Skip header and navigation

Refine By

47 records – page 1 of 5.

Acute injuries in Finnish junior floorball league players.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291741
Source
J Sci Med Sport. 2018 Mar; 21(3):268-273
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Kati Pasanen
Jussi Hietamo
Tommi Vasankari
Pekka Kannus
Ari Heinonen
Urho M Kujala
Ville M Mattila
Jari Parkkari
Author Affiliation
Tampere Research Center of Sports Medicine, UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Finland. Electronic address: kati.pasanen@uta.fi.
Source
J Sci Med Sport. 2018 Mar; 21(3):268-273
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Ankle Injuries - etiology
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hockey - injuries
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Knee Injuries - etiology
Ligaments, Articular - injuries
Male
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
To investigate the incidence and characteristics of acute time-loss injuries in Finnish junior floorball league players.
Prospective cohort study with 3-year follow-up.
One hundred and eighty-six female and male players (mean age 16.6±1.4) took part in the follow-up study (2011-2014). The training hours and games were recorded on a team diary. Floorball related acute injuries were registered and verified by a research physician. The injury incidence was expressed as the number of injuries per 1000h of exposure. Incidence rate was calculated separately for games and practices, and for males and females.
One hundred and forty-four acute time-loss injuries occurred. Injury incidence was 26.87 (95% CI 20.10-33.63) in junior league games, and 1.25 (95% CI 0.99-1.52) in team practices. Female players had significantly higher game injury rate (IRR 1.88, 1.12-3.19) and joint/ligament injury rate (IRR 1.70, 1.07-2.73) compared to males. Eighty-one percent of the injuries affected the lower limbs. The ankle (37%), knee (18%), and thigh (14%) were the most commonly injured body sites. More than half of injuries involved joint or ligaments (54%). Twenty-six percent of the injuries were severe causing more than 28days absence from sports. Eight anterior cruciate ligament ruptures of the knee occurred among seven female players.
The study revealed that risk of ankle and knee ligament injuries is high in adolescent floorball, specifically among female players.
PubMed ID
28716691 View in PubMed
Less detail

All-cause and disease-specific mortality among male, former elite athletes: an average 50-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271045
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2015 Jul;49(13):893-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Jyrki A Kettunen
Urho M Kujala
Jaakko Kaprio
Heli Bäckmand
Markku Peltonen
Johan G Eriksson
Seppo Sarna
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2015 Jul;49(13):893-7
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Cause of Death
Dementia - mortality
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
Sports - statistics & numerical data
Stroke - mortality
Survival Analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate life expectancy and mortality among former elite athletes and controls.
HR analysis of cause-specific deaths sourced from the national death registry for former Finnish male endurance, team and power sports athletes (N=2363) and controls (N=1657). The median follow-up time was 50 years.
Median life expectancy was higher in the endurance (79.1 years, 95% CI 76.6 to 80.6) and team (78.8, 78.1 to 79.8) sports athletes than in controls (72.9, 71.8 to 74.3). Compared to controls, risk for total mortality adjusted for socioeconomic status and birth cohort was lower in the endurance ((HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.79)) and team (0.80, 0.72 to 0.89) sports athletes, and slightly lower in the power sports athletes (0.93, 0.85 to 1.03). HR for ischaemic heart disease mortality was lower in the endurance (0.68, 0.54 to 0.86) and team sports (0.73, 0.60 to 0.89) athletes. HR for stroke mortality was 0.52 (0.33 to 0.83) in the endurance and 0.59 (0.40 to 0.88) in the team sports athletes. Compared to controls, the risk for smoking-related cancer mortality was lower in the endurance (HR 0.20, 0.08 to 0.47) and power sports (0.40, 0.25 to 0.66) athletes. For dementia mortality, the power sports athletes, particularly boxers, had increased risk (HR 4.20, 2.30 to 7.81).
Elite athletes have 5-6 years additional life expectancy when compared to men who were healthy as young adults. Lower mortality for cardiovascular disease was in part due to lower rates of smoking, as tobacco-related cancer mortality was especially low.
PubMed ID
25183628 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between education and future leisure-time physical inactivity: a study of Finnish twins over a 35-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284182
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016 Aug 04;16:720
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-04-2016
Author
Maarit Piirtola
Jaakko Kaprio
Urho M Kujala
Kauko Heikkilä
Markku Koskenvuo
Pia Svedberg
Karri Silventoinen
Annina Ropponen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016 Aug 04;16:720
Date
Aug-04-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Environment
Exercise
Family
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Middle Aged
Sedentary lifestyle
Social Environment
Surveys and Questionnaires
Twins
Young Adult
Abstract
Education is associated with health related lifestyle choices including leisure-time physical inactivity. However, the longitudinal associations between education and inactivity merit further studies. We investigated the association between education and leisure-time physical inactivity over a 35-year follow-up with four time points controlling for multiple covariates including familial confounding.
This study of the population-based Finnish Twin Cohort consisted of 5254 twin individuals born in 1945-1957 (59 % women), of which 1604 were complete same-sexed twin pairs. Data on leisure-time physical activity and multiple covariates was available from four surveys conducted in 1975, 1981, 1990 and 2011 (response rates 72 to 89 %). The association between years of education and leisure-time physical inactivity (
Notes
Cites: Twin Res. 2002 Oct;5(5):358-6512537859
Cites: Twin Res Hum Genet. 2013 Feb;16(1):157-6223298696
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Dec 1;156(11):985-9312446254
Cites: J Health Econ. 2010 Jan;29(1):1-2819963292
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2009 Oct;38(5):1310-2219528192
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2014 Nov;42(7):611-2025201896
Cites: PLoS Med. 2005 Jul;2(7):e16216033303
Cites: Lancet. 2012 Jul 21;380(9838):219-2922818936
Cites: Sports Med. 2012 May 1;42(5):433-4722512413
Cites: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2012 Jun;22(3):439-4721039899
Cites: Perspect Psychol Sci. 2010 Sep;5(5):546-5621593989
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2014 Aug;47(2):123-3024877993
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2011 Oct;40(5):1382-40022039197
Cites: Compr Physiol. 2012 Apr;2(2):1143-21123798298
Cites: J Health Psychol. 2008 Nov;13(8):1092-10418987082
Cites: Lancet. 2012 Dec 15;380(9859):2224-6023245609
Cites: Behav Genet. 2012 Jul;42(4):559-7822426782
Cites: Twin Res Hum Genet. 2014 Aug;17(4):262-7125034445
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1998 Dec;47(11):1665-769877337
Cites: Am Psychol. 1994 Jan;49(1):15-248122813
Cites: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2016 Jan;26(1):93-10025559167
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2014 Apr;24(2):199-20423748597
Cites: Public Health. 2007 Dec;121(12):909-2217920646
Cites: Nat Rev Genet. 2002 Nov;3(11):872-8212415317
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2014 Dec 29;14:132725547275
Cites: Behav Genet. 2000 Nov;30(6):477-8511523706
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2015 Feb;127:181-925110343
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2012 Dec 15;12:107923241280
Cites: Econ Hum Biol. 2014 Jul;14:1-2124958450
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2008 Mar;62(3):239-4418272739
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011 Aug;43(8):1575-8121681120
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2001 Aug;55(8):562-811449013
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2012 Jun;37(3):540-222540258
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2016 Mar 15;:null26979986
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2015 Feb;127:171-8025113566
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2008 Feb;32(2):353-6117653065
Cites: Prev Med. 1997 Jul-Aug;26(4):570-99245681
Cites: Science. 2013 Jun 21;340(6139):1467-7123722424
Cites: Prev Med. 2011 Jul-Aug;53(1-2):24-821371494
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2015 Feb;127:63-7325113567
Cites: JAMA. 1998 Feb 11;279(6):440-49466636
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1998 Oct;22(10):949-579806309
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2014 Jun;48(12):947-5124859181
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2012 Sep 19;9:11622992350
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2005 Oct;34(5):1089-9916087687
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2005 Feb 15;161(4):389-9815692083
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 Oct;38(10):1716-2317019292
Cites: Econ Educ Rev. 2013 Aug 1;35:null24415826
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2014 Feb;48(3):171-323134760
Cites: Biomed Res Int. 2014;2014:20914024822182
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011 Jan;43(1):74-920473224
Cites: Lancet. 2012 Jul 21;380(9838):258-7122818938
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2013 Jun;103(6):997-100123597373
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2010 Mar;38(2):121-820064919
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1988;41(2):139-503335880
Cites: Mol Psychiatry. 2015 Feb;20(1):98-10825224258
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011 Jul;43(7):1229-3421131860
PubMed ID
27492437 View in PubMed
Less detail

Body fat and mobility are explained by common genetic and environmental influences in older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157662
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jul;16(7):1616-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Alfredo Ortega-Alonso
Sarianna Sipilä
Urho M Kujala
Jaakko Kaprio
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. alfredo.ortega@sport.jyu.fi
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jul;16(7):1616-21
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adiposity - genetics
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - genetics
Electric Impedance
Environment
Female
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Locomotion - genetics
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Models, Genetic
Obesity - genetics - physiopathology
Physical Endurance - genetics
Risk factors
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Walking
Abstract
In older adults, mobility limitations often coexist with overweight or obesity, suggesting that similar factors may underlie both traits. This study examined the extent to which genetic and environmental influences explain the association between adiposity and mobility in older women. Body fat percentage (bioimpedance test), walking speed over 10 m, and distance walked in a 6-min test were evaluated in 92 monozygotic (MZ) and 104 dizygotic (DZ) pairs of twin sisters reared together, aged 63-76 years. Genetic and environmental influences on each trait were estimated using age-adjusted multivariate genetic modeling. The analyses showed that the means (and s.d.) for body fat percentage, walking speed, and walking endurance were 33.2+/-7.3%, 1.7+/-0.3 m/s and 529.7+/-75.4 m, respectively. The phenotypic correlation between adiposity and walking speed was -0.32 and between adiposity and endurance it was -0.33. Genetic influences explained 80% of the association between adiposity and speed, and 65% of adiposity and walking endurance. Cross-trait genetic influences accounted for 12% of the variability in adiposity, 56% in walking speed, and 34% in endurance. Trait-specific genetic influences were also detected for adiposity (54%) and walking endurance (13%), but not speed. In conclusion, among community-living older women, an inverse association was found between adiposity and mobility that was mostly due to the effect of shared genes. This result suggests that the identification of genetic variants for body fat metabolism may also provide understanding of the development of mobility limitations in older women.
PubMed ID
18421266 View in PubMed
Less detail

Differences in muscle and adipose tissue gene expression and cardio-metabolic risk factors in the members of physical activity discordant twin pairs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140570
Source
PLoS One. 2010;5(9)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Tuija Leskinen
Rita Rinnankoski-Tuikka
Mirva Rintala
Tuulikki Seppänen-Laakso
Eija Pöllänen
Markku Alen
Sarianna Sipilä
Jaakko Kaprio
Vuokko Kovanen
Paavo Rahkila
Matej Oresic
Heikki Kainulainen
Urho M Kujala
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
PLoS One. 2010;5(9)
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Aged
Cholesterol, HDL - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Energy Metabolism
Female
Finland
Gene Expression Regulation
Heart Diseases - epidemiology - genetics - metabolism - physiopathology
Humans
Lipid Metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Muscle, Skeletal - metabolism
Risk factors
Twins - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
High physical activity/aerobic fitness predicts low morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to identify the most up-regulated gene sets related to long-term physical activity vs. inactivity in skeletal muscle and adipose tissues and to obtain further information about their link with cardio-metabolic risk factors. We studied ten same-sex twin pairs (age range 50-74 years) who had been discordant for leisure-time physical activity for 30 years. The examinations included biopsies from m. vastus lateralis and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue. RNA was analyzed with the genome-wide Illumina Human WG-6 v3.0 Expression BeadChip. For pathway analysis we used Gene Set Enrichment Analysis utilizing active vs. inactive co-twin gene expression ratios. Our findings showed that among the physically active members of twin pairs, as compared to their inactive co-twins, gene expression in the muscle tissue samples was chronically up-regulated for the central pathways related to energy metabolism, including oxidative phosphorylation, lipid metabolism and supportive metabolic pathways. Up-regulation of these pathways was associated in particular with aerobic fitness and high HDL cholesterol levels. In fat tissue we found physical activity-associated increases in the expression of polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism and branched-chain amino acid degradation gene sets both of which associated with decreased 'high-risk' ectopic body fat and plasma glucose levels. Consistent with other findings, plasma lipidomics analysis showed up-regulation of the triacylglycerols containing the polyunsaturated fatty acids. Our findings identified skeletal muscle and fat tissue pathways which are associated with the long-term physical activity and reduced cardio-metabolic disease risk, including increased aerobic fitness. In particular, improved skeletal muscle oxidative energy and lipid metabolism as well as changes in adipocyte function and redistribution of body fat are associated with reduced cardio-metabolic risk.
Notes
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Oct 25;102(43):15545-5016199517
Cites: Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Jul;295(1):E148-5418460597
Cites: J Nutr Biochem. 2006 Jun;17(6):374-816644198
Cites: PLoS One. 2006;1:e9717183729
Cites: Acta Physiol (Oxf). 2008 Jan;192(1):127-3518171435
Cites: Rejuvenation Res. 2007 Dec;10(4):485-50017985945
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2008 Feb;32(2):353-6117653065
Cites: Nature. 2008 Mar 27;452(7186):423-818344981
Cites: PLoS Med. 2008 Mar 11;5(3):e5118336063
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Jan;89(1):453S-4S19056554
Cites: Twin Res Hum Genet. 2009 Feb;12(1):108-1719210186
Cites: Diabetologia. 2009 Apr;52(4):684-9019214471
Cites: Cell Metab. 2009 Apr;9(4):311-2619356713
Cites: JAMA. 2009 May 20;301(19):2024-3519454641
Cites: Steroids. 2009 Oct;74(10-11):814-819447125
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2009 Aug;24(8):1427-3319335223
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2009 Aug;43(8):550-519406731
Cites: Nature. 2009 Sep 10;461(7261):218-2319741703
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Nov;33(11):1211-819721451
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009 Dec;17 Suppl 3:S27-3319927142
Cites: Biochim Biophys Acta. 2010 Mar;1801(3):281-819958841
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2011 May;14(5):846-5220441664
Cites: Biometrics. 2000 Jun;56(2):645-610877330
Cites: J Appl Physiol (1985). 2001 Mar;90(3):1137-5711181630
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2001 Jun;33(6 Suppl):S502-15; discussion S528-911427777
Cites: Nat Med. 2001 Jul;7(7):853-711433352
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Mar 14;346(11):793-80111893790
Cites: Sports Med. 2003;33(8):553-6112797837
Cites: Nat Genet. 2003 Jul;34(3):267-7312808457
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2004 Feb 12;20(3):307-1514960456
Cites: J Biol Chem. 1967 May 10;242(9):2278-824290225
Cites: J Physiol. 1983 May;338:1-96224003
Cites: JAMA. 1998 Feb 11;279(6):440-49466636
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2004 Dec;28 Suppl 4:S12-2115592481
Cites: Science. 2005 Jan 21;307(5708):418-2015662013
Cites: IUBMB Life. 2008 Mar;60(3):145-5318380005
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2006 Mar 1;22(5):634-616403790
PubMed ID
20862330 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dyspnea and all-cause mortality: 28-yr follow-up study among adult twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260871
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2014 Aug;46(8):1538-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Katja Waller
Jaakko Kaprio
Urho M Kujala
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2014 Aug;46(8):1538-45
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cause of Death
Dyspnea - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Physical Fitness
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Abstract
Dyspnea has not been widely used as a proxy measure of fitness. Because dyspnea score is simple to obtain, it could be a screening tool for identifying individuals with low fitness and increased mortality risk. The aim was to study how baseline dyspnea, and changes in it, predicts all-cause mortality.
The prospective Finnish Twin Cohort includes all same-sex twin pairs born in Finland before 1958. Dyspnea was measured with a four-question modified Medical Research Council scale. The level and change in dyspnea between 1975 and 1981 were used as the baseline predictors. Altogether, 21,379 twin individuals (8672 complete twin pairs) had answered dyspnea questions in 1975 and 1981. Cox proportional hazards model was used for mortality analysis starting from the 1981 response date until December 31, 2010.
Increased mortality was observed among individuals with persistent dyspnea (dyspnea in 1975 and 1981); full covariate adjusted HR of death was 1.41 (95% confidence interval, 1.31-1.52), whereas the HR for dyspnea developers and those with dyspnea remission were 1.16 (1.05-1.25) and 1.07 (0.97-1.19), respectively, compared with asymptomatic individuals. Among healthy subjects at 1981 baseline, the corresponding HR values were 1.34 (1.16-1.54), 1.15 (0.97-1.37), and 1.05 (0.89-1.23). Within-pair analyses of death discordant pairs showed a fully adjusted HR for persistent dyspnea of 1.47 (1.23-1.77) for all twin pairs and 2.64 (1.21-5.74) for healthy monozygotic pairs.
Persistent dyspnea predicts increased mortality during a 28-yr follow-up even among individuals without clinically overt disease known to associate with dyspnea. The dyspnea score, which can be easily obtained and correlates with fitness outcomes, could be a screening tool for identifying unfit individuals at an increased mortality risk.
PubMed ID
24500534 View in PubMed
Less detail

The effect of a movement-to-music video program on the objectively measured sedentary time and physical activity of preschool-aged children and their mothers: A randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286506
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(8):e0183317
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Pipsa P A Tuominen
Pauliina Husu
Jani Raitanen
Urho M Kujala
Riitta M Luoto
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(8):e0183317
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Exercise - physiology
Female
Finland
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Maternal-Fetal Relations - physiology
Mothers
Music
Sedentary lifestyle
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Regular physical activity (PA) and the avoidance of prolonged sitting are essential for children's healthy growth, and for the physical and mental wellbeing of both children and adults. In the context of exercise, music may promote behavioral change through increased exercise adherence and participation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a movement-to-music video program could reduce sedentary behavior (SB) and increase PA in mother-child pairs in the home environment. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in the Pirkanmaa region, Finland, in 2014-2016. The participants consisted of 228 mother-child pairs (child age 5-7 years). The primary outcomes of interest were tri-axial accelerometer-derived SB and PA, which were measured in weeks one (baseline), two, and eight in both the intervention and control groups. Further, the mothers and children in the intervention group used a movement-to-music video program from the beginning of week two to the end of week eight. Secondary outcomes included self-reported screen time. The statistical methods employed comprised an intention-to-treat and linear mixed effects model design. No statistically significant differences between groups were found in primary or secondary outcomes. Among the children in the control group, light PA decreased significantly over time and screen time increased from 89 (standard deviation, SD 37) to 99 (SD 41) min/d. Among mothers and children in the intervention group, no statistical differences were found. In supplementary analysis, the children who stayed at home instead of attending daycare/preschool had on average 25 (95% confidence interval, CI 19-30) min/d more sedentary time and 11 (95% CI 8-14) min/d less moderate-to-vigorous PA than those who were at daycare/preschool. The higher body mass index of mothers was related with 5 (95% CI 2-7) min/d more sedentary time and 1 (95% CI 0-2) min/d less moderate-to-vigorous PA. The movement-to-music video program did not change the objectively measured SB or PA of the mother-child pairs. However, mothers and children seemed to be more sedentary at home, and therefore interventions for decreasing SB and increasing PA should be targeted in the home environment.
Notes
Cites: Coll Antropol. 2013 May;37 Suppl 2:125-3023914499
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2016 Sep 01;16:92027586887
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2014 Oct;47(4):487-9725084681
Cites: Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2015 Jan;35(1):64-7024393233
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2016 Aug 05;16:73627496020
Cites: J Sports Sci Med. 2009 Sep 01;8(3):435-4224150008
Cites: PLoS One. 2013 Aug 07;8(8):e7075823951000
Cites: J Strength Cond Res. 2012 Jul;26(7):1934-822033366
Cites: Int Rev Sport Exerc Psychol. 2012 Mar;5(1):44-6622577472
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2015 Oct 05;15:101626438056
Cites: Int Rev Sport Exerc Psychol. 2012 Mar;5(1):67-8422577473
Cites: Indian J Physiol Pharmacol. 2010 Jan-Mar;54(1):32-621046917
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 Aug 20;10(8):e013481326292225
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2010 Mar;42(3):526-3420068495
Cites: J Obes. 2015;2015:54692525874123
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2010 Aug;63(8):e1-3720346624
Cites: J Sch Health. 2013 May;83(5):322-723516999
Cites: J Pediatr. 2016 Mar;170:206-1026725460
Cites: BMC Med. 2010 Mar 24;8:1820334633
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2012 Jun;37(3):540-222540258
Cites: Springerplus. 2016 Jan 28;5:9326848433
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Sep;16(9):2074-8019186332
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2012 Apr;37(2):345-6922448608
Cites: Pediatr Phys Ther. 2009 Fall;21(3):245-5319680066
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2012 Oct 01;9:11723025568
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2012 Dec 18;9:14923249449
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010 Jul;164(7):664-7220603468
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2014 Apr 23;11:5424758143
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2010 May 11;7:4020459784
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2012 Aug;37(4):753-7222765839
Cites: BMC Sports Sci Med Rehabil. 2015 Aug 07;7:1826251724
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2004 Sep;59(6):1297-30615210100
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2010 Apr 15;10 :19420398306
Cites: J Phys Act Health. 2016 Mar;13(3):269-7426181513
Cites: J Phys Act Health. 2016 Nov;13(11 Suppl 2):S157-S16427848744
Cites: PLoS One. 2014 Aug 21;9(8):e10562025144686
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2016 Feb 06;16:12426851940
Cites: J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2012 Aug;52(4):359-6522828457
Cites: Int J Sports Med. 2004 Nov;25(8):611-515532005
Cites: Paediatr Child Health. 2012 Mar;17(3):e20-423450045
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2010 Dec;35(6):725-4021164543
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2016 Apr 16;16:33827083559
Cites: Eur J Pediatr. 2013 Nov;172(11):1543-523812514
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011 Sep 21;8:9821936895
PubMed ID
28859091 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of physical activity on health in twins: a 30-yr longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147032
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2010 Apr;42(4):658-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Katja Waller
Urho M Kujala
Jaakko Kaprio
Markku Koskenvuo
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. katja.waller@jyu.fi
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2010 Apr;42(4):658-64
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Chronic Disease
Exercise
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate whether persistent leisure-time physical activity, adjusted for genetic liability and childhood experiences, protects against chronic diseases, early signs of disability, and loss of life satisfaction.
From 5663 healthy adult twin pairs, we identified 146 pairs who were discordant for both intensity and volume of leisure physical activity in 1975 and 1981. Of them, both members of 95 pairs were alive and participated in our follow-up study in 2005 when chronic diseases (such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and osteoarthritis), life satisfaction, and disability were assessed by a structured telephone interview. The mean age of the participants was 58 yr (range = 47-79 yr) in 2005. Paired tests were used in the analyses.
At the end of follow-up, the active cotwins had a decreased risk of reporting at least one chronic diseases, whereas active monozygotic (MZ) twins had two or more chronic diseases significantly less often than their inactive cotwins (odds ratio [OR] = 0.14, P = 0.031). Overall, the risk for type 2 diabetes or glucose intolerance (OR = 0.09, P = 0.022) and elevated blood pressure (OR = 0.46, P = 0.039) was decreased among the active cotwins. These effects were seen clearly among dizygotic twins but not always among small number of monozygotic twins. The active cotwins reported greater life satisfaction (P = 0.047) and tended to be less likely to be hospitalized (P = 0.065), although active cotwins had somewhat more sports-related injuries (OR = 1.9, P = 0.051) than inactive cotwins. Studied disability variables did not differ between the active and the inactive cotwins.
Physical activity reduces the risk for chronic diseases and helps in maintaining life satisfaction. However, genetic factors may play a role in this association because some findings emerged more clearly among dizygotic than monozygotic twins discordant for physical activity.
PubMed ID
19952836 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of a progressive aquatic resistance exercise program on the biochemical composition and morphology of cartilage in women with mild knee osteoarthritis: protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115536
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2013;14:82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Benjamin Waller
Matti Munukka
Juhani Multanen
Timo Rantalainen
Tapani Pöyhönen
Miika T Nieminen
Ilkka Kiviranta
Hannu Kautiainen
Harri Selänne
Joost Dekker
Sarianna Sipilä
Urho M Kujala
Arja Häkkinen
Ari Heinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. ben.waller@jyu.fi
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2013;14:82
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Aged
Biomechanical Phenomena
Body Composition
Cartilage, Articular - metabolism - pathology - physiopathology
Contrast Media - diagnostic use
Female
Finland
Humans
Immersion
Knee Joint - metabolism - pathology - physiopathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Knee - diagnosis - metabolism - pathology - physiopathology - therapy
Pain Measurement
Physical Examination
Postmenopause
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Research Design
Resistance Training - methods
Severity of Illness Index
Swimming Pools
Time Factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Symptoms associated with osteoarthritis of the knee result in decreased function, loss of working capacity and extensive social and medical costs. There is a need to investigate and develop effective interventions to minimise the impact of and even prevent the progression of osteoarthritis. Aquatic exercise has been shown to be effective at reducing the impact of osteoarthritis. The purpose of this article is to describe the rationale, design and intervention of a study investigating the effect of an aquatic resistance exercise intervention on cartilage in postmenopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis.
A minimum of 80 volunteers who meet the inclusion criteria will be recruited from the local population through newspaper advertisements. Following initial assessment volunteers will be randomised into two groups. The intervention group will participate in a progressive aquatic resistance exercise program of 1-hour duration 3 times a week for four months. The control group will be asked to maintain normal care during this period. Primary outcome measure for this study is the biochemical composition of knee cartilage measured using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging; T2 relaxation time and delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques. In addition, knee cartilage morphology as regional cartilage thickness will be studied. Secondary outcomes include measures of body composition and bone traits using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and peripheral quantitative computed tomography, pain, function using questionnaires and physical performance tests and quality of life. Measurements will be performed at baseline, after the 4-month intervention period and at one year follow up.
This randomised controlled trial will investigate the effect a progressive aquatic resistance exercise program has on the biochemical composition of cartilage in post-menopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis. This is the first study to investigate what impact aquatic exercise has on human articular cartilage. In addition it will investigate the effect aquatic exercise has on physical function, pain, bone and body composition and quality of life. The results of this study will help optimise the prescription of aquatic exercise to persons with mild knee osteoarthritis.
ISRCTN65346593.
Notes
Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2008;9:9518582362
Cites: Bone. 2012 Aug;51(2):249-5722387238
Cites: BMJ. 2012;345:e493422846469
Cites: J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact. 2012 Sep;12(3):127-3522947544
Cites: Curr Rheumatol Rep. 2000 Feb;2(1):62-611123041
Cites: Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon). 2001 Jul;16(6):496-50411427292
Cites: Magn Reson Med. 2001 Sep;46(3):487-9311550240
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2001 Oct;82(10):1446-5211588752
Cites: J Strength Cond Res. 2001 Aug;15(3):337-4011710661
Cites: Magn Reson Med. 2001 Dec;46(6):1067-7111746570
Cites: Invest Radiol. 2001 Dec;36(12):743-811753146
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2002 May;10(5):408-1912027542
Cites: Magn Reson Med. 2002 Oct;48(4):640-812353281
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2002 Dec;34(12):2103-912471323
Cites: Gait Posture. 2003 Feb;17(1):68-7412535728
Cites: Magn Reson Med. 2003 Mar;49(3):488-9212594751
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2003;85-A Suppl 2:70-712721347
Cites: Bone. 2003 Jul;33(1):132-4312919708
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2003 Sep;14 Suppl 5:S81-814504711
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2003 Dec;62(12):1162-714644853
Cites: Aging Clin Exp Res. 2003 Oct;15(5):426-3914703009
Cites: Magn Reson Med. 2004 Feb;51(2):286-9014755653
Cites: Gerontology. 2004 Mar-Apr;50(2):87-9514963375
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2004 Mar;50(3):811-615022323
Cites: Clin J Pain. 2004 May-Jun;20(3):179-8515100594
Cites: J Orthop Res. 2004 May;22(3):557-6415099635
Cites: Magn Reson Imaging. 2004 Jun;22(5):673-8215172061
Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2004 May 17;5:1315147583
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2004 Sep;50(9):2820-815457450
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1982;14(5):377-817154893
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 1986 Mar-Apr;14(2):156-93717488
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1987 Aug;30(8):914-83632732
Cites: J Orthop Res. 1988;6(2):188-953278079
Cites: J Rheumatol. 1988 Dec;15(12):1833-403068365
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1989 Oct;32(10):1282-922508643
Cites: Invest Radiol. 1990 Jan;25(1):6-182298552
Cites: Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1990;60(5):385-902369911
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1992 Apr;16(4):263-81318280
Cites: Scand J Soc Med. 1992 Jun;20(2):119-261496331
Cites: Br J Rheumatol. 1993 Sep;32(9):812-58369892
Cites: Health Econ. 1993 Oct;2(3):217-278275167
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 1994 Jul;9(7):1053-647942152
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 1994 Nov;4(6):368-817696835
Cites: Acta Physiol Scand. 1996 Apr;156(4):457-648732251
Cites: Radiology. 1997 Nov;205(2):551-89356644
Cites: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 1998 Aug;8(4):236-429764446
Cites: Phys Ther. 2007 Jan;87(1):32-4317142642
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2007 Jan;57(2):141-5217214750
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2007 Jan;34(1):172-8017216685
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2007 Apr;18(4):453-6217103296
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2007 Apr;15(4):372-817110135
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2007 Apr 15;57(3):407-1417443749
Cites: Invest Radiol. 2007 Jun;42(6):442-817507817
Cites: Rheumatology (Oxford). 2007 Jul;46(7):1057-6217500072
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2007 Sep;15(9):981-100017719803
Cites: J Magn Reson Imaging. 2007 Oct;26(4):974-8217896385
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2007;(4):CD00552317943863
Cites: Phys Ther. 2008 Jan;88(1):12-2117986497
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2008 Jan;58(1):26-3518163497
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2008 Feb;16(2):137-6218279766
Cites: Bone. 2008 Mar;42(3):467-7518180210
Cites: J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2008 Feb;63(2):171-818314453
Cites: Radiology. 2008 Apr;247(1):154-6118372466
Cites: Eur Radiol. 2008 Jun;18(6):1251-918246356
Cites: J Rehabil Med. 2008 Feb;40(2):137-4418509579
Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2011;12:12321635746
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011 Aug;43(8):1575-8121681120
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2004 Jun;50(6):1815-2115188358
Cites: Radiology. 2004 Aug;232(2):592-815215540
Cites: J Magn Reson Imaging. 2012 Dec;36(6):1287-9923165732
Cites: J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2008 Sep;48(3):352-918974722
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2008 Dec;89(12):2360-519061748
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2009 Mar;90(3):388-9419254601
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2009 May;17(5):559-6419121954
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;(3):CD00791219588445
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2009 Aug 15;61(8):1095-10219644895
Cites: Invest Radiol. 2009 Sep;44(9):603-1219692843
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2009 Nov;17(11):1434-919454278
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2009 Dec;17(12):1570-519501682
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2010 Feb;69(2):325-3119773290
Cites: Bone. 2010 May;46(5):1286-9319857618
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2010 Jun;91(6):833-920510971
Cites: Eur J Appl Physiol. 2010 Jul;109(4):651-820195627
Cites: Cells Tissues Organs. 2010;192(1):64-7220185897
Cites: J Aging Phys Act. 2010 Jul;18(3):245-6020651413
Cites: PM R. 2010 Aug;2(8):723-31; quiz 79320709301
Cites: Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2010 Nov;18(11):1545-5020505925
Cites: Bone. 2010 Dec;47(6):1076-920817052
Cites: J Sci Med Sport. 2011 Jan;14(1):4-920851051
Cites: PM R. 2011 Feb;3(2):153-62; quiz 16221333954
Cites: Bone. 2011 Apr 1;48(4):786-9121122824
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2011 Apr;19(4):381-821251988
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2011 May;19(5):557-8821396463
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2011 May;19(5):589-60521396465
Cites: J Clin Nurs. 2011 Sep;20(17-18):2609-2221539629
Cites: J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact. 2011 Sep;11(3):243-821885899
Cites: Acta Reumatol Port. 2011 Jul-Sep;36(3):268-8122113602
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2012 Dec;23 Suppl 8:S847-5123179567
Cites: Eur Radiol. 2013 Feb;23(2):496-50422886535
Cites: Gait Posture. 2000 Oct;12(2):134-810998610
Cites: Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon). 2000 May;15(4):256-6010675666
Cites: Int J Sports Med. 2000 Jan;21(1):76-8110683104
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2000 Sep;32(9 Suppl):S498-50410993420
Cites: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 1998 Dec;8(6):439-489863983
Cites: Magn Reson Med. 1999 May;41(5):857-6510332865
Cites: J Orthop Res. 1999 May;17(3):430-610376734
Cites: Scand J Rheumatol. 1999;28(4):210-510503556
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 1957 Dec;16(4):494-50213498604
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2005 Jan;52(1):120-715641092
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 2005 Mar;33(3):408-1415716257
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2005 May;64(5):669-8115471891
Cites: Health Technol Assess. 2005 Aug;9(31):iii-iv, ix-xi, 1-11416095546
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2005 Sep;86(9):1838-4216181951
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2005 Nov;52(11):3507-1416258919
Cites: J Rehabil Med. 2006 Jul;38(4):224-916801204
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2006 Aug 15;55(4):610-516874784
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2006 Oct 15;55(5):779-8517013827
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2006 Nov;33(11):2271-917013996
Cites: Rheumatology (Oxford). 2011 Dec;50(12):2157-6521954151
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2011 Dec;92(12):1944-5022133241
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2012 Jan;93(1):27-3421982325
Cites: Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2012 Jan;64(1):38-4522213723
Cites: Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2012 Feb;64(2):248-5522012846
Cites: Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2012 Apr;64(4):465-7422563589
Cites: PM R. 2012 May;4(5 Suppl):S10-922632687
Cites: PM R. 2012 May;4(5 Suppl):S45-5222632702
Cites: PM R. 2012 May;4(5 Suppl):S59-6722632704
Cites: J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2012 Jun;42(6):511-2022402583
Cites: Bone. 2012 Aug;51(2):204-1122023932
PubMed ID
23497162 View in PubMed
Less detail

47 records – page 1 of 5.