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30 records – page 1 of 3.

Body site of cutaneous malignant melanoma--a study on patients with hereditary and multiple sporadic tumours.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18404
Source
Melanoma Res. 2003 Jun;13(3):279-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
P. Gillgren
G. Brattström
J. Frisell
J. Palmgren
U. Ringborg
J. Hansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Stockholm Söder Hospital, and Stockholm University, Sweden. gillgren@telia.com
Source
Melanoma Res. 2003 Jun;13(3):279-86
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Body constitution
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - genetics
Neoplasms, Multiple Primary - epidemiology - genetics
Neoplasms, Second Primary - epidemiology - genetics
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Skin - pathology
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Individuals with an increased risk of developing cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) include members of kindreds with hereditary cutaneous malignant melanoma (HCMM) and patients who have already been treated for a CMM. Some of these patients develop multiple primary cutaneous malignant melanomas (MCMMs). Ultraviolet radiation is the main instigator of CMM. There are indications that patients in these high-risk groups react differently to sunlight than patients who develop a single sporadic CMM. The objectives of this study were to analyse tumour site in patients with HCMM and sporadic MCMM. Data on 2517 patients with 2608 CMMs from a population-based regional cancer registry were used. The new computer program EssDoll was used for the analyses of primary tumour sites. This software is able to analyse any chosen body area(s) with reference to the number of tumours arising there. When the site of the first and second tumours in patients with sporadic MCMM were analysed in a skin 'field division', there was a significant concordance with respect to site (P
PubMed ID
12777983 View in PubMed
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Cancer risk in patients with earlier diagnosis of cutaneous melanoma in situ.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20802
Source
Int J Cancer. 1999 Oct 29;83(3):314-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-29-1999
Author
C. Wassberg
M. Thörn
J. Yuen
T. Hakulinen
U. Ringborg
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1999 Oct 29;83(3):314-7
Date
Oct-29-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Melanoma - complications
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sex Factors
Skin Neoplasms - complications
Abstract
We calculated the short-term and long-term risks of developing cancer among 3,766 patients with a diagnosis of cutaneous melanoma in situ in Sweden from 1958 to 1992. In total, 393 patients developed a primary cancer at any site compared with an expected number of 177 [standardized incidence ratio (SIR) = 2.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.0-2.4]. Patients below 60 years of age at diagnosis had the highest SIR (2.7, 95% CI = 2.3-3.2). The overall risks were similar between men and women. The highest risk was seen during the first year of follow-up, though the risk remained elevated also after 15 or more years of follow-up. For specific sites, the highest SIR was found for developing invasive cutaneous malignant melanoma (SIR = 22.2). The risk of subsequent primary non-melanoma skin cancer was elevated 8-fold in men and almost 7-fold in women. An elevated risk was also found for female breast cancer (SIR = 1.4). Especially among women, other sites with increased cancer risk (though not significant) were non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (SIR = 1.9), multiple myeloma (3.2) and cancers of the colon (1.6) and pancreas (1.6). In conclusion, patients with melanoma in situ run a generally increased risk of developing primary cancers, especially cutaneous malignant melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer. The increased long-term risk of cancer after diagnosis of melanoma in situ may be due to continuing carcinogenic exposure or to intrinsic tumor susceptibility.
PubMed ID
10495422 View in PubMed
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CDKN2A germ-line mutations in individuals with multiple cutaneous melanomas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20060
Source
Cancer Res. 2000 Dec 15;60(24):6864-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2000
Author
J. Hashemi
A. Platz
T. Ueno
U. Stierner
U. Ringborg
J. Hansson
Author Affiliation
Radiumhemmet, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Cancer Res. 2000 Dec 15;60(24):6864-7
Date
Dec-15-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Base Sequence
Codon
Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4
Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 6
Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p16 - metabolism
Cyclin-Dependent Kinases - metabolism
DNA, Complementary - metabolism
Exons
Family Health
Female
Founder Effect
Gene Deletion
Genes, p16 - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Germ-Line Mutation
Humans
Male
Melanoma - genetics
Middle Aged
Molecular Sequence Data
Mutation
Polymorphism, Single-Stranded Conformational
Protein Binding
Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases - metabolism
Proto-Oncogene Proteins
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Skin Neoplasms - genetics
Abstract
Germ-line CDKN2A mutations are present in some kindreds with hereditary cutaneous melanoma, and in Sweden a founder mutation with an extra arginine in codon 113 (113insR) has been identified. We screened 80 individuals with at least two primary cutaneous melanomas, who were identified mainly by a search of a regional cancer registry, for germ-line CDKN2A mutations. In nine patients, CDKN2A alterations that may contribute to melanoma predisposition were detected. In six individuals with a family history of melanoma, the 113insR founder mutation was present. One patient, who also had a family history of melanoma, had a 24-bp deletion that included codons 62-69. An in vitro binding assay established that the resulting mutant p16 protein was unable to bind cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and cyclin-dependent kinase 6. Two patients without a family history of melanoma had CDKN2A alterations: (a) one had a mutation in the 5' noncoding sequence (-14C/T); and (b) the other had an insertion of an extra T in codon 28, which results in a stop signal in codon 43. The median age at diagnosis of the first melanoma was significantly lower, the number of primary melanomas was significantly higher, and the presence of a family history of melanoma was significantly more common in patients with CDKN2A mutations than in those without germ-line mutations. The proportion of CDKN2A mutation carriers was significantly higher among patients treated for three or more primary melanomas compared with those with two tumors only. We conclude that mutation screening of individuals with multiple primary melanomas is a useful strategy to identify new melanoma kindreds with CDKN2A germ-line mutations.
PubMed ID
11156381 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1996 Sep;116(5):641-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
U. Ringborg
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1996 Sep;116(5):641-6
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Male
Melanoma - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Middle Aged
Skin Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
8908237 View in PubMed
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Cutaneous malignant melanoma of the head and neck. Analysis of treatment results and prognostic factors in 581 patients: a report from the Swedish Melanoma Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24136
Source
Cancer. 1993 Feb 1;71(3):751-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-1993
Author
U. Ringborg
L E Afzelius
B. Lagerlöf
H O Adami
I. Augustsson
E. Blomqvist
B. Boeryd
E. Carlin
S. Edström
J. Eldh
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Radiumhemmet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Cancer. 1993 Feb 1;71(3):751-8
Date
Feb-1-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comparative Study
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Head and Neck Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - surgery
Humans
Lymphatic Metastasis
Male
Melanoma - mortality - pathology - surgery
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Skin Neoplasms - secondary
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND. Results of surgical treatment of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) have been highly variable, probably because of patient selection. Therefore, a study of representative patients with this disease was performed. METHODS. In a defined area of Sweden, 581 patients were analyzed. Clinical records and histopathologic findings were reviewed. The minimum follow-up time was 7 years. Prognostic factors were evaluated by the Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS. Evaluation of sex distribution, age, and anatomic site of the primary tumor showed that the patients were representative of all Swedish patients with CMM of the head and neck. The mean patient age at diagnosis was 64 years for both sexes. Fifty-three percent of the patients were women. Female patients had more tumors of the face than did male patients, whereas male patients were overrepresented among patients with tumors of the auricle-external ear canal and scalp-neck area. Localization to the face was observed in 68%, which is an overrepresentation of three to four times when skin surface is taken into consideration. Twenty-four percent of the patients had lentigo maligna melanoma. Only 33% of the patients had superficial spreading melanoma. In univariate analyses, sex, anatomic site of the primary tumor, histogenetic type, Clark level of invasion, and tumor thickness had prognostic power. In a multivariate analysis, tumor thickness, anatomic site of the primary tumor, and sex of the patient were independent prognostic factors. CONCLUSIONS. In representative patients with CMM of the head and neck, tumor thickness, anatomic site of the primary tumor, and sex of the patients were independent prognostic factors.
Notes
Comment In: Cancer. 1993 Dec 1;72(11):33668242564
PubMed ID
8431856 View in PubMed
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Dacarbazine-vindesine versus dacarbazine-vindesine-cisplatin in disseminated malignant melanoma. A randomised phase III trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21339
Source
Eur J Cancer. 1998 Aug;34(9):1368-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Author
U. Jungnelius
U. Ringborg
S. Aamdal
J. Mattsson
U. Stierner
C. Ingvar
P. Malmström
R. Andersson
M. Karlsson
K. Willman
E. Wist
G. Bjelkengren
R. Westberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Experimental Oncology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Cancer. 1998 Aug;34(9):1368-74
Date
Aug-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cisplatin - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Comparative Study
Dacarbazine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Hematologic Diseases - chemically induced
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - secondary
Male
Melanoma - drug therapy - secondary
Middle Aged
Nausea - chemically induced
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Skin Neoplasms - drug therapy
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Vindesine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Vomiting - chemically induced
Abstract
In a multicentre phase III study of disseminated malignant melanoma performed in Sweden and Norway, 326 patients were randomised to receive treatment with the combination dacarbazine [DTIC] (D) and vindesine (V) with or without the addition of cisplatin (P). D was given intravenously (i.v.) at a dose of 250 mg/m2 days 1-5 every 4 weeks and V was given i.v. at a dose of 3.0 mg/m2 day 1 weekly. P was given i.v. at a dose of 100 mg/m2 day 1 every 4 weeks. There was no statistically significant difference in overall survival between the treatment arms (P = 0.22). Increased toxicity was observed in the treatment arm containing P of which leucopenia, alopecia and nausea/vomiting were the most pronounced. The median time to progression was significantly longer in patients treated with DVP (4.2 versus 2.2 months, P = 0.007). In conclusion, adding P to DV did not change overall survival but did significantly increase toxicity.
PubMed ID
9849419 View in PubMed
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Early detection and prevention of cutaneous malignant melanoma: emphasis on Swedish activities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24999
Source
Med Oncol Tumor Pharmacother. 1991;8(3):183-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
U. Ringborg
B. Lagerlöf
M. Broberg
E. Månsson-Brahme
A. Platz
M. Thörn
Author Affiliation
Department of General Oncology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Med Oncol Tumor Pharmacother. 1991;8(3):183-7
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Incidence
Mass Screening - methods
Melanoma - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma has increased more than the incidence of any other malignant tumour disease in Sweden the last three decades. Parallel to the almost 6% annual increase in incidence there has been a 3% annual increase in mortality. The knowledge of significant risk factors for melanoma (intermittent sun exposure and phenotypic traits related to skin pigmentation and propensity for dysplastic nevi) as well as the relationship between thin tumours and a good prognosis has been used to develop strategies for primary and secondary prevention. In this paper the Swedish programs for education of physicians, nurses and the general population are presented. A nationwide program for the identification and follow-up of individuals with dysplastic nevus syndrome has been initiated. The effects of the programs are followed by population-based melanoma registries.
PubMed ID
1803179 View in PubMed
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Epidemiological characteristics of cutaneous malignant melanoma of the head and neck--a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20612
Source
Acta Oncol. 1999;38(8):1069-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
P. Gillgren
E. Månsson-Brahme
J. Frisell
H. Johansson
O. Larsson
U. Ringborg
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Stockholm Söder Hospital, Sweden. pgn@swipnet.se
Source
Acta Oncol. 1999;38(8):1069-74
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Head
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - pathology
Middle Aged
Neck
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Since cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) and melanoma in situ (MIS) of the head and neck have only partially been differentiated from CMM of other anatomic sites, these lesions are classified in detail in this study. Data from 756 patients derived from the population-based register of the Stockholm-Gotland area were analyzed and the findings showed that the incidence of CMM was 3.4 times higher in the face compared to the skin outside the head-neck area and that lentigo maligna melanoma was 74 times and nodular melanoma 2.3 times more common in the face. Mean age at diagnosis was significantly higher for patients with CMM of the head and neck irrespective of histogenetic type. Tumor site within the head and neck related to age at diagnosis. CMM of the head and neck differs from CMM of other locations. Epidemiological data are in agreement with the hypothesis that UV radiation (chronic or intermittent) may give rise to melanomas with various phenotypic traits.
PubMed ID
10665765 View in PubMed
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Increasing incidence rates of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19437
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2001 Aug-Sep;81(4):268-72
Publication Type
Article
Author
C. Wassberg
M. Thörn
A M Johansson
R. Bergström
B. Berne
U. Ringborg
Author Affiliation
Department Medical Sciences/Dermatology and Venereology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. Cecilia.Wassberg@medsci.uu.se
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2001 Aug-Sep;81(4):268-72
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The incidence of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin is increasing world-wide, and in Sweden this tumour is one of the most rapidly increasing malignancies. The aim of this study was to investigate incidence trends of squamous cell carcinoma in Sweden. For the 39,805 tumours registered in the Swedish Cancer Registry 1961-1995, incidence rates were calculated according to gender, age, anatomical site and unit surface area. Multivariate analysis was performed with the age-period-cohort model. Age-standardized incidence rates increased substantially in both men (+425%) and women (+146%) during this period. The highest rates per unit surface area were seen for chronically sun-exposed head-neck sites. Age-specific incidence rates increased in ages > or =60 years during the study period. Multivariate analyses showed that age, period and cohort effects in men could best explain the incidence rates, while in women the age-period effects model was adequate. In conclusion, a rapidly increasing incidence trend for squamous cell carcinoma was found, probably explained by increased accumulated sun exposure and increasing incidence among the elderly.
PubMed ID
11720174 View in PubMed
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Information to patients with malignant melanoma: a randomized group study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217999
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 1994 Jun;23(2):97-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
Y. Brandberg
M. Bergenmar
C. Bolund
H. Michelson
E. Månsson-Brahme
U. Ringborg
P O Sjödén
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 1994 Jun;23(2):97-105
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Educational Measurement
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Melanoma - psychology
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Pamphlets
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Skin Neoplasms - psychology
Sweden
Teaching Materials
Abstract
An information programme for patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma, Stage 1, aiming at increasing satisfaction with information, was carried out at the Department of Oncology (Radiumhemmet). The programme consisted of a group meeting and a brochure. A total of 231 consecutive patients were included, and 149 (65%) reported interest in participation and were randomized to the Information group (n = 77) or to the Control group. A total of 67 patients (29%) were not interested (the NI-group). To evaluate the programme, the patients in the three groups completed questionnaires regarding satisfaction with information, knowledge of melanoma and psychological and psychosomatic variables before randomization and at the first visit for follow-up at Radiumhemmet. After the information programme, the Information group was significantly more satisfied with information, had a higher level of knowledge and a lower proportion requested further information as compared with the Control group. No differences were found on the psychological and psychosomatic variables.
PubMed ID
21207908 View in PubMed
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30 records – page 1 of 3.