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[Distribution of medical research support: men without contacts are treated unfairly].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148649
Source
Lakartidningen. 2009 Jul 22-Aug 4;106(30-31):1872-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
Martin Hällsten
Ulf Sandström
Author Affiliation
Institutet för social forskning, Stockholms universitet. martin.hallsten@sofi.su.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2009 Jul 22-Aug 4;106(30-31):1872-3
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bibliometrics
Female
Humans
Male
Prejudice
Professional Competence
Research Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Research Support as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Sweden
PubMed ID
19739437 View in PubMed
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Quantity and/or Quality? The Importance of Publishing Many Papers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283670
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(11):e0166149
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Ulf Sandström
Peter van den Besselaar
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(11):e0166149
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bibliometrics
Databases, Bibliographic
Publications
Research Personnel
Sweden
Abstract
Do highly productive researchers have significantly higher probability to produce top cited papers? Or do high productive researchers mainly produce a sea of irrelevant papers-in other words do we find a diminishing marginal result from productivity? The answer on these questions is important, as it may help to answer the question of whether the increased competition and increased use of indicators for research evaluation and accountability focus has perverse effects or not. We use a Swedish author disambiguated dataset consisting of 48.000 researchers and their WoS-publications during the period of 2008-2011 with citations until 2014 to investigate the relation between productivity and production of highly cited papers. As the analysis shows, quantity does make a difference.
Notes
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Cites: PLoS One. 2016 Mar 09;11(3):e014950426960191
PubMed ID
27870854 View in PubMed
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Vicious circles of gender bias, lower positions, and lower performance: Gender differences in scholarly productivity and impact.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286509
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(8):e0183301
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Peter van den Besselaar
Ulf Sandström
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(8):e0183301
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Authorship
Female
Humans
Male
Publications
Sexism
Sweden
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
It is often argued that female researchers publish on average less than male researchers do, but male and female authored papers have an equal impact. In this paper we try to better understand this phenomenon by (i) comparing the share of male and female researchers within different productivity classes, and (ii) by comparing productivity whereas controlling for a series of relevant covariates. The study is based on a disambiguated Swedish author dataset, consisting of 47,000 researchers and their WoS-publications during the period of 2008-2011 with citations until 2015. As the analysis shows, in order to have impact quantity does make a difference for male and female researchers alike-but women are vastly underrepresented in the group of most productive researchers. We discuss and test several possible explanations of this finding, using a data on personal characteristics from several Swedish universities. Gender differences in age, authorship position, and academic rank do explain quite a part of the productivity differences.
Notes
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Cites: PLoS One. 2016 Nov 21;11(11):e016614927870854
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Cites: Nature. 2013 Dec 12;504(7479):211-324350369
PubMed ID
28841666 View in PubMed
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