Skip header and navigation

Refine By

31 records – page 1 of 4.

A 10-Year Follow-Up of Adiposity and Dementia in Swedish Adults Aged 70 Years and Older.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300956
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 63(4):1325-1335
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Ilse A C Arnoldussen
Valter Sundh
Kristoffer Bäckman
Silke Kern
Svante Östling
Kaj Blennow
Henrik Zetterberg
Ingmar Skoog
Amanda J Kiliaan
Deborah R Gustafson
Author Affiliation
Department of Anatomy, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 63(4):1325-1335
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adiponectin - blood
Adiposity
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Dementia - blood - epidemiology - pathology
Fasting
Female
Humans
Independent living
Leptin - blood
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
Adiposity measured in mid- or late-life and estimated using anthropometric measures such as body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), or metabolic markers such as blood leptin and adiponectin levels, is associated with late-onset dementia risk. However, during later life, this association may reverse and aging- and dementia-related processes may differentially affect adiposity measures.
We explored associations of concurrent BMI, WHR, and blood leptin and high molecular weight adiponectin levels with dementia occurrence.
924 Swedish community-dwelling elderly without dementia, aged 70 years and older, systematically-sampled by birth day and birth year population-based in the Gothenburg city region of Sweden. The Gothenburg Birth Cohort Studies are designed for evaluating risk and protective factors for dementia. All dementias diagnosed after age 70 for 10 years were identified. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to predict dementia occurrence between 2000-2005, 2005-2010, and 2000-2010 after excluding prevalent baseline (year 2000) dementias. Baseline levels of BMI, WHR, leptin, and adiponectin were used.
Within 5 years of baseline, low BMI (
PubMed ID
29758945 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 32-year longitudinal study of alcohol consumption in Swedish women: Reduced risk of myocardial infarction but increased risk of cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275258
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(3):153-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Dominique Hange
Jóhann A Sigurdsson
Cecilia Björkelund
Valter Sundh
Calle Bengtsson
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(3):153-62
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Beer
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Ethanol - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - prevention & control
Neoplasms - etiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Stroke - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess associations between the intake of different types of alcoholic beverages and the 32-year incidence of myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, and cancer, as well as mortality, in a middle-aged female population.
Prospective study.
Gothenburg, Sweden, population about 430 000.
Representative sample of a general population of women (1462 in total) aged 38 to 60 years in 1968-1969, followed up to the ages of 70 to 92 years in 2000-2001.
Associations between alcohol intake and later risk of mortality and morbidity from myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, and cancer, studied longitudinally.
During the follow-up period, 185 women developed myocardial infarction, 162 developed stroke, 160 women became diabetic, and 345 developed cancer. Women who drank beer had a 30% lower risk (hazards ratio (HR) 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.50-0.95) of developing myocardial infarcion and almost half the risk (HR 0.51 CI 0.33-0.80). A significant association between increased risk of death from cancer and high spirits consumption was also shown (hazards ratio [HR] 1.47, CI 1.06-2.05).
Women with moderate consumption of beer had a reduced risk of developing myocardial infarction. High spirits consumption was associated with increased risk of cancer mortality.
Notes
Cites: Acta Med Scand. 1973 Apr;193(4):311-84717311
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Dec;82(6):1336-4516332668
Cites: Scand J Soc Med. 1989;17(2):141-52749200
Cites: Addiction. 1993 Jan;88(1):101-128448498
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2007 May;18(4):361-7317364225
Cites: Circulation. 2007 Sep 11;116(11):1306-1717846344
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Mar 15;167(6):684-9118222934
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2010 Sep 22;102(18):1422-3120733117
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2010;10:25820482788
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2009 Feb;33(2):324-3119032575
Cites: J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2012 Jan;73(1):80-822152665
Cites: Drug Alcohol Rev. 2012 Jun;31(4):422-3021726310
Cites: J Interpers Violence. 2012 Sep;27(13):2703-2722890980
Cites: Diabetologia. 2012 Dec;55(12):3228-3722935962
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2000 Sep 19;133(6):411-910975958
Cites: Addiction. 2001 Nov;96(11):1575-8811784455
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2003 Dec;21(4):242-714695076
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2004 Feb 3;140(3):211-914757619
Cites: Stroke. 2004 May;35(5):1124-915017008
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2004 Jun;22(2):101-515255490
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1994 Apr;48(2):1068189160
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1994 Feb;18(1):88-968198232
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1995 May 11;332(19):1245-507708067
Cites: BMJ. 1996 Mar 23;312(7033):731-68605457
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 1998 Sep-Oct;33(5):533-409811207
Cites: BMJ. 1999 Jun 26;318(7200):1725-910381706
Cites: Lancet. 1979 May 12;1(8124):1017-2086728
PubMed ID
26194171 View in PubMed
Less detail

Birthweight and mortality in adulthood: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136987
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2011 Jun;40(3):647-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Kari R Risnes
Lars J Vatten
Jennifer L Baker
Karen Jameson
Ulla Sovio
Eero Kajantie
Merete Osler
Ruth Morley
Markus Jokela
Rebecca C Painter
Valter Sundh
Geir W Jacobsen
Johan G Eriksson
Thorkild I A Sørensen
Michael B Bracken
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. kari.risnes@ntnu.no
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2011 Jun;40(3):647-61
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Birth weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death - trends
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mortality - trends
Neoplasms - mortality
Norway
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Abstract
Small birth size may be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), whereas large birth size may predict increased risk of obesity and some cancers. The net effect of birth size on long-term mortality has only been assessed in individual studies, with conflicting results.
The Meta-analyses of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) guidelines for conducting and reporting meta-analysis of observational studies were followed. We retrieved 22 studies that assessed the association between birthweight and adult mortality from all causes, CVD or cancer. The studies were systematically reviewed and those reporting hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) per kilogram (kg) increase in birthweight were included in generic inverse variance meta-analyses.
For all-cause mortality, 36,834 deaths were included and the results showed a 6% lower risk (adjusted HR?=?0.94, 95% CI: 0.92-0.97) per kg higher birthweight for men and women combined. For cardiovascular mortality, the corresponding inverse association was stronger (HR?=?0.88, 95% CI: 0.85-0.91). For cancer mortality, HR per kg higher birthweight was 1.13 (95% CI: 1.07-1.19) for men and 1.04 (95% CI: 0.98-1.10) for women (P(interaction)?=?0.03). Residual confounding could not be eliminated, but is unlikely to account for the main findings.
These results show an inverse but moderate association of birthweight with adult mortality from all-causes and a stronger inverse association with cardiovascular mortality. For men, higher birthweight was strongly associated with increased risk of cancer deaths. The findings suggest that birthweight can be a useful indicator of processes that influence long-term health.
PubMed ID
21324938 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cohort differences in personality in middle-aged women during a 36-year period. Results from the Population Study of Women in Gothenburg.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96556
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Jul;38(5):457-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Malin André
Lauren Lissner
Calle Bengtsson
Tore Hällström
Valter Sundh
Cecilia Björkelund
Author Affiliation
Centre for Clinical Research, Dalarna, Falun, Sweden. malin.andre@ltdalarna.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Jul;38(5):457-64
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Personality
Personality Assessment
Personality Inventory
Questionnaires
Social Change
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Women - psychology
Abstract
AIM: To investigate secular trends in personality traits in adult female populations. METHODS: Two representative, population-based cohorts of women, 38 (n = 318) and 50 (n = 593) years of age participated in a health examination in 1968 and 2004 in Gothenburg, Sweden. The Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI) and Cesarec-Marke Personality Schedule (CMPS) were used to measure personality traits. Socioeconomic and lifestyle variables (personal income, education, marital status, children at home, physical activity and smoking) were reported. RESULTS: In both age groups, secular comparisons in psychological profile subscales showed an increase in dominance, exhibition, aggression and achievement. Only small divergences were seen concerning affiliation, guilt feelings, nurturance and succorance. EPI showed a corresponding rise in extroversion. Social data showed a statistically significant increase in percentage of unmarried women, personal income levels, and higher educational achievement. While around 70% of women in 1968-69 had elementary school education only, around 90% had high school or university education in 2004-05. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate major transitions in the adult Swedish female population in the direction of a more stereotypically ''male'' personality profile, but not at the expense of traditionally socially important female traits, which remained constant. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that society and the environment influence personality.
PubMed ID
20576674 View in PubMed
Less detail

The compression of morbidity debate in aging: an empirical test using the gerontological and geriatric population studies in Göteborg, Sweden (H70).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183545
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2003 Nov-Dec;37(3):213-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
Richard M Hessler
Bo G Eriksson
Debashish Dey
Gunilla Steen
Valter Sundh
Bertil Steen
Author Affiliation
Sociology Department, University of Missouri-Columbia, 303A Middlebush Hall, Columbia, MO 65211, USA. hessler@missouri.edu
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2003 Nov-Dec;37(3):213-22
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Female
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Life expectancy
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Morbidity - trends
Survival Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
The H70 longitudinal study of aging, Göteborg, Sweden is used to empirically test the compression of morbidity theory advanced by. We reconceptualize compression as postponement of morbidity in the sense of decreasing amounts of illness for increasingly long life spans. Operationally, morbidity is defined as the average number of hospital days in the last year of life. The date of death and the date of 1-year prior to death define the risk period. The linear regression model with age at death, age at death squared, year of birth, and sex are statistically significant with the oldest having the fewest hospital days. The findings offer partial support for the compression of morbidity theory.
PubMed ID
14511847 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dairy product intake and mortality in a cohort of 70-year-old Swedes: a contribution to the Nordic diet discussion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299664
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2018 Dec; 57(8):2869-2876
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Gianluca Tognon
Elisabet Rothenberg
Martina Petrolo
Valter Sundh
Lauren Lissner
Author Affiliation
Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine (EPSO), Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 453, SE 405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden. gianluca@gianlucatognon.it.
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2018 Dec; 57(8):2869-2876
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Animals
Cheese
Cohort Studies
Dairy Products
Diet
European Continental Ancestry Group
Exercise
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Milk
Mortality
Nutrition Assessment
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Sweden
Yogurt
Abstract
Conflicting results in the literature exist on the role of dairy products in the context of a Nordic Healthy Diet (NHD). Two recent Swedish studies indicate both negative and positive associations with total mortality when comparing key dairy products. There is no consensus about how to include these foods into the NHD.
To study consumption of cheese and milk products (milk, sour milk and unsweetened yoghurt) by 70-year-old Swedes in relation to all-cause mortality.
Cox proportional hazard models, adjusted for potential confounders and stratified by follow-up duration, were used to assess the prediction of all-cause mortality by the above foods. The associations of fat from cheese and milk products with mortality were tested in separate models.
Cheese intake inversely predicted total mortality, particularly at high protein intakes, and this association decreased in strength with increasing follow-up time. Milk products predicted increased mortality with stable HRs over follow-up. The association between milk products and mortality was strongly influenced by the group with the highest consumption. Fat from cheese mirrored the protective association of cheese intake with mortality, whereas fat from milk products predicted excess mortality, but only in an energy-adjusted model.
Based on our results, it may be argued that the role of dairy products in the context of a Nordic healthy diet should be more clearly defined by disaggregating cheese and milk products and not necessarily focusing on dairy fat content. Future epidemiological research should consider dairy products as disaggregated food items due to their great diversity in health properties.
PubMed ID
29080977 View in PubMed
Less detail

Determinants of sexual activity in four birth cohorts of Swedish 70-year-olds examined 1971-2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256382
Source
J Sex Med. 2014 Feb;11(2):401-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Nils Beckman
Margda Waern
Svante Östling
Valter Sundh
Ingmar Skoog
Author Affiliation
Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
J Sex Med. 2014 Feb;11(2):401-10
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Coitus - physiology - psychology
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Marriage
Personal Satisfaction
Sexual Partners
Sexuality - physiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Knowledge about determinants of sexual activity in older adults in the general population is limited. Human senescence has been delayed by a decade, and people are reaching old age in better health.
The aim of this study was to investigate determinants of sexual activity in four birth cohorts of non-demented 70-year-olds examined in 1971-1977 and 1992-2001.
The main outcome measure was sexual activity (defined as intercourse) during the past year.
The study is based on cross-sectional data from four population samples of 70-year-olds from Gothenburg, Sweden (N = 1,407) systematically sampled from the Swedish population register.
In the time periods 1971-1972 and 2000-2001, sexual activity among men increased from 47% to 66%, and in women from 12% to 34%. Sexual activity was related to positive attitude toward sexuality, sexual debut before age 20, having a very happy relationship, having a physically and mentally healthy partner, self-reported good global health, interviewer-rated good mental health, being married/cohabiting, satisfaction with sleep, and drinking alcohol more than three times a week. Having an older partner, diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, higher physical health-sum score, and depression were related to less sexual activity. Interaction effects for birth cohort, with stronger positive associations in 1971-1972, were found for positive attitude toward sexuality, strong desire at age 20-30, premarital sexuality, having a younger partner, self-reported good global health, interviewer-rated good global mental health, overweight, and satisfaction with sleep. Having an older partner and depression showed stronger negative associations in the 1970s. Physical health-sum score showed a stronger negative association in 1992-2001.
We found that determinants of sexual activity in older people are numerous and varied, and change over time. It is thus important that health professionals and others take a holistic approach when dealing with sexual problems in older adults. Sexual aging should be part of health care and medical education. Clinicians should be trained to ask older patients about sexual concerns.
PubMed ID
24251617 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does the Mediterranean diet predict longevity in the elderly? A Swedish perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139035
Source
Age (Dordr). 2011 Sep;33(3):439-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Gianluca Tognon
Elisabet Rothenberg
Gabriele Eiben
Valter Sundh
Anna Winkvist
Lauren Lissner
Author Affiliation
Public Health Epidemiology Unit, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg, Sweden. gianluca.tognon@gu.se
Source
Age (Dordr). 2011 Sep;33(3):439-50
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Diet, Mediterranean
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Longevity
Male
Sweden
Abstract
Dietary pattern analysis represents a useful improvement in the investigation of diet and health relationships. Particularly, the Mediterranean diet pattern has been associated with reduced mortality risk in several studies involving both younger and elderly population groups. In this research, relationships between dietary macronutrient composition, as well as the Mediterranean diet, and total mortality were assessed in 1,037 seventy-year-old subjects (540 females) information. Diet macronutrient composition was not associated with mortality, while a refined version of the modified Mediterranean diet index showed a significant inverse association (HR=0.93, 95% CI: 0.89; 0.98). As expected, inactive subjects, smokers and those with a higher waist circumference had a higher mortality, while a reduced risk characterized married and more educated people. Sensitivity analyses (which confirmed our results) consisted of: exclusion of one food group at a time in the Mediterranean diet index, exclusion of early deaths, censoring at fixed follow-up time, adjusting for activities of daily living and main cardiovascular risk factors including weight/waist circumference changes at follow up. In conclusion, we can reasonably state that a higher adherence to a Mediterranean diet pattern, especially by consuming wholegrain cereals, foods rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids, and a limited amount of alcohol, predicts increased longevity in the elderly.
Notes
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2005 Feb;34(1):54-6015649959
Cites: Circulation. 1999 Feb 16;99(6):779-859989963
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2005 Jul;29(7):810-715917864
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2006 Aug;96(2):384-9216923235
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2006 Oct;60(10):1145-5916670693
Cites: Circulation. 2008 Jul 15;118(3):214-518625902
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2009 Apr;22(4):409-1619197247
Cites: J Am Coll Nutr. 2009 Aug;28 Suppl:500S-516S20234038
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2010 Mar 30;55(13):1328-3520338493
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Jul;92(1):47-5420484450
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2010 Nov;34(11):1961-7120735372
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2003 Feb;93(2):318-2312554593
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Jun 1;157(11):980-812777361
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2003 Dec;21(4):242-714695076
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2004 Aug;7(5):637-4415251054
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Sep 22;292(12):1433-915383513
Cites: Scand J Rehabil Med. 1991;23(4):193-2021785028
Cites: Lancet. 1994 Jun 11;343(8911):1454-97911176
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1995 Jun;61(6 Suppl):1402S-1406S7754995
Cites: BMJ. 1995 Dec 2;311(7018):1457-608520331
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 1997 Jan;51(1):60-69023469
Cites: BMJ. 1997 Jul 5;315(7099):13-79233319
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 1997 Dec;15(4):214-99444727
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 1998 Nov;52(11):832-89846597
Cites: BMJ. 2005 Apr 30;330(7498):99115820966
PubMed ID
21110231 View in PubMed
Less detail

Do systolic murmurs predict mortality in the elderly? A 15-year longitudinal population study of 70-year-olds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53424
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2004 Mar-Apr;38(2):191-200
Publication Type
Article
Author
Debashish Kumar Dey
Valter Sundh
Bertil Steen
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy with Göteborg University, Gibraltargatan 1C, Göteborg 411 32, Sweden. debahiish.dey@lycos.com
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2004 Mar-Apr;38(2):191-200
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - mortality
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Heart Murmurs - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Prevalence
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Systole
Abstract
Systolic murmurs are common in the elderly but there is a striking paucity regarding published reports on their clinical significance and relation with mortality. This study describes prevalence of systolic murmurs in the elderly and cardiovascular diseases in 70-year-olds with or without systolic murmurs, and investigates the relation between systolic murmurs at age 70 and 15-year mortality. This cohort study is based on 973 (449 males and 524 females) 70-year-olds from Göteborg, Sweden who were examined in 1971/1972 at the Department of Geriatric Medicine, Göteborg University, and was followed-up to the year 2001. The prevalence of systolic murmur was 31% (females 36.4%, males 23.9%). Among subjects with systolic murmurs the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) and hypertension was significantly higher in both sexes and congestive heart failure (CHF) in females only. Systolic murmur was a predictor for mortality in females (RR 1.49, 95% CI 1.17-1.91) but not in males (RR 1.14, 95% CI 0.89-1.49). Diagnosis of a cardiovascular disease was a significant predictor in both sexes for mortality irrespective of having systolic murmurs. In conclusion, there is a significant positive association of cardiovascular diseases with systolic murmurs in the elderly. The increased risk for mortality due to the presence of systolic murmur at age 70 is mediated through cardiovascular diseases.
PubMed ID
14698498 View in PubMed
Less detail

ECG abnormalities in the elderly: prevalence, time and generation trends and association with mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45844
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2003 Dec;15(6):488-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Ulla Molander
Debashish Kumar Dey
Valter Sundh
Bertil Steen
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. ulla.molander@geriatrik.gu.se
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2003 Dec;15(6):488-93
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Atrial Fibrillation - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Atrial Flutter - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Bundle-Branch Block - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Electrocardiography
Female
Heart Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities are often found in older patients but relatively few epidemiological studies have been performed. This study describes: a) cross-sectional differences in ECG abnormalities among three 70-year-old cohorts born over a period of 30 years; b) longitudinal changes in ECG abnormalities from the age of 70 to 85; and c) the relationship between ECG abnormalities at age 70 and subsequent 10- and 15-year mortality in men and women. METHODS: Trends in the prevalence of ECG abnormalities were investigated among 2100 70-year olds (994 men, 1106 women) from three cohorts born in 1901/02 (I), 1911/12 (III) and 1930 (VI). Longitudinal changes and mortality risks were investigated among 973 70-year olds (449 men and 524 women) from cohort I, which was followed from 1971 until 2001. RESULTS: In both sexes, the prevalence of ECG abnormalities was significantly lower in the later-born cohorts. From age 70 to 85, there was an increase in both men and women of large or intermediate Q-waves, left axis deviation, negative T-waves (0-5 mm), complete right bundle branch block (RBBB), and atrial fibrillation or flutter. Compared with those with no ECG abnormalities, the mortality risk was higher among individuals with large and intermediate Q-waves and negative T-waves (> or = 1 mm) in both sexes, and STJ depression > or = 0.5 mm and complete LBBB together with complete RBBB and intraventricular block; QRS > or = 0.12 sec in men only. CONCLUSIONS: ECG abnormalities are frequent in the elderly, they increase with age, and are associated with increased mortality.
PubMed ID
14959952 View in PubMed
Less detail

31 records – page 1 of 4.