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Community-dwelling older people with an injurious fall are likely to sustain new injurious falls within 5 years--a prospective long-term follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264015
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2014;14:120
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Petra Pohl
Ellinor Nordin
Anders Lundquist
Ulrica Bergström
Lillemor Lundin-Olsson
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2014;14:120
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Incidence
Independent living
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Fall-related injuries in older people are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Self-reported fall events in the last year is often used to estimate fall risk in older people. However, it remains to be investigated if the fall frequency and the consequences of the falls have an impact on the risk for subsequent injurious falls in the long term. The objective of this study was to investigate if a history of one single non-injurious fall, at least two non-injurious falls, or at least one injurious fall within 12 months increases the risk of sustaining future injurious falls.
Community-dwelling individuals 75-93 years of age (n = 230) were initially followed prospectively with monthly calendars reporting falls over a period of 12 months. The participants were classified into four groups based on the number and type of falls (0, 1, =2 non-injurious falls, and =1 injurious fall severe enough to cause a visit to a hospital emergency department). The participants were then followed for several years (mean time 5.0 years ±1.1) regarding injurious falls requiring a visit to the emergency department. The Andersen-Gill method of Cox regression for multiple events was used to estimate the risk of injurious falls.
During the long-term follow-up period, thirty per cent of the participants suffered from at least one injurious fall. Those with a self-reported history of at least one injurious fall during the initial 12 months follow-up period showed a significantly higher risk for sustaining subsequent injurious falls in the long term (hazard ratio 2.78; 95% CI, 1.40-5.50) compared to those with no falls. No other group showed an increased risk.
In community-dwelling people over 75 years of age, a history of at least one self-reported injurious fall severe enough to cause a visit to the emergency department within a period of 12 months implies an increased risk of sustaining future injurious falls. Our results support the recommendations to offer a multifactorial fall-risk assessment coupled with adequate interventions to community-dwelling people over 75 years who present to the ED due to an injurious fall.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25407714 View in PubMed
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Epidemiologic patterns of injuries treated at the emergency department of a Swedish medical center.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277141
Source
Inj Epidemiol. 2015 Dec;2(1):3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Fredrik Röding
Marie Lindkvist
Ulrica Bergström
Jack Lysholm
Source
Inj Epidemiol. 2015 Dec;2(1):3
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The injury spectrum published in the literature has mainly been presented for a certain age group, as elderly or for a certain type of injury, as fracture and often restricted to in-hospital care cases. Our objective was to give an overview of the major types of injuries for all age groups and trends in the adult population.
We analyzed 68,159 adult injury events, which occurred between 1999 and 2008 and was treated at the Emergency Department of Umea University Hospital. All these injuries are registered in a database. The injuries were analyzed depending on frequency, type of injury, and activity at the time of injury. Incidence rates were calculated using population data from Statistics Sweden.
Injury event incidence varied between 614 (2004) and 669 (2007) per 10,000 persons. The most common injury was a fracture, although contusions and wounds were also frequent. Fractures were responsible for almost three quarters of hospital days related to injury. The risk for fractures increased with age, as did contusions and concussions, whereas sprains decreased with age. Fracture incidence increased among the 50- to 59-year age group for both women and men. Fall-related injuries increased significantly for middle-aged adults. Sports-related and work injuries decreased, while injuries occurring during leisure time increased the most.
A fracture is the most frequent type of injury for adults and accounts for the largest proportion of the trauma care burden. Contusions are also common and responsible for a significant proportion of the in-hospital days. Injuries caused by a fall increased among middle-age adults imply a need for an extension of fall prevention programs.
PubMed ID
27747735 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of acute knee injuries seen at the Emergency Department at Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, during 15 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259214
Source
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2014 May;22(5):1149-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Tomas Ferry
Ulrica Bergström
Erik M Hedström
Ronny Lorentzon
Eva Zeisig
Source
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2014 May;22(5):1149-55
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Athletic Injuries - embryology
Child, Preschool
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitals, University - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Knee Injuries - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe the incidence and injury distribution of knee injuries in the general population of a European setting.
Retrospective study of all knee injuries registered at the Emergency Department at Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, during 1995-2009 in relation to age, sex, diagnosis, location and activity at the time of injury, mechanism of injury, and treatment and/or follow-up plan.
During 1995-2009, 12,663 knee injuries were registered, 8% of all injuries. The incidence of knee injuries resulting in a visit to the Emergency Department was six cases per 1,000 person years. One-third of all injuries occurred during sports. And 30% were 15-24 years. More men than women were injured during sporting activities and women were mostly injured during transportation.
Knee injuries in a general population are common and the injury distribution varies with age and sex. Sports activities and young age were prominent features of the injured population.
IV.
PubMed ID
23740325 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of fractures in children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97948
Source
Acta Orthop. 2010 Feb;81(1):148-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Erik M Hedström
Olle Svensson
Ulrica Bergström
Piotr Michno
Author Affiliation
Division of Surgery and Perioperative Science, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. erik.hedstrom@orthop.umu.se
Source
Acta Orthop. 2010 Feb;81(1):148-53
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Fractures are most common in youth and in the elderly, with differences in incidence over time and between regions. We present the fracture pattern in a population of youths
PubMed ID
20175744 View in PubMed
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Injuries in children and adolescents--analysis of 41,330 injury related visits to an emergency department in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136131
Source
Injury. 2012 Sep;43(9):1403-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Erik M Hedström
Ulrica Bergström
Piotr Michno
Author Affiliation
Division of Surgery and Perioperative Science, Umeå University Hospital, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden. erik.hedstrom@orthop.umu.se
Source
Injury. 2012 Sep;43(9):1403-8
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Poisoning - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Trauma Severity Indices
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
We present an overview of the injuries seen at the emergency department of a regional hospital in northern Sweden and the variations in the injury pattern with age, sex and time.
Data consisting of all injuries sustained by those 0-19 years of age seen at the emergency department of Umeå University Hospital between 1998 and 2008 (41,330 injury events) were analysed with respect to injury type, mechanism, activity, age and sex. Rates were calculated using population data from Statistics Sweden.
The rate of injury related visits to the emergency department was 110/1000 person years. The most common causes of visits to the emergency department were minor injuries such as contusions, abrasions and open wounds. 12% of the injuries resulted in admission to a ward. Variations in type of injury, mechanism and activity at injury were noted, in particular with age, but also with sex. We noted a 31% rate increase of visits to the hospital's emergency department between 1998 and 2008, rate ratio 1.31 (1.27-1.38). There was no significant increase in the rate of injuries resulting in hospitalisation.
Our results give an estimate of the rate of all injuries and subsets of injuries resulting in visits to the only hospital emergency department within a well defined catchment area. It was not possible to determine whether the increased rate of visits to the ED was due to an increase in the actual rate of injuries within the catchment area. The variations seen in different age groups reflect the hazards associated with different periods in growth and the ability to cope with these. The results point to areas where improved preventive measures may be implemented or where further research may be of value.
PubMed ID
21411086 View in PubMed
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Trauma recidivism at an emergency department of a Swedish medical center.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277142
Source
Inj Epidemiol. 2016 Dec;3(1):22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Fredrik Röding
Marie Lindkvist
Ulrica Bergström
Olle Svensson
Jack Lysholm
Source
Inj Epidemiol. 2016 Dec;3(1):22
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
To inform targeted prevention, we studied patterns of trauma recidivism and whether a first injury predicts the risk for a recurrent injury.
In a population-based study of 98,502 adult injury events 1999-2012, at the emergency department of Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, we compared non-recidivists with recidivists in terms of patients' sex, age, type of injury and severity of the injury.
Thirty-six percent of all patients suffered recurrent injuries, which were associated with a higher proportion of inpatient care and more hospital days. Young men and elderly women were at the highest risk for trauma recidivism. At 20 to 24 years, men had a 2.4 (CI 95 % 2.3-2.5) higher risk than women, a 90 years old woman had almost a 10-fold higher risk for another moderate/severe injury than a 20 years old one. A fracture were associated with a hazard ratio of 1.28 (CI 95 % 1.15-1.42) among men younger than 65 years and 1.31 (CI 95 % 1.12-1.54) for men older than 65 years for a subsequent moderate/severe injury. For women younger than 65 years a fracture was associated with a hazard ratio of 1.44 (CI 95 % 1.28-1.62) for a subsequent moderate/severe injury. A sprain carries a higher risk for a new moderate/severe injury for both men and women and in both age groups; the hazard ratio was 1.13 (CI 95 % 1.00-1.26) for men younger than 65 years, 1.42 (CI 95 % 1.01-1.99) for men older than 65 years, 1.19 (CI 95 % 1.05-1.35) for women younger than 65 years and 1.26 (CI 95 % 1.02-1.56) for women older than 65 years. A higher degree of injury severity was associated with a higher risk for a new moderate/severe injury.
Trauma recidivism is common and represents a large proportion of all injured. Age and sex are associated with the risk for new injury. Injury types and severity, also have implications for future injury.
PubMed ID
27747558 View in PubMed
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The trend of radiological severity of hip fractures over a 30?years period: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310150
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2019 Aug 07; 20(1):358
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-07-2019
Author
Mehdy Farhang
Sebastian Mukka
Ulrica Bergström
Olle Svensson
Arkan S Sayed-Noor
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, 90187, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2019 Aug 07; 20(1):358
Date
Aug-07-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Female
Femur Neck - diagnostic imaging - injuries
Fracture Dislocation - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology
Hip Fractures - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Trauma Severity Indices
Abstract
Despite advances in operative techniques and preoperative care, proximal femur fractures (PFF) still represent a great public health problem. Displacement and fracture stability have been assumed as important determinants of treatment modality and outcome in such fractures. Purpose of this study was to determine whether the radiological severity of PFF fractures has increased over time.
In a cohort study, the plain radiographs of all patients with PFF aged over 50?years who were admitted to Umeå University Hospital in 1981/82, 2002 and 2012 were recruited to examine the types of fractures.
The ratio of undisplaced to displaced femoral neck (FN) fractures was 30 to 70% in 1981/82, 28 to 72% in 2002 and 25 to 75% in 2012. The ratio of stable to unstable intertrochanteric (IT) fractures was 64 to 36% in 1981/82, 68 to 32% in 2002 and 75 to 25% in 2012. The ratio of simple to comminute subtrochanteric fractures was 35 to 65% in 1981/82, 16 to 84% in 2002 and 12 to 88% in 2012. In both FN and IT fractures we found no statistical difference among these 3 study periods, p?=?0.67 and p?=?0.40. In subtrochanteric fractures we saw a tendency towards more comminute subtrochanteric fractures (1981/82 to 2012), p?=?0.09.
We found no significant increment in the radiological severity of FN and IT over a 30?years' period. However, there was tendency towards an increase in comminute subtrochanteric fractures.
PubMed ID
31391031 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.