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The ability of general practitioners to detect mental disorders in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216423
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Jan;91(1):52-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1995
Author
M. Joukamaa
V. Lehtinen
H. Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Jan;91(1):52-6
Date
Jan-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Graduate
Family Practice - education
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Patient care team
Primary Health Care
Psychiatry - education
Psychophysiologic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Sampling Studies
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Abstract
The ability to detect mental disorders varies greatly among general practitioners in primary health care. The aim of this study was to determine the factors underlying the differences between general practitioners in the ability to recognize mental disorders in Finnish patient populations. The group studied consisted of 1000 randomly selected adult patients of primary care facilities in the city of Turku. The Symptom Checklist (SCL-25) was used as the reference method in the identification of psychiatric cases. According to the SCL-25, one fourth of the sample had mental disorders. A good recognition ability was associated with postgraduate psychiatric training and qualification as a specialist in general practice. Surprisingly, Balint group training, which is a method intended to improve the ability of general practitioners to manage their patients' mental health problems, was associated rather with poor than good detection ability.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Oct;92(4):3198848961
PubMed ID
7754788 View in PubMed
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Alexithymia and psychological distress among frequent attendance patients in health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213347
Source
Psychother Psychosom. 1996;65(4):199-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
M. Joukamaa
H. Karlsson
B. Sholman
V. Lehtinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Psychother Psychosom. 1996;65(4):199-202
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology - psychology
Causality
Chi-Square Distribution
Comorbidity
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Sampling Studies
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to find out whether alexithymia is common in frequently attending primary health care patients and whether alexithymia and psychological distress are associated in these patients.
Alexithymia was measured by the TAS-26 and psychological distress by the SCL-25 in a random sample of 394 working-age primary health care patients. Frequent attendance was defined as a minimum of 11 visits during 1 year to different kinds of outpatient health care services, excluding specialized psychiatric care.
Frequently attending patients with psychological distress were found to be alexithymic more commonly than other patients, but this was not the case with other frequently attending patients. In other words, frequent attendance and alexithymia had an association mediated by psychological distress.
There is a subgroup of frequently attending patients, who are alexithymic and have psychological distress, too. They usually visit health-care services because of a somatic complaint. We hypothesize that their expression of psychological distress was masked and somatized just because of alexithymia.
PubMed ID
8843500 View in PubMed
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Alexithymic features in relation to the dexamethasone suppression test in a Finnish population sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228416
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 1990 Sep;147(9):1216-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1990
Author
T. Lindholm
V. Lehtinen
M T Hyyppä
P. Puukka
Author Affiliation
Rehabilitation Research Center, Turku, Finland.
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 1990 Sep;147(9):1216-9
Date
Sep-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Affective Symptoms - blood - diagnosis - psychology
Age Factors
Aged
Depressive Disorder - blood - diagnosis
Dexamethasone - diagnostic use
Female
Finland
Humans
Hydrocortisone - blood
Male
Marriage
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Sex Factors
Social Class
Stress, Psychological - blood - diagnosis - psychology
Abstract
Hypothesizing that a positive DST result could reflect an aberrant stress reaction in subjects with alexithymic features, the authors investigated the relationship between alexithymic features and DST results in 266 subjects from a Finnish adult population sample. Alexithymic features were assessed with the Beth Israel Questionnaire. The authors found a statistically significant association between observed alexithymic features and a positive DST result. This association could be seen after adjustment separately for age, social rank, marital status, and the occurrence of depression.
PubMed ID
2386254 View in PubMed
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Coercion and restrictions in psychiatric inpatient treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198006
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2000 May;15(3):213-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
R. Kaltiala-Heino
J. Korkeila
C. Tuohimäki
T. Tuori
V. Lehtinen
Author Affiliation
University of Tampere, Tampere School of Public Health and Tampere University Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2000 May;15(3):213-9
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Coercion
Commitment of Mentally Ill - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Isolation - utilization
Restraint, Physical - utilization
Treatment Refusal - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To find out to what extent coercion and restrictions are used in psychiatric inpatient treatment and with which patient characteristics the use of coercion is associated. To this end, the hospital records of 1,543 admissions (six-month admission samples) to the psychiatric clinics in three Finnish university towns were evaluated by retrospective chart review. The study clinics provide all psychiatric inpatient treatment for the working-age population in their catchment areas. Use of coercion and restrictions was recorded in a structured form. Coercion and restrictions were applied to 32% of the patients. Mechanical restraints were used on 10% of the patients, and forced medication on 8%. Compared to international statistics the figures in the current study are high.
PubMed ID
10881219 View in PubMed
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Depression and cardiovascular diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219289
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1994;377:77-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
A. Aromaa
R. Raitasalo
A. Reunanen
O. Impivaara
M. Heliövaara
P. Knekt
V. Lehtinen
M. Joukamaa
J. Maatela
Author Affiliation
Social Insurance Institution, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1994;377:77-82
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - mortality - psychology
Causality
Cause of Death
Comorbidity
Coronary Disease - mortality - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - complications - mortality - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Abstract
We first review the associations between depression and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Then we examine them in the nationally representative Mini-Finland Health Survey, which covers 8,000 persons. Chronic somatic diseases and mental disorders were diagnosed using standardized methods. Cross-sectionally, CVDs and neurotic depression were associated both before and after adjustment for covariates. The strongest associations were observed in the case of severe CVDs. During a 6.6 year follow-up, the risk of CVD death and coronary death was elevated in depressed persons both with and without CVDs at entry. Much of the cross-sectional association is probably due to depression caused by CVDs. The outcome of CVD may be poorer in depressed persons. The hypothesis that depression is a cause of CVDs requires further study.
PubMed ID
8053372 View in PubMed
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Deprivation of liberty in Finnish psychiatric inpatients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180777
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2004 Mar-Apr;27(2):193-205
Publication Type
Article

Differences between patients with identified and not identified psychiatric disorders in primary care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196476
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2000 Nov;102(5):354-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
H. Karlsson
M. Joukamaa
V. Lehtinen
Author Affiliation
University of Turku, Department of Psychiatry, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2000 Nov;102(5):354-8
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Diagnosis, Differential
Diagnostic Errors - statistics & numerical data
Education
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to discover the differences between the primary care patients with a psychiatric disorder whose illness was detected and the patients whose disorder was not detected.
We collected 1000 randomly selected PC patients. We used SCL-25 as a screening method and PSE as a diagnostic tool.
Ninety-one (89.2%) of the interviewed patients received a psychiatric diagnosis. The physicians detected a disorder in 36 (36.9%). A larger part of the undetected group belonged to the highest social groups. Also the SCL-25 mean scores differed significantly, indicating that the symptoms of the undetected cases were milder. The detected cases had higher levels of anxiety and depression, but the difference in anxiety symptoms was greater between the groups. Detection was associated with treatment.
The GPs should also be aware of psychiatric morbidity in patients with a higher social status, a good level of education and milder symptoms.
PubMed ID
11098807 View in PubMed
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Duration of untreated psychosis and its correlates in first-episode psychosis in Finland and Spain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188605
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2002 Oct;106(4):265-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
O. Kalla
J. Aaltonen
J. Wahlström
V. Lehtinen
I. García Cabeza
M. González de Chávez
Author Affiliation
University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. outi.kalla@psyka.jyu.fi
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2002 Oct;106(4):265-75
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Culture
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - rehabilitation - therapy
Severity of Illness Index
Social Support
Spain
Time Factors
Abstract
To examine the association of duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) with early course characteristics in first-episode psychosis in Finland and Spain.
Eighty-six patients from Finland (49) and Spain (37) were evaluated on various early course characteristics.
The mean value of DUP was 4.0 months (median 2 months) for the Finnish patients and 9.9 months (median 2 months) for the Spanish ones. In both groups, long DUP was associated with insidious onset, poor global functioning, and laboral incapability. Among the Finnish patients exclusively, long DUP correlated with a weak earlier social network, instability of professional identity, long duration of prodromal symptoms, psychological dependency on the family, and criticism by the parents of the patient. Among the Spanish patients only, longer DUP was associated with more severe positive symptoms at admission.
There are universal psychosocial factors influencing DUP, but also cultural differences may have an impact on the treatment delay.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2002 Oct;106(4):249-5112225491
PubMed ID
12225493 View in PubMed
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Elevated lung cancer risk among persons with depressed mood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210350
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1996 Dec 15;144(12):1096-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-1996
Author
P. Knekt
R. Raitasalo
M. Heliövaara
V. Lehtinen
E. Pukkala
L. Teppo
J. Maatela
A. Aromaa
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1996 Dec 15;144(12):1096-103
Date
Dec-15-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Depressive Disorder - complications - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Lung Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Registries
Respiratory Function Tests
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Although it has been hypothesized that depressive persons have an excess risk of cancer, few prospective data are available. The association between depressiveness and subsequent incidence of lung cancer was studied in the nationally representative Mini-Finland Health Survey. The study population comprised 7,018 adult men and women, free from cancer at the baseline, carried out in 1978-1980. During a 14-year follow-up, 605 cancer cases occurred, of which 70 were male lung cancer patients. Mental problems and disorders were assessed at the baseline examination using standard interview techniques (General Health Questionnaire and Present State Examination). The relative risk of lung cancer between depressive persons and individuals with a normal depressiveness score was 3.32 (95% confidence interval 1.53-7.20). Neither adjustment for the potential confounding factors of age, education, geographic area, smoking, alcohol consumption, body mass index, serum cholesterol, leisure-time exercise, general health, and use of antidepressant medication nor exclusion of cancer cases occurring during the first 4 years of follow-up notably altered the results. There was a strong interaction between depressiveness and smoking. The relative risks of lung cancer between smokers and nonsmokers were 3.38 (95% confidence interval 1.09-10.52) at normal depressiveness score levels and 19.67 (95% confidence interval 2.57-150.7) at strongly elevated levels, respectively. It is possible that depressiveness modifies the effect of smoking on lung cancer risk either by biologic mechanisms or by affecting smoking behavior.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Epidemiol. 1996 Dec 15;144(12):1104-68956622
PubMed ID
8956621 View in PubMed
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47 records – page 1 of 5.