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A 3-year follow-up after anterior colporrhaphy compared with collagen-coated transvaginal mesh for anterior vaginal wall prolapse: a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272920
Source
BJOG. 2016 Jan;123(1):136-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
M. Rudnicki
E. Laurikainen
R. Pogosean
I. Kinne
U. Jakobsson
P. Teleman
Source
BJOG. 2016 Jan;123(1):136-42
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Collagen
Denmark - epidemiology
Dyspareunia - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Gynecologic Surgical Procedures - instrumentation - methods
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Pelvic Organ Prolapse - epidemiology - surgery
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Surgical Mesh
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Vagina - surgery
Abstract
To compare the 1-year (previously published) and 3-year objective and subjective cure rates, and complications, related to the use of a collagen-coated transvaginal mesh for anterior vaginal wall prolapse against a conventional anterior repair.
Randomised controlled study.
Six departments of obstetrics and gynaecology in Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Denmark.
A total of 138 women, of 55 years of age or older, admitted for stage =2 anterior vaginal wall prolapse.
The women scheduled for primary anterior vaginal wall prolapse surgery were randomised between conventional anterior colporrhaphy and surgery with a collagen-coated prolene mesh. All patients were evaluated using the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POP-Q) assessment before and after surgery. Symptoms related to pelvic organ prolapse were evaluated using the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire (PFIQ-7) and the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory (PFDI-20).
Objective cure, defined as POP-Q stage
PubMed ID
26420345 View in PubMed
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Anterior colporrhaphy compared with collagen-coated transvaginal mesh for anterior vaginal wall prolapse: a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106735
Source
BJOG. 2014 Jan;121(1):102-10; discussion 110-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
M. Rudnicki
E. Laurikainen
R. Pogosean
I. Kinne
U. Jakobsson
P. Teleman
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Roskilde University Hospital, Roskilde, Denmark.
Source
BJOG. 2014 Jan;121(1):102-10; discussion 110-1
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Collagen
Cystocele - surgery
Denmark
Female
Finland
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Sexuality
Surgical Mesh
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Vagina - surgery
Abstract
To investigate the anatomical cure rate and complications related to collagen-coated mesh for cystocele, compared with a conventional anterior colporrhaphy.
A randomised controlled study.
Six departments of obstetrics and gynaecology in Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Denmark.
Women aged 55 years or older, referred for surgery with a prolapse of the anterior vaginal wall of stage 2 or higher.
Women scheduled for primary cystocoele surgery were randomised to either anterior colporrhaphy or a collagen-coated Prolene mesh. Power analysis indicated that 130 patients had to be randomised. All patients were evaluated using the Pelvic Organ Prolapse-Quantification (POP-Q) measurement. Quality of life, symptoms, and sexual function were evaluated using the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire, the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory, and the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire.
The primary outcome was objective cure, defined as prolapse below POP-Q stage 2 at the 12-months follow-up. Secondary outcomes were quality of life, symptoms, and presence (or not) of complications.
In total, 161 women were randomised to either anterior colporrhaphy or mesh (participant ages 64.9 ± 6.4 years versus 64.7 ± 6.6 years, respectively; mean ± SD). The objective cure rate was 39.8% (95% CI 28.6-50.9%) in the anterior colporrhaphy group, compared with 88.1% (95% CI 80.7-95.6%) in the mesh group (P
PubMed ID
24118844 View in PubMed
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Chronic pain in older adults: prevalence, incidence, and risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285251
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2017 Jul;46(4):317-325
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
C. Larsson
E E Hansson
K. Sundquist
U. Jakobsson
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2017 Jul;46(4):317-325
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Chronic Pain - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Odds Ratio
Pain Measurement
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Chronic pain is common in older adults, yet little is known of its development and the factors that predict its persistence and onset at old age. The aims of this longitudinal cohort study were to examine the prevalence and incidence of chronic pain and to explore possible risk factors for its persistence and onset in a representative sample of older Swedish adults.
Data were collected through questionnaires and followed up after 12 and 24 months. Chronic pain was defined as pain symptoms that lasted more than 3 months, regardless of the specific cause or site. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for potential predictors.
Out of 2000 older adults approached (aged 65-103 years), 1141 were included in the study. Chronic pain was reported among 38.5% of the participants, and was more common among females and among adults over 85 years of age. The incidence was estimated to be 5.4% annually. Being female (OR 3.19, 95% CI 1.04-9.59), having a lower body mass index (BMI; OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.79-0.99), more than one pain location (OR 4.02, 95% CI 1.56-10.35), higher severity (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.13-2.83), and longer duration (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.01-1.15) were associated with the persistence of chronic pain, but this association did not remain significant for men when divided by gender. Younger age (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.89-0.99) was associated with new onset of chronic pain.
Even though pain was often highly prevalent and persistent, our results show that both recovery and onset of pain occurred. Pain characteristics, rather than age-related symptoms and psychosocial variables, predicted pain persistence among older women but not among older men. These findings highlight the importance of early pain management in the prevention of future pain.
PubMed ID
27885914 View in PubMed
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The epidemiology of chronic pain in a general population: results of a survey in southern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96963
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2010 May 17;
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-17-2010
Author
U. Jakobsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2010 May 17;
Date
May-17-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Objectives: The aim was to investigate the prevalence of chronic pain in different age groups and pain locations, as well as to identify variables associated with chronic pain. Methods: This cross-sectional survey had a randomized age-stratified sample comprising 826 respondents aged 18-102 years. Comparisons were made across age groups and pain locations. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify variables associated with chronic pain. Results: The overall pain prevalence rate was 46%, with a variance of 27-55% across age groups. The prevalence increased up to the 60-74-year age group, after which it remained more or less constant. The pain sites differed across age groups. Forty-six per cent of the respondents had not received any diagnosis or did not know the reason for their pain, while 21% had no pain management. Several complaints (e.g. appetite loss, constipation, fatigue, depressed mood) were both more prevalent and more severe among those in pain than those with no pain. The regression analysis showed that body mass index (BMI), fatigue, sleep, and mobility problems were significantly associated with chronic pain. Conclusions: Chronic pain is common and constitutes a major public health problem. Interventions should not only be focused on the pain per se but should also include coexisting factors.
PubMed ID
20476853 View in PubMed
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[Evaluation of coronary rehabilitation. Ambulatory aftercare improves recovery]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54441
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Dec 17;94(51-52):4903-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-17-1997

Prevalence and predictors of falls and dizziness in people younger and older than 80 years of age--a longitudinal cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120462
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2013 Jan-Feb;56(1):160-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
U. Olsson Möller
P. Midlöv
J. Kristensson
C. Ekdahl
J. Berglund
U. Jakobsson
Author Affiliation
Center for Primary Health Care Research, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, SE-205 02 Malmö, Sweden. ulrika.olsson_moller@med.lu.se
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2013 Jan-Feb;56(1):160-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition
Dizziness - complications - epidemiology
Drug Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The objectives were to investigate the prevalence and predictors for falls and dizziness among people younger and older than 80 years of age. The sample was drawn from the Swedish National study on Aging and Care (SNAC) and comprised 973 and 1273 subjects with data on the occurrence of falls and dizziness respectively at baseline. Follow-ups were made after 3- and 6-years. Data included socio-demographics, physical function, health complaints, cognition, quality of life and medications. The prevalence of falls was 16.5% in those under aged 80 and 31.7% in those 80+ years while dizziness was reported by 17.8% and 31.0% respectively. Predictors for falls in those under aged 80 were neuroleptics, dependency in personal activities of daily living (PADL), a history of falling, vision impairment and higher age, and in those 80+ years a history of falling, dependency in instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), fatigue and higher age. Factors predicting dizziness in those under aged 80 were a history of dizziness, feeling nervous and reduced grip strength and in those 80+ years a history of dizziness and of falling. Predictors for falls and dizziness differed according to age. Specific factors were identified in those under aged 80. In those 80+ years more general factors were identified implying the need for a comprehensive investigation to prevent falls. This longitudinal study also showed that falling and dizziness in many older people are persistent and therefore should be treated as chronic conditions.
PubMed ID
22999306 View in PubMed
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Psychometric analysis of the Salutogenic Health Indicator Scale (SHIS) in adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283846
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 May;45(3):253-259
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
P. Garmy
A. Berg
EK Clausson
P. Hagell
U. Jakobsson
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 May;45(3):253-259
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the Salutogenic Health Indicator Scale (SHIS) in an adolescent population.
The investigation was performed among Swedish students aged 13-15 years ( n = 817; 58% girls). The SHIS was assessed for respondent acceptability, and its psychometric properties were evaluated according to classical test theory (regarding unidimensionality, targeting, reliability, and external construct validity).
The adolescents found it easy to complete the questionnaire, which was completed in an average of 4 minutes. Exploratory factor analysis, which is based on polychoric correlations, identified one factor, supporting the instrument's unidimensionality. Floor/ceiling effects were ? 3.3%. Reliability estimates yielded a Cronbach's alpha value of 0.93; the test-retest reliability ( n = 50; 2-week interval) coefficients were 0.89 for the total SHIS score and 0.52-0.79 for item scores. Spearman correlations with other variables were based on a priori expectations (self-rated general health, 0.595; depressive symptoms, -0.773; anxiety, -0.577; and sleep problems, 0.519).
Our observations support both the acceptability and the psychometric properties of the SHIS as a brief, unidimensional assessment tool for salutogenic health in adolescents. Further studies using modern test theory are needed to better understand the measurement properties of the SHIS, including the functioning of its response categories and its comparability between adolescents and adults.
PubMed ID
27940537 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.