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Community-based adaptation research in the Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276482
Source
Wiley Interdiscip Rev Clim Change. 2016 Mar-Apr;7(2):175-191
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
  1 document  
Author
James D Ford
Ellie Stephenson
Ashlee Cunsolo Willox
Victoria Edge
Khosrow Farahbakhsh
Christopher Furgal
Sherilee Harper
Susan Chatwood
Ian Mauro
Tristan Pearce
Stephanie Austin
Anna Bunce
Alejandra Bussalleu
Jahir Diaz
Kaitlyn Finner
Allan Gordon
Catherine Huet
Knut Kitching
Marie-Pierre Lardeau
Graham McDowell
Ellen McDonald
Lesya Nakoneczny
Mya Sherman
Source
Wiley Interdiscip Rev Clim Change. 2016 Mar-Apr;7(2):175-191
Date
2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
191611
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Adaptation
Communities
Traditional knowledge
Abstract
Community-based adaptation (CBA) has emerged over the last decade as an approach to empowering communities to plan for and cope with the impacts of climate change. While such approaches have been widely advocated, few have critically examined the tensions and challenges that CBA brings. Responding to this gap, this article critically examines the use of CBA approaches with Inuit communities in Canada. We suggest that CBA holds significant promise to make adaptation research more democratic and responsive to local needs, providing a basis for developing locally appropriate adaptations based on local/indigenous and Western knowledge. Yet, we argue that CBA is not a panacea, and its common portrayal as such obscures its limitations, nuances, and challenges. Indeed, if uncritically adopted, CBA can potentially lead to maladaptation, may be inappropriate in some instances, can legitimize outside intervention and control, and may further marginalize communities. We identify responsibilities for researchers engaging in CBA work to manage these challenges, emphasizing the centrality of how knowledge is generated, the need for project flexibility and openness to change, and the importance of ensuring partnerships between researchers and communities are transparent. Researchers also need to be realistic about what CBA can achieve, and should not assume that research has a positive role to play in community adaptation just because it utilizes participatory approaches. WIREs Clim Change 2016, 7:175-191. doi: 10.1002/wcc.376 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.
PubMed ID
27668014 View in PubMed
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Seasonal prevalence and determinants of food insecurity in Iqaluit, Nunavut.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265325
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:27284
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Yang Guo
Lea Berrang-Ford
James Ford
Marie-Pierre Lardeau
Victoria Edge
Kaitlin Patterson
Sherilee L Harper
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:27284
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Food insecurity is an ongoing problem in the Canadian Arctic. Although most studies have focused on smaller communities, little is known about food insecurity in larger centres.
This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of food insecurity during 2 different seasons in Iqaluit, the territorial capital of Nunavut, as well as identify associated risk factors.
A modified United States Department of Agriculture Food Security Survey was applied to 532 randomly selected households in September 2012 and 523 in May 2013. Chi-square tests and multivariable logistic regression were used to examine potential associations between food security and 9 risk factors identified in the literature.
In September 2012, 28.7% of surveyed households in Iqaluit were food insecure, a rate 3 times higher than the national average, but lower than smaller Inuit communities in Nunavut. Prevalence of food insecurity in September 2012 was not significantly different in May 2013 (27.2%). When aggregating results from Inuit households from both seasons (May and September), food insecurity was associated with poor quality housing and reliance on income support (p
PubMed ID
26248959 View in PubMed
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