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Amount and type of alcohol consumption and missing teeth among community-dwelling older adults: findings from the Copenhagen Oral Health Senior study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127155
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2011;71(4):318-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Karen Heegaard
Kirsten Avlund
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Ulla A Hvidtfeldt
Allan Bardow
Morten Grønbaek
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Gerontological Oral Health Research Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. karen.heegaard@mail.tele.dk
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2011;71(4):318-26
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - classification - statistics & numerical data
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Population Surveillance
Sedentary lifestyle
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Class
Temperance - statistics & numerical data
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To study if an association between total weekly intake of alcohol, type-specific weekly alcohol intake, alcoholic beverage preference, and the number of teeth among older people exists.
A cross-sectional study including a total of 783 community-dwelling men and women aged 65-95 years who were interviewed about alcohol drinking habits and underwent a clinical oral and dental examination. Multiple regression analyses were applied for studying the association between total weekly alcohol consumption, beverage-specific alcohol consumption, beverage preference (defined as the highest intake of one beverage type compared with two other types), and the number of remaining teeth (= 20 versus >20 remaining teeth).
The odds ratio (OR) of having a low number of teeth decreased with the total intake of alcohol in women, with ORs for a low number of teeth of 0.40 [95 percent confidence interval (CI) 0.22-0.76] in women drinking 1-14 drinks per week and 0.34 (95 percent CI 0.16-0.74) in women with an intake of more than 14 drinks per week compared with abstainers. Similar relations could also be obtained for type-specific alcohol intake of wine and for wine and spirits preference among women. Men who preferred beer showed a decreased risk for a low number of teeth compared with men with other alcohol preferences.
In this study, alcohol consumption, wine drinking, and wine and spirits preference among women were associated with a higher number of teeth compared with abstainers. Among men, those who preferred beer also had a higher number of teeth.
PubMed ID
22320290 View in PubMed
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Are low Danish fertility rates explained by changes in timing of births?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97766
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Jun;38(4):426-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Ulla A Hvidtfeldt
Mette Gerster
Lisbeth B Knudsen
Niels Keiding
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. u.a.hvidtfeldt@biostat.ku.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Jun;38(4):426-33
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth Rate - trends
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Fertility
Humans
Maternal Age
Parity
Pregnancy
Reproductive Behavior - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
AIMS: The most commonly used indicator of fertility, the period total fertility rate (TFR(p)), tends to underestimate actual fertility when women delay childbearing. The objective of this study was to examine to which extent fluctuations in Danish fertility rates result from changes in timing of births and, thus, whether the conventional TFR(p) is a distorted indicator of fertility quantum. In addition, we investigated whether such changes in timing explained the observed regional differences in the TFR(p) in Denmark. METHODS: The study applied age-, period-, county-, and parity-specific data from the Danish Fertility of Women and Couples Dataset, 1980-2001. We evaluated fluctuations in period fertility rates by the tempo-adjusted TFR(') - a proposed variant of the conventional TFR(p) taking period changes in timing of births into account. Tempo-effects were given by the difference between TFR(p) and TFR(') , and these period measures were compared to actual cohort fertility. RESULTS: Mean age at childbearing increased with more than 3 years over the period 1980-2001 leading to considerable differences between TFR(p) and TFR(' ) . A tempo-effect of up to 0.347 children per woman was observed. Comparisons with actual cohort fertility showed consistency with the TFR('). However, tempo-adjustment did not attenuate observed regional differences. CONCLUSION: This study indicates that the conventional TFR(p) consistently underestimates the fertility quantum in periods characterized by changes in timing of births, and that the TFR(' ) generally provides good indication of actual cohort quantum for the period in question. Considerable tempo-effects were observed within counties; however, differences between regions were not explained by changes in timing of births.
PubMed ID
20215486 View in PubMed
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The Copenhagen Oral Health Senior Cohort: design, population and dental health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138774
Source
Gerodontology. 2011 Sep;28(3):165-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Karen M Heegaard
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Allan Bardow
Ulla A Hvidtfeldt
Morten Grønbaek
Kirsten Avlund
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Gerontological Oral Health Research Centre, School of Dentistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Gerodontology. 2011 Sep;28(3):165-76
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cuspid - pathology
Denmark
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Incisor - pathology
Income - statistics & numerical data
Male
Marital status
Motor Activity
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Oral Health
Polypharmacy
Refusal to Participate - statistics & numerical data
Root Caries - epidemiology
Saliva - secretion
Secretory Rate - physiology
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Tooth Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
In order to study the way old age influence oral health, the Copenhagen Oral Health Senior Cohort (COHS) has been established.
To describe the design, measurement procedures, and baseline values for COHS including spatial distribution of restorations and dental caries as well as reasons for non-participation.
Seven hundred and eighty-three individuals aged 65 years or older, from a total of 1918 invited elderly people, underwent an interview regarding oral health-related behaviour and a clinical oral examination including measurement of unstimulated whole saliva flow rate.
Twelve percent of the COHS was edentulous. The number of dental restorations was higher for women compared to men; however, men had more caries than women. Coronal caries was most frequent on mesial and distal surfaces and on the maxillary incisors and canines; root caries was most frequent on labial surfaces and evenly distributed within the dentition. Only 41% of all invited elderly people accepted the invitation, with old age and poor health being the primary reasons for non-participation.
The baseline values for COHS show that a substantial proportion of the participants had retained a natural dentition and that dental caries was prevalent with the anterior maxillary teeth being most affected.
PubMed ID
21138466 View in PubMed
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Influence of smoking and alcohol consumption on admissions and duration of hospitalization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148261
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2010 Aug;20(4):376-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Ulla A Hvidtfeldt
Søren Rasmussen
Morten Grønbaek
Ulrik Becker
Janne S Tolstrup
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen K, Denmark. u.a.hvidtfeldt@pubhealth.ku.dk
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2010 Aug;20(4):376-82
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Previous studies have linked smoking and alcohol consumption to a considerable disease burden and large healthcare expenditures. However, findings from studies based on individual level data are sparse and inconclusive. Our objective was to assess the association between alcohol consumption, smoking and patterns of hospitalization, defined as admission and duration of hospitalization.
The study was based on 12 698 men and women, aged 20 years or more, enrolled in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. We related smoking and alcohol to hospital admission from any cause, smoking- and alcohol-related diseases and duration of hospitalization in a two-part random effects model.
Smoking status was strongly associated with admission and duration of hospitalization. For smoking-related admissions, odds ratios (OR) of 2.77 (95% CI 2.13-3.59) in men and 6.30 (95% CI 4.80-8.26) in women were observed among smokers of >20 g/day compared to never-smokers. For any admission (excl. smoking-related causes), corresponding ORs were 1.32 (95% CI 1.15-1.51) and 1.80 (95% CI 1.58-2.06), respectively. In men, a U-shaped association between alcohol consumption and risk of admission was found, both regarding any admission and admissions due to alcohol-related diseases. Alcohol was associated with alcohol-related admissions in women but not with duration of hospitalization.
Smoking was associated with increased risk of hospital admission and duration of hospitalization. A U-shaped relation was observed for alcohol consumption and risk of hospitalization in men, but no effect on duration was observed. In women, however, alcohol consumption was only vaguely associated with admission and duration of hospitalization.
PubMed ID
19793836 View in PubMed
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Predictors of Urinary Arsenic Levels among Postmenopausal Danish Women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297598
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 06 26; 15(7):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-26-2018
Author
Nina Roswall
Ulla A Hvidtfeldt
James Harrington
Keith E Levine
Mette Sørensen
Anne Tjønneland
Jaymie R Meliker
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. roswall@cancer.dk.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 06 26; 15(7):
Date
06-26-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Arsenic - urine
Biomarkers - urine
Denmark
Diet
Dietary Exposure
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Female
Fishes
Humans
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Postmenopause - urine
Risk factors
Seafood
Smoking - urine
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Arsenic is a risk factor for several noncommunicable diseases, even at low doses. Urinary arsenic (UAs) concentration is a good biomarker for internal dose, and demographic, dietary, and lifestyle factors are proposed predictors in nonoccupationally exposed populations. However, most predictor studies are limited in terms of size and number of predictors. We investigated demographic, dietary, and lifestyle determinants of UAs concentrations in 744 postmenopausal Danish women who had UAs measurements and questionnaire data on potential predictors. UAs concentrations were determined using mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and determinants of the concentration were investigated using univariate and multivariate regression models. We used a forward selection procedure for model optimization. In all models, fish, alcohol, and poultry intake were associated with higher UAs concentration, and tap water, fruit, potato, and dairy intake with lower concentration. A forward regression model explained 35% (R²) of the variation in concentrations. Age, smoking, education, and area of residence did not predict concentration. The results were relatively robust across sensitivity analyses. The study suggested that UAs concentration in postmenopausal women was primarily determined by dietary factors, with fish consumption showing the strongest direct association. However, the majority of variation in UAs concentration in this study population is still unexplained.
PubMed ID
29949863 View in PubMed
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Quantification of the healthy worker effect: a nationwide cohort study among electricians in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132885
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:571
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Lau C Thygesen
Ulla A Hvidtfeldt
Sigurd Mikkelsen
Henrik Brønnum-Hansen
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. lct@niph.dk
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:571
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bias (epidemiology)
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Electricity
Employment
Facility Design and Construction
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupational Health
Registries
Abstract
The healthy worker effect (HWE) is a well-known phenomenon. In this study we used the extensive registration of all Danish citizens to describe the magnitude of HWE among all Danish electricians and evaluated strategies for minimizing HWE bias of the association between occupation and mortality.
All Danish male citizens aged 26-56 years in the period 1984-1992 were followed for three years in several registers. We evaluated HWE bias among electricians because they were unexposed to detrimental occupational exposures. We compared electricians to three reference groups (general population, construction industry and carpenters/brick layers) and utilized analytical methods for minimizing HWE bias (lag time analyses, age-stratified analyses, marginal structural model and restriction to employed, newly employed or long-term workers).
The mortality rate was higher among electricians, who the year following active employment received incapacity benefits or were on long-term sick leave. Electricians receiving incapacity benefits, on long-term sick leave, unemployed, or with increased comorbidity index had lower odds of re-employment. Electricians had lower mortality rate (rate ratio,0.60;95%CI,0.52-0.69) compared to the general population, while electricians leaving employment had increased mortality (1.90;1.50-2.40). Adjusting for several social events slightly attenuated the estimates, while the marginal structural model did not minimize bias. Electricians had the same mortality as the construction industry and carpenters/brick layers. Mortality was comparable to the general population after three or more years of lag time.
In this nationwide study, employment as electricians had marked effect on mortality. Appropriate reference selection and lag time analyses minimized the HWE bias.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21767353 View in PubMed
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The relationship between body mass index and periodontitis in the Copenhagen City Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149298
Source
J Periodontol. 2009 Aug;80(8):1246-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Johanne Kongstad
Ulla A Hvidtfeldt
Morten Grønbaek
Kaj Stoltze
Palle Holmstrup
Author Affiliation
Periodontology Section, Department of Odontology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. kon@odont.ku.dk
Source
J Periodontol. 2009 Aug;80(8):1246-53
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Susceptibility - epidemiology
Female
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Heart Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Periodontal Attachment Loss - epidemiology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Periodontitis - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Obesity is hypothesized to involve immunoinflammatory alterations, and the condition has been related to increased susceptibility to periodontitis. The present study analyzed the association between overweight/obesity and periodontitis assessed as clinical attachment loss (AL) and bleeding on probing (BOP) in a cross-sectional design.
Participants included 878 women and 719 men aged 20 to 95 years (participation rate 54%) who underwent an oral examination, including full-mouth recording of clinical AL and BOP. Overweight and obesity were assessed by body mass index (BMI) using the World Health Organization criteria. BMI was related to clinical AL (defined as mean > or =3 mm) and BOP (defined as > or =25%) by multivariable logistic regression in the total population and in subjects stratified by gender and smoking habits.
Obese participants had a lower odds ratio (OR) for clinical AL compared to participants with normal weight (OR: 0.60; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.36 to 0.99). The same tendency was observed in subjects stratified by smoking habit. Obese never-smokers had a lower OR for clinical AL compared to never-smoking participants with normal weight (OR: 0.32; 95% CI: 0.11 to 0.91). Overweight participants had a higher OR for BOP compared to subjects with normal weight (OR: 1.36; 95% CI: 1.04 to 1.78). In addition, overweight never-smokers had a higher OR for BOP compared to normal weight never-smokers (OR: 1.63; 95% CI: 1.03 to 2.59).
BMI may be inversely associated with clinical AL but positively related to BOP.
PubMed ID
19656024 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.