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1 Canadian Field Hospital in Haiti: surgical experience in earthquake relief.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122035
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Max Talbot
Bethann Meunier
Vincent Trottier
Michael Christian
Tracey Hillier
Chris Berger
Vivian McAlister
Scott Taylor
Author Affiliation
1 Canadian Field Hospital, Canadian Forces, Montreal, QC. max_talbot@hotmail.com
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Earthquakes
Female
Haiti
Hospitals, Packaged - organization & administration
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Multiple Trauma - etiology - surgery
Operating Rooms
Relief Work - organization & administration
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The Canadian Forces' (CF) deployable hospital, 1 Canadian Field Hospital, was deployed to Haiti after an earthquake that caused massive devastation. Two surgical teams performed 167 operations over a 39-day period starting 17 days after the index event. Most operations were unrelated to the earthquake. Replacing or supplementing the destroyed local surgical capacity for a brief period after a disaster can be a valuable contribution to relief efforts. For future humanitarian operations/disaster response missions, the CF will study the feasibility of accelerating the deployment of surgical capabilities.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22854149 View in PubMed
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Admission base deficit and lactate levels in Canadian patients with blunt trauma: are they useful markers of mortality?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123467
Source
J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2012 Jun;72(6):1532-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Jean-Francois Ouellet
Derek J Roberts
Corina Tiruta
Andrew W Kirkpatrick
Michelle Mercado
Vincent Trottier
Elijah Dixon
David V Feliciano
Chad G Ball
Author Affiliation
Regional Trauma Services, Department of Surgery University of Calgary, Foothills Medical Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2012 Jun;72(6):1532-5
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acid-Base Imbalance - blood - mortality
Adult
Aged
Alberta
Analysis of Variance
Biological Markers - analysis
Blood Gas Analysis
Cohort Studies
Diagnostic Tests, Routine - methods
Female
Hospital Mortality - trends
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Lactic Acid - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Statistics, nonparametric
Survival Analysis
Trauma Centers
Wounds, Nonpenetrating - blood - diagnosis - mortality
Abstract
Elevated base deficit (BD) and lactate levels at admission in patients with injury have been shown to be associated with increased mortality. This relationship is undefined in the Canadian experience. The goal of this study was to define the association between arterial blood gas (ABG) values at admission and mortality for Canadians with severe blunt injury.
A retrospective review of 3,000 consecutive adult major trauma admissions (Injury Severity Score, = 12) to a Canadian academic tertiary care referral center was performed. ABG values at the time of arrival were analyzed with respect to associated mortality and length of stay.
A total of 2,269 patients (76%) had complete data available for analysis. After exclusion of patients who sustained a penetrating injury or were admitted for minor falls (ground levels or low height), 445 had an ABG drawn within 2 hours of arrival. Patients who died displayed a higher median lactate (3.6 vs. 2.2, p
PubMed ID
22695417 View in PubMed
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Causes of death in Canadian Forces members deployed to Afghanistan and implications on tactical combat casualty care provision.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129125
Source
J Trauma. 2011 Nov;71(5 Suppl 1):S401-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Dylan Pannell
Ronald Brisebois
Max Talbot
Vincent Trottier
Julien Clement
Naisan Garraway
Vivian McAlister
Homer C Tien
Author Affiliation
2 Field Ambulance, Canadian Forces Base Petawawa, Petawawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Trauma. 2011 Nov;71(5 Suppl 1):S401-7
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Afghan Campaign 2001-
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Delivery of Health Care - methods
Female
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Male
Military Medicine - organization & administration
Military Personnel
Retrospective Studies
Wounds and Injuries - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Abstract
As part of its contribution to the Global War on Terror and North Atlantic Treaty Organization's International Security Assistance Force, the Canadian Forces deployed to Kandahar, Afghanistan, in 2006. We have studied the causes of deaths sustained by the Canadian Forces during the first 28 months of this mission. The purpose of this study was to identify potential areas for improving battlefield trauma care.
We analyzed autopsy reports of Canadian soldiers killed in Afghanistan between January 2006 and April 2008. Demographic characteristics, injury data, location of death within the chain of evacuation, and cause of death were determined. We also determined whether the death was potentially preventable using both explicit review and implicit review by a panel of trauma surgeons.
During the study period, 73 Canadian Forces members died in Afghanistan. Their mean age was 29 (+/-7) years and 98% were male. The predominant mechanism of injury was explosive blast, resulting in 81% of overall deaths during the study period. Gunshot wounds and nonblast-related motor vehicle collisions were the second and third leading mechanisms of injury causing death. The mean Injury Severity Score was 57 (+/-24) for the 63 study patients analyzed. The most common cause of death was hemorrhage (38%), followed by neurologic injury (33%) and blast injuries (16%). Three deaths were deemed potentially preventable on explicit review, but implicit review only categorized two deaths as being potentially preventable.
The majority of combat-related deaths occurred in the field (92%). Very few deaths were potentially preventable with current Tactical Combat Casualty interventions. Our panel review identified several interventions that are not currently part of Tactical Combat Casualty that may prevent future battlefield deaths.
PubMed ID
22071995 View in PubMed
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Interest and applicability of acute care surgery among surgeons in Quebec: a provincial survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108483
Source
Can J Surg. 2013 Aug;56(4):E63-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Émilie Joos
Vincent Trottier
Daniel Thauvette
Author Affiliation
Department of General Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Affilié Universitaire de Québec, Québec, Que. emilie.joos.1@ulaval.ca
Source
Can J Surg. 2013 Aug;56(4):E63-7
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers
Attitude of Health Personnel
Emergencies
Humans
Quebec
Questionnaires
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Trauma Centers
Workload - statistics & numerical data
Wounds and Injuries - surgery
Abstract
Acute care surgery (ACS) comprises trauma and emergency surgery. The purpose of this new specialty is to involve trauma and nontrauma surgeons in the care of acutely ill patients with a surgical pathology. In Quebec, few acute care surgery services (ACSS) exist, and the concept is still poorly understood by most general surgeons. This survey was meant to determine the opinions and interest of Quebec general surgeons in this new model.
We created a bilingual electronic survey using a Web interface and sent it by email to all surgeons registered with the Association qu?b?coise de chirurgie. A reminder was sent 2 weeks later to boost response rates.
The response rate was 36.9%. Most respondents had academic practices, and 16% worked in level 1 trauma centres. Most respondents had a high operative case load, and 66% performed at least 10 urgent general surgical cases per month. Although most (88%) thought that ACS was an interesting field, only 45% were interested in participating in an ACSS. Respondents who deemed this concept least applicable to their practices were more likely to be working in nonacademic centres.
Despite a strong interest in emergency general surgery, few surgeons were interested in participating in an ACSS. This finding may be explained by lack of comprehension of this new model and by comfort with traditional practice. We aim to change this paradigm by demonstrating the feasibility and benefits of the new ACSS at our centre in a follow-up study.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23883506 View in PubMed
Less detail