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A 4-year, cluster-randomized, controlled childhood obesity prevention study: STOPP.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99038
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Apr;33(4):408-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
C. Marcus
G. Nyberg
A. Nordenfelt
M. Karpmyr
J. Kowalski
U. Ekelund
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, National Childhood Obesity Centre, Stockholm, Sweden. claude.marcus@ki.se
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Apr;33(4):408-17
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Child
Cluster analysis
Female
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - prevention & control
Overweight - epidemiology - prevention & control
Parents - psychology
Physical Fitness - psychology
Prevalence
Risk Reduction Behavior
School Health Services
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of a school-based intervention programme to reduce the prevalence of overweight in 6 to 10-year-old children. DESIGN: Cluster-randomized, controlled study. SUBJECTS: A total of 3135 boys and girls in grades 1-4 were included in the study. METHODS: Ten schools were selected in Stockholm county area and randomized to intervention (n=5) and control (n=5) schools. Low-fat dairy products and whole-grain bread were promoted and all sweets and sweetened drinks were eliminated in intervention schools. Physical activity (PA) was aimed to increase by 30 min day(-1) during school time and sedentary behaviour restricted during after school care time. PA was measured by accelerometry. Eating habits at home were assessed by parental report. Eating disorders were evaluated by self-report. RESULTS: The prevalence of overweight and obesity decreased by 3.2% (from 20.3 to 17.1) in intervention schools compared with an increase of 2.8% (from 16.1 to 18.9) in control schools (P
PubMed ID
19290010 View in PubMed
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Calibration and cross-validation of a wrist-worn Actigraph in young preschoolers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266784
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2015 Feb;10(1):1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
E. Johansson
U. Ekelund
H. Nero
C. Marcus
M. Hagströmer
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2015 Feb;10(1):1-6
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actigraphy - instrumentation
Calibration
Child, Preschool
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Monitoring, Ambulatory - instrumentation
Motor Activity
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Play and Playthings
Reproducibility of Results
Sedentary lifestyle
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Wrist
Abstract
To calibrate the Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometer for wrist-worn placement in young preschoolers by developing intensity thresholds for sedentary, low- and high-intensity physical activity. Furthermore, to cross-validate the developed thresholds in young preschoolers.
Actigraph GT3X+ was used to measure physical activity during structured activities and free play in 38 children (15-36 months). Activity was video recorded and scored into sedentary, low- and high-intensity physical activity based on Children's Activity Rating Scale (CARS) and combined with accelerometer data using a 5?s epoch. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to develop intensity thresholds in 26 randomly selected children. The remaining 12 children were used for cross-validation.
Intensity thresholds for sedentary were =89 vertical counts (Y) and =221 vector magnitude (VM) counts per 5?s and =440 Y counts and =730 VM counts per 5?s for high-intensity physical activity. Sensitivity and specificity were 60-100% for the developed intensity thresholds. Strong correlations (Spearman rank correlation 0.69-0.91) were found in the cross-validation sample between the developed thresholds for the accelerometer and CARS scoring time in all intensity categories.
The developed intensity thresholds appear valid to categorize sedentary behaviour and physical activity intensity categories in children 2 years of age.
Notes
Comment In: Pediatr Obes. 2015 Feb;10(1):74-625074290
Comment In: Pediatr Obes. 2015 Aug;10(4):32825074065
PubMed ID
24408275 View in PubMed
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Children younger than 7 years with type 1 diabetes are less physically active than healthy controls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122099
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2012 Nov;101(11):1164-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
F. Sundberg
G. Forsander
A. Fasth
U. Ekelund
Author Affiliation
Diabetes Unit, Department of Paediatrics, The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital/Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. frida.sundberg@vgregion.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2012 Nov;101(11):1164-9
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry
Age Factors
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - psychology
Female
Heart rate
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Motor Activity
Prospective Studies
Seasons
Sedentary lifestyle
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
To examine if children younger than 7 years with type 1 diabetes are less physically active and spend more time sedentary than healthy children.
Using a repeated measures case-control study design, physical activity (PA) was measured by continuous combined accelerometer and heart rate registration for 7 days at two time points during 1 year (autumn and spring). PA data were expressed as time spent sedentary, in moderate and vigorous intensity PA and total PA. Differences between groups and gender were analysed with mixed linear regression models. In this study there were 24 children (12 girls) with type 1 diabetes mellitus and 26 (14 girls) healthy controls, all younger than 7 years at inclusion.
Children with diabetes were less active overall (p = 0.010) and spent 16 min less in moderate-to-vigorous PA (p = 0.006). The difference in sedentary time (21 min less) between groups was not significant (p = 0.21). Overall PA (12.1 counts/min per day, p = 0.004) and time in moderate and vigorous PA (16.0 min/day, p = 0.002) was significantly higher in boys than in girls. A significant effect of age was observed.
Physical activity is significantly reduced in young children with type 1 diabetes.
PubMed ID
22849395 View in PubMed
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Fat-free mass mediates the association between birth weight and aerobic fitness in youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100135
Source
Int J Pediatr Obes. 2010 Nov 4;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-2010
Author
C L Ridgway
S. Brage
S. Anderssen
L B Sardinha
L B Andersen
U. Ekelund
Author Affiliation
MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, Cambridge.
Source
Int J Pediatr Obes. 2010 Nov 4;
Date
Nov-4-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Abstract Objective. To investigate whether birth weight acts as a biological determinant of later aerobic fitness, and whether fat-free mass may mediate this association. Methods. The European Youth Heart Study (EYHS) is a population-based cohort of two age groups (9 and 15 years) from Denmark, Portugal, Estonia and Norway. Children with parentally reported birth weight >1.5 kg were included (n = 2 749). Data were collected on weight, height, and skinfold measures to estimate fat mass and fat-free mass. Aerobic fitness (peak power, watts) was assessed using a maximal, progressive cycle ergometer test. Physical activity was collected in a subset (n = 1 505) using a hip-worn accelerometer and defined as total activity counts/wear time, all children with >600 minutes/day for =3 days of wear were included. Results. Lower birth weight was associated with lower aerobic fitness, after adjusting for sex, age group, country, sexual maturity and socio-economic status (ß = 5.4; 95% CI: 3.5, 7.3 W per 1 kg increase in birth weight, p
PubMed ID
21050079 View in PubMed
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Objectively measured physical activity correlates with indices of insulin resistance in Danish children. The European Youth Heart Study (EYHS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30169
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2004 Nov;28(11):1503-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
S. Brage
N. Wedderkopp
U. Ekelund
P W Franks
N J Wareham
L B Andersen
K. Froberg
Author Affiliation
Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Main Campus, Odense University, Odense, Denmark. sb400@medschl.cam.ac.uk
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2004 Nov;28(11):1503-8
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - analysis
Child
Denmark
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Linear Models
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Skinfold thickness
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To explore the association between measures of insulin resistance with objectively assessed physical activity. DESIGN: School-based, cross-sectional study. SUBJECTS: A randomly selected sample of 589 children (310 girls, 279 boys, mean (standard deviations, s.d.) age=9.7 (0.44) y, weight=33.6 (6.4) kg, height=1.39 (0.06) m) from Denmark. METHODS: Fasting blood samples were analysed for serum insulin and glucose. Physical activity was measured with the uniaxial Computer Science and Applications (CSA) model 7164 accelerometer, worn for at least 3 days (>/=10 h day(-1)). Adiposity was assessed by the sum of four skinfolds. Multiple linear regression were performed to model insulin and glucose from average CSA output, adjusted for age, gender, puberty, ethnicity, birth weight, parental smoking, socioeconomic group, and CSA unit. In addition, we adjusted for skinfold thickness. RESULTS: Mean fasting serum glucose ranged from 4.1 to 6.5 mmol l(-1) with a mean (s.d.) of 5.1 (0.37) mmol l(-1). Fasting insulin was negatively correlated with CSA output on levels of adjustment. Fasting glucose was not significantly associated with physical activity. However, in girls both indices of insulin resistance were significantly related to activity, whereas in boys none of the associations were significant. CONCLUSION: Physical activity is inversely associated with fasting insulin in the nondiabetic range of fasting glucose. The relationship was stronger for insulin than for glucose, indicating compensatory action by the beta cells. Our data emphasise the importance of physical activity in children for the maintenance of metabolic control.
PubMed ID
15326467 View in PubMed
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Physical activity intensity and subclinical atherosclerosis in Danish adolescents: the European Youth Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117086
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2013 Jun;23(3):e168-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
M. Ried-Larsen
A. Grøntved
K. Froberg
U. Ekelund
L B Andersen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics, Research unit for Exercise Epidemiology, Centre of Research in Childhood Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. mried-larsen@health.sdu.dk
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2013 Jun;23(3):e168-77
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actigraphy
Adolescent
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Sex Factors
Vascular Stiffness
Abstract
The aim was to investigate the associations between physical activity (PA), cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and intima media thickness (IMT) or stiffness. This was a population-based cross-sectional study (n?=?336) of Danish adolescents [mean age (standard deviation, SD): 15.6 (0.4) years]. PA intensity was assessed objectively (ActiGraph model GT3X) and CRF using a progressive maximal bicycle test. Carotid IMT and arterial stiffness were assessed using B-mode ultrasound. In a multivariate analysis (adjusted for pubertal development and smoking status), CRF was inversely associated with measures of carotid stiffness (standard beta: -0.20 to -0.15, P?
PubMed ID
23336399 View in PubMed
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Secular and longitudinal physical activity changes in population-based samples of children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294232
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2018 Jan; 28(1):161-171
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2018
Author
K E Dalene
S A Anderssen
L B Andersen
J Steene-Johannessen
U Ekelund
B H Hansen
E Kolle
Author Affiliation
Department of Sports Medicine, the Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2018 Jan; 28(1):161-171
Date
Jan-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Accelerometry
Adolescent
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Sedentary lifestyle
Time Factors
Abstract
The aims of this study were to investigate whether physical activity (PA) and sedentary time (ST) in 9- and 15-year-olds differed between 2005-2006 and 2011-2012 (secular change), and to investigate changes in PA and ST from age 9 to 15 (longitudinal change). In 2005-2006, we invited nationally representative samples of Norwegian 9- (n=1470) and 15-year-olds (n=1348) to participate. In 2011-2012, we invited a new nationally representative sample of 9-year-olds (n=1945), whereas 15-year-olds (n=1759) were invited to participate either based on previous participation in 2005-2006 or from a random sample of schools. We assessed PA and ST objectively using accelerometers. In 2011-2012, both 9- and 15-year-olds spent more time sedentary (=35.7 min/d, P2 h/d (P
PubMed ID
28299832 View in PubMed
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Total daily energy expenditure and pattern of physical activity measured by minute-by-minute heart rate monitoring in 14-15 year old Swedish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49947
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 Mar;54(3):195-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
U. Ekelund
M. Sjöström
A. Yngve
A. Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Medical Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. ulf.ekelund@ioh.oru.se
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 Mar;54(3):195-202
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Basal Metabolism
Body mass index
Body Weight
Energy Metabolism
Exercise
Female
Heart rate
Humans
Male
Oxygen consumption
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) and patterns of physical activity among Swedish male and female adolescents and to relate the amount and intensity of physical activity to existing recommendations (energy expenditure equal to or above 12.4 kJ/kg/day or accumulation of 30 min/day in moderate physical activity equal to 4.5 times sedentary energy expenditure or more). DESIGN: TDEE, physical activity level (PAL=TDEE/BMR), energy expenditure (EE) and time spent in different intensities of physical activity were assessed by using minute-by-minute heart rate monitoring in combination with laboratory measured sedentary energy expenditure (SEE) and peak oxygen uptake. SETTING: Department of Physical Education and Health, Orebro University, and Department of Clinical Physiology, Orebro Medical Centre Hospital, Sweden. SUBJECTS: Eighty-two 14-15 y old adolescents (42 boys, 40 girls) from the city of Orebro, randomly selected through a two-stage sampling procedure. RESULTS: TDEE was 12.8 MJ/day and 10.0 MJ/day for boys and girls respectively (P/=4.5 SEE. Those (n=20) with the highest PAL values (>2.01 and 1.81, respectively) spent 149 min/day at a >/=4.5 SEE intensity level compared to 40 min/day for those (n=30) with the lowest PAL values (
Notes
Erratum In: Eur J Clin Nutr 2000 Jul;54(7):601
PubMed ID
10713740 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.