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The experience of being an Anishinabe man healer: ancient healing in a modern world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156448
Source
J Cult Divers. 2008;16(2):70-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Valerie S Eschiti
Beverly Patchell
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
Source
J Cult Divers. 2008;16(2):70-5
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Female
Holistic Health
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Narration
United States
Abstract
The purpose was to understand the experience of being an Anishinabe man healer. Of particular relevance, healers explained how they provide Indigenous health care in a world dominated by Western biomedicine.
A phenomenological approach was utilized to interview four Anishinabe men healers who reside in the United States and Canada.
In-person interviews were conducted using an interview guide. The interviews were audiotaped when permitted; otherwise notes were taken. Data analysis was conducted using techniques from Colaizzi and van Manen.
Seven themes were identified: (1) The Healer's Path, (2) Health as Wholeness, (3) Healing Ways, (4) Healing Stories, (5) Culture Interwoven with Healing, (6) Healing Exchange, and (7) Connection with Western Medicine.
The themes identified inform nursing practice by pointing out the importance of culture within traditional Indigenous healing, as well as the need for a holistic approach when caring for Indigenous people. Additionally, the Indigenous men healers acknowledged their connection with Western medicine as part of the process of healing for their clients. This emphasizes the need for nurses and other health care providers to become knowledgeable regarding traditional Indigenous healing that their clients may be receiving, in order to foster open communication.
PubMed ID
20666300 View in PubMed
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The experience of being an Anishinabe man healer: ancient healing in a modern world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156015
Source
J Cult Divers. 2008;15(2):70-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Valerie S Eschiti
Beverly Patchell
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
Source
J Cult Divers. 2008;15(2):70-5
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Great Lakes Region
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - education
Health services needs and demand
Holistic Health
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Mythology - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Professional Role - psychology
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Abstract
The purpose was to understand the experience of being an Anishinabe man healer. Of particular relevance, healers explained how they provide Indigenous health care in a world dominated by Western biomedicine.
A phenomenological approach was utilized to interview four Anishinabe men healers who reside in the United States and Canada.
In-person interviews were conducted using an interview guide. The interviews were audiotaped when permitted; otherwise notes were taken. Data analysis was conducted using techniques from Colaizzi and van Manen.
Seven themes were identified: (1) The Healer's Path, (2) Health as Wholeness, (3) Healing Ways, (4) Healing Stories, (5) Culture Interwoven with Healing, (6) Healing Exchange, and (7) Connection with Western Medicine.
The themes identified inform nursing practice by pointing out the importance of culture within traditional Indigenous healing, as well as the need for a holistic approach when caring for Indigenous people. Additionally, the Indigenous men healers acknowledged their connection with Western medicine as part of the process of healing for their clients. This emphasizes the need for nurses and other health care providers to become knowledgeable regarding traditional Indigenous healing that their clients may be receiving, in order to foster open communication.
PubMed ID
18649444 View in PubMed
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The experience of indigenous traditional healing and cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180998
Source
Integr Cancer Ther. 2004 Mar;3(1):13-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Valerie S Eschiti
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota School of Nursing, Minneapolis 55455, USA. strut005@umn.edu
Source
Integr Cancer Ther. 2004 Mar;3(1):13-23
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Breast Neoplasms - ethnology - therapy
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - ethnology - therapy
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - therapy
Prostatic Neoplasms - therapy
Sarcoma - ethnology - therapy
Abstract
Indigenous traditional healing is an ancient, deeply rooted, complex holistic health care system practiced by indigenous people worldwide. However, scant information exists to explain the phenomenon of indigenous medicine and indigenous health. Even less is known about how indigenous healing takes place. The purpose of this study is to describe the meaning and essence of the lived experience of 4 indigenous people who have been diagnosed with cancer and have used indigenous traditional healing during their healing journey. The researcher used a qualitative phenomenological methodology to collect and analyze interview data. Interviews were conducted with 4 self-identified indigenous people, ages 49 to 61, from diverse tribes. Time since cancer diagnosis varied from 2 to 20 years; types of cancer included lung, prostate, sarcoma of the leg, and breast. Four themes and 2 subthemes emerged (1) receiving the cancer diagnosis (with subthemes of knowing something was wrong and hearing something was wrong), (2) seeking healing, (3) connecting to indigenous culture, and (4) contemplating life's future. This study demonstrates that 4 individuals with cancer integrated Western medicine and traditional healing to treat their cancer. This knowledge provides necessary data about the phenomena of being healed by indigenous healers. Such data may serve as an initial guide for health care professionals while interacting with indigenous people diagnosed with cancer. Accordingly, traditional healing may be used to decrease health disparities.
PubMed ID
15035869 View in PubMed
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Holistic approach to resolving American Indian/Alaska Native health care disparities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178928
Source
J Holist Nurs. 2004 Sep;22(3):201-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Valerie S Eschiti
Author Affiliation
Midwestern State University, Wilson School of Nursing, Wichita Falls, Texas, USA.
Source
J Holist Nurs. 2004 Sep;22(3):201-8
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Diversity
Health Promotion - standards
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Health services needs and demand
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Holistic Health
Holistic Nursing - education - standards
Humans
Indians, North American
Nurse's Role
United States
Abstract
There is increasing public attention on the health care disparities that exist among minority populations. Recent focus is on the need to identify ways health disparities can be reduced. The American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations are minorities experiencing grave health care disparities. From a Native view, what adversely affects 1 part of society ultimately impacts the rest of it. It is necessary to keep the Native population as healthy as possible for the United States to maintain its health as a nation. Holistic nursing, with its core value of cultural diversity, is an ideal framework in which to foster promotion and maintenance of health for AI/AN people. The purpose of this article is to describe some of the health care disparities experienced by Native people and holistic approaches for resolution. These approaches include providing culturally appropriate health education, promoting educational opportunities in nursing for AI/AN people, and mentoring Native nursing students and new nurses.
PubMed ID
15296575 View in PubMed
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Traditional indigenous healing: Part I.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179069
Source
Complement Ther Nurs Midwifery. 2004 Aug;10(3):141-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Roxanne Struthers
V S Valerie S Eschiti
Beverly Patchell
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota School of Nursing, 6-101 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard St SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. strut005@umn.edu
Source
Complement Ther Nurs Midwifery. 2004 Aug;10(3):141-9
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Cultural Characteristics
Holistic Health
Humans
Indians, North American
Medicine, Traditional
Mind-Body Relations, Metaphysical
Nursing Methodology Research
Spirituality
Abstract
Traditional indigenous healing is widely used today, as it has been since time immemorial. This article describes the following areas in regards to traditional healing: (a) an explanation of indigenous peoples, (b) a definition of traditional indigenous healing, (c) a portrayal of traditional healers, (d) health within indigenous culture, (e) traditional healing techniques, (f) utilization of traditional healing, (g) how to find a traditional healer, and (h) comparing traditional healing principles with mainstream ways. It is important to have knowledge about this method of holistic healing so health care providers and nurses can integrate it into the health care for individuals and/or families that choose traditional indigenous healing.
PubMed ID
15279855 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.