 23, 35-44, 1985) revealed three factors in each case: Fears of (1) Public places; (2) Enclosed spaces; and (3) Open spaces. Using two distinct methods of factorial analysis, evidence was found for the cross-national generalizability of the factor model when the responses of Dutch members of a society for individuals suffering from an anxiety disorder (N = 213) were contrasted with the original Canadian findings. Inventory items were distributed in a non-overlapping fashion across the corresponding three subscales. Psychometric properties of the subscales were encouraging, although some difficulties emerged when attempts were made at distinguishing Fears of Enclosed spaces from Fears of Open spaces. This was because of their correlational configurations with other measures. Scores on all scales varied with socioeconomic status (SES); Ss in lower SES groups had significantly higher agoraphobic avoidance scores than their equivalents in higher SES groups. Results of higher-order analysis, which included several state and trait measures of psychological functioning in addition to the Mobility Inventory, revealed two orthogonal, second-order factors which were interpreted as Agoraphobia and Neuroticism/Negative Affect vs Positive Affect. Implications for further studies are briefly outlined.
PubMed ID
7654165 View in PubMed
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Phobic dimensions: IV. The structure of animal fears.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198558
Source
Behav Res Ther. 2000 May;38(5):509-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
W A Arrindell
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Groningen, The Netherlands. w.arrindell@ppsw.rug.nl
Source
Behav Res Ther. 2000 May;38(5):509-30
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animal Population Groups
Animals
Gender Identity
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Phobic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Research designed to determine the number and kind of dimensions underlying self-reports of animal fears is relatively rare. To contribute further knowledge to this area of study, Davey's methodology [Davey, G. C. L. (1994a). Self-reported fears to common indigenous animals in an adult UK population: the role of disgust sensitivity. British Journal of Psychology, 85, 541-554.] was improved. Principal components analysis with Varimax rotation of the self-ratings to items of Davey's Animal Fears Questionnaire returned by Ss from a Dutch community sample (N = 214) revealed four reliable, relatively independent dimensions: (1) fear-relevant animals, (2) dry or non-slimy invertebrates, (3) slimy or wet looking animals and (4) farm animals. Replicating Davey (1994a), females, relative to males, reported higher levels on most fear items. Principal components analysis with Oblimin rotation involving animal fears scales (derived from the dimensions identified in the present study), dimensions of non-animal fears, disgust sensitivity, sex-role orientation and the major dimensions of personality from the Eysenckian system revealed 4 higher-order factors, namely specific animals fears, positive affectivity, toughmindedness and negative affectivity. At an even higher level, these 4 higher-order factors merged into two factors: (1) a bipolar positive affectivity versus neuroticism/general emotionality/negative affectivity factor and (2) a toughmindedness dimension. Studies such as these contribute in helping provide the elements of the hierarchical model of fears proposed by Taylor [Taylor, S. (1998). The hierarchic structure of fears. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 36, 205-214.]. Findings across different studies suggest that there are at least 5 first-order dimensions of animal fears, the above 4 and predatory (fierce) animals, that may be included in such a model.
PubMed ID
10816909 View in PubMed
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The short-EMBU in East-Germany and Sweden: a cross-national factorial validity extension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194911
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2001 Apr;42(2):157-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
W A Arrindell
J. Richter
M. Eisemann
T. Gärling
O. Rydén
S B Hansson
E. Kasielke
W. Frindte
R. Gillholm
M. Gustafsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Groningen, The Netherlands. w.arrindell@ppsw.rug.nl
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2001 Apr;42(2):157-60
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Germany, East
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Psychological Tests
Reproducibility of Results
Social Perception
Sweden
Abstract
The factorial stability and reliability of the 23-item s(hort)-EMBU previously demonstrated to be satisfactory in samples of students from Greece, Guatemala, Hungary and Italy, were extended with 791 students from East-Germany and Sweden. Previous findings on factorial validity, internal reliability and correlations among scales were replicated. The 23-item form thus continues to be recommended as a reliable functional equivalent to the early 81-item EMBU, when the clinical and/or research context does not adequately permit application of time-consuming test batteries.
PubMed ID
11321639 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.