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Motivation, justification, normalization: talk strategies used by Canadian medical tourists regarding their choices to go abroad for hip and knee surgeries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104935
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2014 Apr;106:93-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Keri Cameron
Valorie A Crooks
Vera Chouinard
Jeremy Snyder
Rory Johnston
Victoria Casey
Author Affiliation
School of Geography and Earth Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4L8, Canada. Electronic address: camerkl@mcmaster.ca.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2014 Apr;106:93-100
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee
Canada
Choice Behavior
Female
Humans
Male
Medical Tourism - psychology
Middle Aged
Motivation
Narration
Qualitative Research
Abstract
Contributing to health geography scholarship on the topic, the objective of this paper is to reveal Canadian medical tourists' perspectives regarding their choices to seek knee replacement or hip replacement or resurfacing (KRHRR) at medical tourism facilities abroad rather than domestically. We address this objective by examining the 'talk strategies' used by these patients in discussing their choices and the ways in which such talk is co-constructed by others. Fourteen interviews were conducted with Canadians aged 42-77 who had gone abroad for KRHRR. Three types of talk strategies emerged through thematic analysis of their narratives: motivation, justification, and normalization talk. Motivation talk referenced participants' desires to maintain or resume physical activity, employment, and participation in daily life. Justification talk emerged when participants described how limitations in the domestic system drove them abroad. Finally, being a medical tourist was talked about as being normal on several bases. Among other findings, the use of these three talk strategies in patients' narratives surrounding medical tourism for KRHRR offers new insight into the language-health-place interconnection. Specifically, they reveal the complex ways in which medical tourists use talk strategies to assert the soundness of their choice to shift the site of their own medical care on a global scale while also anticipating, if not even guarding against, criticism of what ultimately is their own patient mobility. These talk strategies provide valuable insight into why international patients are opting to engage in the spatially explicit practice of medical tourism and who and what are informing their choices.
PubMed ID
24556288 View in PubMed
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Use of medical tourism for hip and knee surgery in osteoarthritis: a qualitative examination of distinctive attitudinal characteristics among Canadian patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118780
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:417
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Valorie A Crooks
Keri Cameron
Vera Chouinard
Rory Johnston
Jeremy Snyder
Victoria Casey
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Dr, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6, Canada. crooks@sfu.ca
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:417
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - psychology
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - psychology
Attitude to Health
Canada
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medical Tourism - psychology
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Hip - surgery
Osteoarthritis, Knee - surgery
Patient satisfaction
Abstract
Medical tourism is the term that describes patients' international travel with the intention of seeking medical treatment. Some medical tourists go abroad for orthopaedic surgeries, including hip and knee resurfacing and replacement. In this article we examine the findings of interviews with Canadian medical tourists who went abroad for such surgeries to determine what is distinctive about their attitudes when compared to existing qualitative research findings about patients' decision-making in and experiences of these same procedures in their home countries.
Fourteen Canadian medical tourists participated in semi-structured phone interviews, all of whom had gone abroad for hip or knee surgery to treat osteoarthritis. Transcripts were coded and thematically analysed, which involved comparing emerging findings to those in the existing qualitative literature on hip and knee surgery.
Three distinctive attitudinal characteristics among participants were identified when interview themes were compared to findings in the existing qualitative research on hip and knee surgery in osteoarthritis. These attitudinal characteristics were that the medical tourists we spoke with were: (1) comfortable health-related decision-makers; (2) unwavering in their views about procedure necessity and urgency; and (3) firm in their desires to maintain active lives.
Compared to other patients reported on in the existing qualitative hip and knee surgery literature, medical tourists are less likely to question their need for surgery and are particularly active in their pursuit of surgical intervention. They are also comfortable with taking control of health-related decisions. Future research is needed to identify motivators behind patients' pursuit of care abroad, determine if the attitudinal characteristics identified here hold true for other patient groups, and ascertain the impact of these attitudinal characteristics on surgical outcomes. Arthritis care providers can use the attitudinal characteristics identified here to better advise osteoarthritis patients who are considering seeking care abroad.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23170924 View in PubMed
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