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Climate-sensitive health priorities in Nunatsiavut, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264176
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15(1):605
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sherilee L Harper
Victoria L Edge
James Ford
Ashlee Cunsolo Willox
Michele Wood
Scott A McEwen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15(1):605
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
This exploratory study used participatory methods to identify, characterize, and rank climate-sensitive health priorities in Nunatsiavut, Labrador, Canada.
A mixed method study design was used and involved collecting both qualitative and quantitative data at regional, community, and individual levels. In-depth interviews with regional health representatives were conducted throughout Nunatsiavut (n?=?11). In addition, three PhotoVoice workshops were held with Rigolet community members (n?=?11), where participants took photos of areas, items, or concepts that expressed how climate change is impacting their health. The workshop groups shared their photographs, discussed the stories and messages behind them, and then grouped photos into re-occurring themes. Two community surveys were administered in Rigolet to capture data on observed climatic and environmental changes in the area, and perceived impacts on health, wellbeing, and lifestyles (n?=?187).
Climate-sensitive health pathways were described in terms of inter-relationships between environmental and social determinants of Inuit health. The climate-sensitive health priorities for the region included food security, water security, mental health and wellbeing, new hazards and safety concerns, and health services and delivery.
The results highlight several climate-sensitive health priorities that are specific to the Nunatsiavut region, and suggest approaching health research and adaptation planning from an EcoHealth perspective.
PubMed ID
26135309 View in PubMed
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Community-derived research dissemination strategies in an Inuit community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130155
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):532-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Erica L Pufall
Andria Q Jones
S A McEwen
Charlene Lyall
Andrew S Peregrine
Victoria L Edge
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Medicine, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada. epufall@uoguelph.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):532-41
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods
Female
Focus Groups
Health Education - methods
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Interviews as Topic - methods
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Qualitative Research
Abstract
To determine how residents of the Inuit community of Nain, Nunatsiavut, Canada would like research results disseminated to their community.
Qualitative study using focus groups and key informant interviews.
As part of a larger study on food safety, one focus group was conducted with hunters (n=7) and a second with members of the general community (n=7) to determine research dissemination strategies previously used in the community, and to obtain recommendations for effective and appropriate strategies for future use. One-on-one key informant interviews were also conducted with Nain community members (n=5) selected for their insights on the study themes. Informants included a teacher, a nurse, a community elder, and one official from each of the Nain and Nunatsiavut governments. Data from focus groups and key informant interviews were combined and analysed using thematic analysis.
Open houses were identified as the preferred method to present research results to the community. Presentation methods should be interactive, visual and presented in both English and Inuktitut. Research dissemination efforts should be timely and involve both the researcher and a local official or community member to give the results additional validity and relevance. If possible, involving youth in the presentations will increase the impact of the message.
Preferred information dissemination techniques in this Inuit community echo successful techniques from research conducted in Aboriginal communities. Future knowledge translation efforts in Inuit communities should consider involving youth in presentations due to their influential nature within the community.
PubMed ID
22030010 View in PubMed
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Community-level risk factors for notifiable gastrointestinal illness in the Northwest Territories, Canada, 1991-2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117028
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:63
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Aliya Pardhan-Ali
Jeff Wilson
Victoria L Edge
Chris Furgal
Richard Reid-Smith
Maria Santos
Scott A McEwen
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada. apardhan@uoguelph.ca
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:63
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Binomial Distribution
Campylobacter Infections - epidemiology
Cultural Characteristics
Food Habits
Giardiasis - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Registries
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Salmonella Infections - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Enteric pathogens are an important cause of illness, however, little is known about their community-level risk factors (e.g., socioeconomic, cultural and physical environmental conditions) in the Northwest Territories (NWT) of Canada. The objective of this study was to undertake ecological (group-level) analyses by combining two existing data sources to examine potential community-level risk factors for campylobacteriosis, giardiasis and salmonellosis, which are three notifiable (mandatory reporting to public health authorities at the time of diagnosis) enteric infections.
The rate of campylobacteriosis was modeled using a Poisson distribution while rates of giardiasis and salmonellosis were modeled using a Negative Binomial distribution. Rate ratios (the ratio of the incidence of disease in the exposed group to the incidence of disease in the non-exposed group) were estimated for infections by the three major pathogens with potential community-level risk factors.
Significant (p=0.05) associations varied by etiology. There was increased risk of infection with Salmonella for communities with higher proportions of 'households in core need' (unsuitable, inadequate, and/or unaffordable housing) up to 42% after which the rate started to decrease with increasing core need. The risk of giardiasis was significantly higher both with increased 'internal mobility' (population moving between communities), and also where the community's primary health facility was a health center rather than a full-service hospital. Communities with higher health expenditures had a significantly decreased risk of giardiasis. Results of modeling that focused on each of Giardia and Salmonella infections separately supported and expanded upon previous research outcomes that suggested health disparities are often associated with socioeconomic status, geographical and social mobility, as well as access to health care (e.g. facilities, services and professionals). In the campylobacteriosis model, a negative association was found between food prices in communities and risk of infection. There was also a significant interaction between trapping and consumption of traditional foods in communities. Higher rates of community participation in both activities appeared to have a protective effect against campylobacteriosis.
These results raise very interesting questions about the role that traditional activities might play in infectious enteric disease incidence in the NWT, but should be interpreted with caution, recognizing database limitations in collection of case data and risk factor information (e.g. missing data). Given the cultural, socioeconomic, and nutritional benefits associated with traditional food practices, targeted community-based collaborative research is necessary to more fully investigate the statistical correlations identified in this exploratory research. This study demonstrates the value of examining the role of social determinants in the transmission and risk of infectious diseases.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23339723 View in PubMed
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Estimating the under-reporting rate for infectious gastrointestinal illness in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174646
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 May-Jun;96(3):178-81
Publication Type
Article
Author
Shannon E Majowicz
Victoria L Edge
Aamir Fazil
W Bruce McNab
Kathryn A Doré
Paul N Sockett
James A Flint
Dean Middleton
Scott A McEwen
Jeffery B Wilson
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada. shannon_majowicz@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 May-Jun;96(3):178-81
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disease Notification - standards
Feces - microbiology
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - microbiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Linear Models
Ontario - epidemiology
Public Health Practice
Sentinel Surveillance
Abstract
In Ontario, infectious gastrointestinal illness (IGI) reporting can be represented by a linear model of several sequential steps required for a case to be captured in the provincial reportable disease surveillance system. Since reportable enteric data are known to represent only a small fraction of the total IGI in the community, the objective of this study was to estimate the under-reporting rate for IGI in Ontario.
A distribution of plausible values for the under-reporting rate was estimated by specifying input distributions for the proportions reported at each step in the reporting chain, and multiplying these distributions together using simulation methods. Input distributions (type of distribution and parameters) for the proportion of cases reported at each step of the reporting chain were determined using data from the Public Health Agency of Canada's National Studies on Acute Gastrointestinal Illness (NSAGI) initiative.
For each case of enteric illness reported to the province of Ontario, the estimated number of cases of IGI in the community ranged from 105 to 1,389, with a median of 285, and a mean and standard deviation of 313 and 128, respectively.
Each case of enteric illness reported to the province of Ontario represents an estimated several hundred cases of IGI in the community. Thus, reportable disease data should be used with caution when estimating the burden of such illness. Program planners and public health personnel may want to consider this fact when developing population-based interventions.
PubMed ID
15913079 View in PubMed
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Factors associated with the use of over-the-counter medications in cases of acute gastroenteritis in Hamilton, Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165803
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Nov-Dec;97(6):489-93
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gillian O Frosst
Shannon E Majowicz
Victoria L Edge
Author Affiliation
Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Nov-Dec;97(6):489-93
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antidiarrheals - therapeutic use
Antiemetics - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Diarrhea - drug therapy - etiology
Female
Fluid Therapy - utilization
Gastroenteritis - complications - drug therapy
Health Care Surveys
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Nonprescription Drugs - therapeutic use
Ontario - epidemiology
Pharmacies - utilization
Retrospective Studies
Self Medication - utilization
Vomiting - drug therapy - etiology
Abstract
Monitoring over-the-counter (OTC) medication sales may provide an accurate, reliable way to observe trends and detect aberrations in community health status. This study assessed demographic and symptomatic factors associated with the use of OTC anti-nauseants (AN), anti-diarrheals (AD), and rehydration therapies (RT) in cases of acute gastroenteritis (GE).
Data on 351 cases of self-reported, acute GE obtained from a population-based telephone survey were analyzed. The four outcomes of interest were use of an OTC 1) AD, 2) AN, 3) RT, and 4) use of at least one of the three. The association between each factor of interest and the use of OTC treatments was assessed.
Of the 351 cases, 110 (31%) used at least one OTC AD, AN, or RT for their illness. The most significantly associated factor was primary symptom group: cases with both vomiting and diarrhea were 3.6 times more likely to use at least one of the three OTC medications than cases with either vomiting or diarrhea only. Other factors associated with the use of at least one OTC were being female (OR=1.97), being 10-14 years of age iOR=l 1.22), and use of antacids in the 28 days prior to illness (OR=2.31).
This study provides the first published assessment of factors associated with the use of OTC medications by community cases of GE. Those who use OTC medications for their illness appear to differ from those who do not. This information can inform health officials, and aid development of pharmacy-based syndromic surveillance.
PubMed ID
17203735 View in PubMed
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Food insecurity and food consumption by season in households with children in an Arctic city: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283392
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 Jun 15;17(1):578
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2017
Author
Catherine Huet
James D Ford
Victoria L Edge
Jamal Shirley
Nia King
Sherilee L Harper
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 Jun 15;17(1):578
Date
Jun-15-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
High rates of food insecurity are documented among Inuit households in Canada; however, data on food insecurity prevalence and seasonality for Inuit households with children are lacking, especially in city centres. This project: (1) compared food consumption patterns for households with and without children, (2) compared the prevalence of food insecurity for households with and without children, (3) compared food consumption patterns and food insecurity prevalence between seasons, and (4) identified factors associated with food insecurity in households with children in Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada.
Randomly selected households were surveyed in Iqaluit in September 2012 and May 2013. Household food security status was determined using an adapted United States Department of Agriculture Household Food Security Survey Module. Univariable logistic regressions were used to examine unconditional associations between food security status and demographics, socioeconomics, frequency of food consumption, and method of food preparation in households with children by season.
Households with children (n = 431) and without children (n = 468) participated in the survey. Food insecurity was identified in 32.9% (95% CI: 28.5-37.4%) of households with children; this was significantly higher than in households without children (23.2%, 95% CI: 19.4-27.1%). The prevalence of household food insecurity did not significantly differ by season. Demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of the person responsible for food preparation, including low formal education attainment (ORSept = 4.3, 95% CI: 2.3-8.0; ORMay = 3.2, 95% CI: 1.8-5.8), unemployment (ORSept = 1.1, 95% CI: 1.1-1.3; ORMay = 1.3, 95% CI: 1.1-1.5), and Inuit identity (ORSept = 8.9, 95% CI: 3.4-23.5; ORMay = 21.8, 95% CI: 6.6-72.4), were associated with increased odds of food insecurity in households with children. Fruit and vegetable consumption (ORSept = 0.4, 95% CI: 0.2-0.8; ORMay = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.2-0.9), as well as eating cooked (ORSept = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-1.0; ORMay = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.9) and raw (ORSept = 1.7, 95% CI: 0.9-3.0; ORMay = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.0-3.1) fish were associated with decreased odds of food insecurity among households with children, while eating frozen meat and/or fish (ORSept = 2.6, 95% CI: 1.4-5.0; ORMay = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.1-3.7) was associated with increased odds of food insecurity.
Food insecurity is high among households with children in Iqaluit. Despite the partial subsistence livelihoods of many Inuit in the city, we found no seasonal differences in food security and food consumption for households with children. Interventions aiming to decrease food insecurity in these households should consider food consumption habits, and the reported demographic and socioeconomic determinants of food insecurity.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28619039 View in PubMed
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From stool to statistics: reporting of acute gastrointestinal illnesses in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178440
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 Jul-Aug;95(4):309-13
Publication Type
Article
Author
James A Flint
Kathryn Doré
Shannon E Majowicz
Victoria L Edge
Paul Sockett
Author Affiliation
Foodborne, Waterborne and Zoonotic Infections Division, Centre for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Population and Public Health Branch, Health Canada. flintjam@carec.paho.org
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 Jul-Aug;95(4):309-13
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Canada - epidemiology
Disease Notification - statistics & numerical data
Disease Outbreaks
Enterobacteriaceae - isolation & purification
Enterobacteriaceae Infections - epidemiology
Feces - microbiology
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Laboratories - standards
Public Health Informatics
Sentinel Surveillance
Abstract
Limitations associated with the under-reporting of enteric illnesses have long been recognized but the extent and variation of this under-reporting in Canada has not been examined. Given the public health value of surveillance data, a closer examination of under-reporting of enteric illnesses in Canada was warranted.
Paper-based surveys were administered (a) to all laboratories in Canada licensed to process stool specimens and (b) to all local public health authorities in two provinces.
Of the laboratories surveyed, 67% (n=274) conducted on-site testing of stool specimens for enteric bacteria, 31% (n=126) for parasites and 10% (n=42) for viruses. In the year 2000, these laboratories processed 459,982 stool specimens, of which 5%, 15%, 8% and 19% were positive for enteric bacteria (excluding C. difficile), C. difficile, parasites and viruses, respectively. Variations in laboratory testing and health authority reporting protocols and policies were identified. Of the laboratory-confirmed cases of AGI reported to local public health authorities, 5% (n=846) were not reported to provincial counterparts.
A significant proportion of AGI cases submitting stool specimens are not captured in Canada's passive surveillance system due to unknown etiology. A much smaller proportion of laboratory-confirmed cases reported to local public health authorities are not captured at the provincial or national level. Given that the number of laboratory-confirmed AGI cases represents such a small fraction of all community cases, strategies to compensate for under-reporting and efforts directed at harmonizing laboratory and local public health authority policies and practices would be welcomed.
PubMed ID
15362478 View in PubMed
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"From this place and of this place:" climate change, sense of place, and health in Nunatsiavut, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124293
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2012 Aug;75(3):538-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Ashlee Cunsolo Willox
Sherilee L Harper
James D Ford
Karen Landman
Karen Houle
Victoria L Edge
Author Affiliation
School of Environmental Design & Rural Development, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1. ashlee@uoguelph.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2012 Aug;75(3):538-47
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Climate change
Emotions
Food Supply
Health status
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Male
Mental Health - ethnology
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Nunavut - epidemiology
Qualitative Research
Young Adult
Abstract
As climate change impacts are felt around the globe, people are increasingly exposed to changes in weather patterns, wildlife and vegetation, and water and food quality, access and availability in their local regions. These changes can impact human health and well-being in a variety of ways: increased risk of foodborne and waterborne diseases; increased frequency and distribution of vector-borne disease; increased mortality and injury due to extreme weather events and heat waves; increased respiratory and cardiovascular disease due to changes in air quality and increased allergens in the air; and increased susceptibility to mental and emotional health challenges. While climate change is a global phenomenon, the impacts are experienced most acutely in place; as such, a sense of place, place-attachment, and place-based identities are important indicators for climate-related health and adaptation. Representing one of the first qualitative case studies to examine the connections among climate change, a changing sense of place, and health in an Inuit context, this research draws data from a multi-year community-driven case study situated in the Inuit community of Rigolet, Nunatsiavut, Canada. Data informing this paper were drawn from the narrative analysis of 72 in-depth interviews conducted from November 2009 to October 2010, as well as from the descriptive analysis of 112 questionnaires from a survey in October 2010 (95% response rate). The findings illustrated that climate change is negatively affecting feelings of place attachment by disrupting hunting, fishing, foraging, trapping, and traveling, and changing local landscapes-changes which subsequently impact physical, mental, and emotional health and well-being. These results also highlight the need to develop context-specific climate-health planning and adaptation programs, and call for an understanding of place-attachment as a vital indicator of health and well-being and for climate change to be framed as an important determinant of health.
PubMed ID
22595069 View in PubMed
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Healthcare use for acute gastrointestinal illness in two Inuit communities: Rigolet and Iqaluit, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263115
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:26290
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Sherilee L Harper
Victoria L Edge
James Ford
M Kate Thomas
David Pearl
Jamal Shirley
Scott A McEwen
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:26290
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The incidence of self-reported acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) in Rigolet, Nunatsiavut, and Iqaluit, Nunavut, is higher than reported elsewhere in Canada; as such, understanding AGI-related healthcare use is important for healthcare provision, public health practice and surveillance of AGI.
This study described symptoms, severity and duration of self-reported AGI in the general population and examined the incidence and factors associated with healthcare utilization for AGI in these 2 Inuit communities.
Cross-sectional survey data were analysed using multivariable exact logistic regression to examine factors associated with individuals' self-reported healthcare and over-the-counter (OTC) medication utilization related to AGI symptoms.
In Rigolet, few AGI cases used healthcare services [4.8% (95% CI=1.5-14.4%)]; in Iqaluit, some cases used healthcare services [16.9% (95% CI=11.2-24.7%)]. Missing traditional activities due to AGI (OR=3.8; 95% CI=1.18-12.4) and taking OTC medication for AGI symptoms (OR=3.8; 95% CI=1.2-15.1) were associated with increased odds of using healthcare services in Iqaluit. In both communities, AGI severity and secondary symptoms (extreme tiredness, headache, muscle pains, chills) were significantly associated with increased odds of taking OTC medication.
While rates of self-reported AGI were higher in Inuit communities compared to non-Inuit communities in Canada, there were lower rates of AGI-related healthcare use in Inuit communities compared to other regions in Canada. As such, the rates of healthcare use for a given disease can differ between Inuit and non-Inuit communities, and caution should be exercised in making comparisons between Inuit and non-Inuit health outcomes based solely on clinic records and healthcare use.
PubMed ID
26001982 View in PubMed
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The hidden costs: Identification of indirect costs associated with acute gastrointestinal illness in an Inuit community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294164
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(5):e0196990
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Nia King
Rachael Vriezen
Victoria L Edge
James Ford
Michele Wood
Sherilee Harper
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(5):e0196990
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cost Allocation
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
National Health Programs - economics
Abstract
Acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) incidence and per-capita healthcare expenditures are higher in some Inuit communities as compared to elsewhere in Canada. Consequently, there is a demand for strategies that will reduce the individual-level costs of AGI; this will require a comprehensive understanding of the economic costs of AGI. However, given Inuit communities' unique cultural, economic, and geographic contexts, there is a knowledge gap regarding the context-specific indirect costs of AGI borne by Inuit community members. This study aimed to identify the major indirect costs of AGI, and explore factors associated with these indirect costs, in the Inuit community of Rigolet, Canada, in order to develop a case-based context-specific study framework that can be used to evaluate these costs.
A mixed methods study design and community-based methods were used. Qualitative in-depth, group, and case interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis to identify and describe indirect costs of AGI specific to Rigolet. Data from two quantitative cross-sectional retrospective surveys were analyzed using univariable regression models to examine potential associations between predictor variables and the indirect costs.
The most notable indirect costs of AGI that should be incorporated into cost-of-illness evaluations were the tangible costs related to missing paid employment and subsistence activities, as well as the intangible costs associated with missing community and cultural events. Seasonal cost variations should also be considered. This study was intended to inform cost-of-illness studies conducted in Rigolet and other similar research settings. These results contribute to a better understanding of the economic impacts of AGI on Rigolet residents, which could be used to help identify priority areas and resource allocation for public health policies and programs.
Notes
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