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Healthcare processes must be improved to reduce the occurrence of orthopaedic adverse events.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144070
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2010 Dec;24(4):671-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Maria Unbeck
Nils Dalen
Olav Muren
Ulf Lillkrona
Karin Pukk Härenstam
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences at Danderyd Hospital, Division of Orthopaedics, Stockholm, Sweden. maria.unbeck@ds.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2010 Dec;24(4):671-7
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Orthopedic Procedures - adverse effects
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Many nonhealth industries have decades of experiences working with safety systems. Similar systems are also needed in healthcare to improve patient safety. Clinical incident reporting systems in healthcare identify adverse events but seriously underestimate the incidence of adverse events. A wide range of information sources and monitoring techniques are needed to understand and mitigate healthcare risks.
The purpose of this study was to identify patient safety risk factors that can lead to adverse events in adult orthopaedic inpatients.
A three-stage structured retrospective patient record review of consecutively admitted patients to the inpatient service of a large, urban Swedish hospital.
Records for all orthopaedic inpatients admitted during a 2-month period (n = 395) were screened using 12 criteria. Positive records were then reviewed in two stages by orthopaedic surgeons using a standardized protocol. Data were collected from the index admission and from subsequent visits or readmissions within 28 days of discharge.
Sixty patients experienced 65 healthcare associated adverse events. Affected patients had a length of hospital stay double that of patients without adverse events. Adverse events were more common in patients undergoing surgical procedures and patients with risk factors for anaesthesia. Although 59 of the adverse events occurred in patients who underwent surgery, only nine of the adverse events were due to deficiencies in surgical/anaesthesia technique. The others were related to deficiencies in healthcare processes. The most common adverse events were hospital acquired infections (n = 20) and delayed detection of urinary retention (n = 13). Six adverse drug events involved elderly patients (=65 years).
Orthopaedic care is a high risk activity for its typically elderly, often debilitated patients. Reducing adverse events in orthopaedic patients will require more multidisciplinary, interdepartmental teamwork strategies that focus on healthcare processes outside the operating room.
PubMed ID
20409063 View in PubMed
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Identification of adverse events at an orthopedics department in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156197
Source
Acta Orthop. 2008 Jun;79(3):396-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Maria Unbeck
Olle Muren
Ulf Lillkrona
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Division of Orthopedics, Stockholm, Sweden. maria.unbeck@ds.se
Source
Acta Orthop. 2008 Jun;79(3):396-403
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence - standards
Data Collection
Hospital Departments - standards
Humans
Medical Errors - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Orthopedics - standards
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Risk Management
Safety Management
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Adverse events (AEs) are common in acute care hospitals, but there have been few data concerning AEs in orthopedic patients. We tested and evaluated a patient safety model (the Wimmera clinical risk management model) and performed a three-stage retrospective review of records to determine the occurrence of AEs in adult orthopedic inpatients.
The computerized medical and nursing records of 395 patients were included and screened for AEs using 12 criteria. Positive records were then reviewed by two senior orthopedic surgeons using a standardized protocol. An AE had to have occurred during the index admission or within the first 28 days of discharge from the Orthopedics Department. Screening of additional systems for reporting of AEs was also carried out for the same period. The number of patients suffering an AE and the number of AEs were recorded.
Altogether, 60 (15 %) of 395 patients checked in the screening of records experienced 65 AEs (16%) due to healthcare management. Of the 65 AEs, 34 were estimated to have a high degree of preventability. 47 of the 65 AEs occurred during the index admission and 18 within 28 days of discharge. In screening of local and nationwide reporting systems for the same patients, 4 additional AEs were identified-2 of which were previously unknown. 67 different AEs were detected by using the Wimmera model (17%)
Using the Wimmera model with manual screening and review of records, many more AEs were detected than in all other traditional local and nationwide reporting systems used in Sweden when screening was done for the same period.
PubMed ID
18622845 View in PubMed
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