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Acute and overuse injuries among sports club members and non-members: the Finnish Health Promoting Sports Club (FHPSC) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299711
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2019 Jan 19; 20(1):32
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jan-19-2019
Author
L Ristolainen
K Toivo
J Parkkari
S Kokko
L Alanko
O J Heinonen
R Korpelainen
K Savonen
H Selänne
T Vasankari
L Kannas
J Villberg
U M Kujala
Author Affiliation
Orton Orthopaedic Hospital, Orton, Helsinki, Finland. leena.ristolainen@hotmail.fi.
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2019 Jan 19; 20(1):32
Date
Jan-19-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Athletic Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cumulative Trauma Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Exercise - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Sports - physiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Physical activity in adolescence is promoted for its multi-dimensional health benefits. However, too intensive sports participation is associated with an increased injury risk. Our aim was to compare the occurrence of acute and overuse injuries in Finnish sports club members and non-members and to report training and competing habits associated with a higher injury risk in sports club members.
In this cross-sectional survey targeted at 14-16-year-old adolescents, a structured questionnaire was completed by 1077 sports club members and 812 non-members. The main outcome measures were self-reported acute and overuse injuries, their location and type.
At least one acute injury in the past year was reported by 44.0% of sports club members and 19.8% of non-members (P?
PubMed ID
30660197 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Int J Sports Med. 1995 Feb;16(2):122-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1995
Author
U M Kujala
T. Nylund
S. Taimela
Author Affiliation
Helsinki Research Institute for Sports and Exercise Medicine, Helsinki Department of Physiology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Int J Sports Med. 1995 Feb;16(2):122-5
Date
Feb-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Ankle Injuries - epidemiology
Arm Injuries - epidemiology
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Child
Contusions - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fractures, Closed - epidemiology
Humans
Knee Injuries - epidemiology
Leg Injuries - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Seasons
Sex Factors
Sprains and Strains - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to characterize the type and severeity of acute injuries occurring in Finnish orienteerers in 1987 to 1991. The study is based on the orienteering license insurance records accounting for 2189 orienteering injuries during 69268 person-years of exposure in active orienteerers. Of these orienteerers, 73.0% were male; 73.5% (N = 1608) of all injuries occurred in males, so the injury rate was similar in males and females. The rate was highest in orienteerers 20 to 24 years of age and lowest in children. Injuries occurred most commonly during May to September (78.9% or all injuries), the months which include the orienteering competition season, and were more common during competitions (59.8%) than during training. A high number of the injuries occurred during weekends (58.9% of injuries) including 68.1% of all competition injuries and 44.9% of all training injuries. The lower limbs were involved in 1611 (73.6%) of cases, the ankle (28.7%) and the knee (23.2%) being the two most common injury locations. Sprains, strains and contusions were the most common injuries. Wounds were proportionally more common in males than in females while ankle sprains were more common in females. Fractures, seven open and 94 closed, accounted for 4.6% of injuries; they were most common in the hand/wrist/forearm (N = 44) and ankle (N = 16), and were more frequent during competition (62.3%) than during training. The most important areas for preventive measures seem to be the ankle and the knee.
PubMed ID
7751075 View in PubMed
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Acute injuries in soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, basketball, judo, and karate: analysis of national registry data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213683
Source
BMJ. 1995 Dec 2;311(7018):1465-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2-1995
Author
U M Kujala
S. Taimela
I. Antti-Poika
S. Orava
R. Tuominen
P. Myllynen
Author Affiliation
Unit for Sports and Exercise Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
BMJ. 1995 Dec 2;311(7018):1465-8
Date
Dec-2-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arm Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Basketball - injuries
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hand Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Hockey - injuries
Humans
Leg Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Martial Arts - injuries
Soccer - injuries
Abstract
To determine the acute injury profile in each of six sports and compare the injury rates between the sports.
Analysis of national sports injury insurance registry data.
Finland during 1987-91.
621,691 person years of exposure among participants in soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, basketball, judo, or karate.
Acute sports injuries requiring medical treatment and reported to the insurance company on structured forms by the patients and their doctors.
54,186 sports injuries were recorded. Injury rates were low in athletes aged under 15, while 20-24 year olds had the highest rates. Differences in injury rates between the sports were minor in this adult age group. Overall injury rates were higher in sports entailing more frequent and powerful body contact. Each sport had a specific injury profile. Fractures and dental injuries were most common in ice hockey and karate and least frequent in volleyball. Knee injuries were the most common cause of permanent disability.
Based on the defined injury profiles in the different sports it is recommended that sports specific preventive measures should be employed to decrease the number of violent contacts between athletes, including improved game rules supported by careful refereeing. To prevent dental injuries the wearing of mouth guards should be encouraged, especially in ice hockey, karate, and basketball.
Notes
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PubMed ID
8520333 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescent flexibility, endurance strength, and physical activity as predictors of adult tension neck, low back pain, and knee injury: a 25 year follow up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171052
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2006 Feb;40(2):107-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
L O Mikkelsson
H. Nupponen
J. Kaprio
H. Kautiainen
M. Mikkelsson
U M Kujala
Author Affiliation
Pajulahti Sports Center, Nastola, Finland. kesto@sci.fi
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2006 Feb;40(2):107-13
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aging - physiology
Child
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Knee Injuries - etiology
Low Back Pain - etiology
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Muscle Contraction - physiology
Neck Pain - etiology
Odds Ratio
Physical Endurance - physiology
Pliability
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
To examine whether adolescent flexibility, endurance strength, and physical activity can predict the later occurrence of recurrent low back pain, tension neck, or knee injury.
In 1976, 520 men and 605 women participated in a sit and reach test (flexibility) and a 30 second sit up test (endurance strength). In 1976 and 2001 (aged 37 and 42 years) they completed a questionnaire. Lifetime occurrence and risk of self reported low back pain and self reported, physician diagnosed tension neck and knee injury were calculated for subjects divided into tertiles by baseline results of strength and flexibility tests.
Men from the highest baseline flexibility tertile were at lower risk of tension neck than those from the lowest tertile (odds ratio (OR) 0.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.28 to 0.93). Women from the highest baseline endurance strength tertile were at lower risk of tension neck than those from the lowest tertile (OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.91). Men from the highest baseline endurance strength tertile were at higher risk of knee injury than those from the lowest tertile (OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.05 to 3.64). Men who at school age participated in physical activity were at lower risk of recurrent low back pain (OR 0.61; 95% CI 0.42 to 0.88) than those who did not.
Overall good flexibility in boys and good endurance strength in girls may contribute to a decreased risk of tension neck. High endurance strength in boys may indicate an increased risk of knee injury.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16431995 View in PubMed
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Associations between long-term physical activity, waist circumference and weight gain: a 30-year longitudinal twin study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162296
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2008 Feb;32(2):353-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
K. Waller
J. Kaprio
U M Kujala
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. katja.waller@sport.jyu.fi
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2008 Feb;32(2):353-61
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body Size - physiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Exercise - physiology
Female
Finland
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Twins, Dizygotic - physiology
Twins, Monozygotic - physiology
Weight Gain - physiology
Abstract
Physical activity level and obesity are both partly determined by genes and childhood environment. To determine the associations between long-term leisure-time physical activity, weight gain and waist circumference and whether these are independent of genes and childhood effects.
The study design is a 30-year follow-up twin study in Finland. For this study, 146 twin pairs were comprehensively identified from the large Finnish Twin Cohort. These twin pairs were discordant for both intensity and volume of leisure physical activity in 1975 and 1981 and were healthy in 1981. At follow-up in 2005, both members of 89 pairs were alive and participated in a structured telephone interview. In the interview self-measured weight and waist circumference, and physical activity level for the whole follow-up were assessed. Paired tests were used in the statistical analyses.
Waist circumference at 30-year follow-up (2005) and change in weight from 1975 to 2005.
In the 42 twin pairs discordant for physical activity at all time points during the 30-year period, the mean weight gain from 1975 through 2005 was 5.4 kg (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.0-8.9) less in the active compared to inactive co-twins (paired t-test, P=0.003). In 2005, the mean waist circumference was 8.4 cm (95% CI 4.0-12.7) less in the active compared with inactive co-twins (P
PubMed ID
17653065 View in PubMed
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Associations between sports participation, cardiorespiratory fitness, and adiposity in young adult twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138202
Source
J Appl Physiol (1985). 2011 Mar;110(3):681-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
L. Mustelin
A. Latvala
K H Pietiläinen
P. Piirilä
A R Sovijärvi
U M Kujala
A. Rissanen
J. Kaprio
Author Affiliation
Hjelt Institute, Dept. of Public Health, Twin Research Unit, PB 41, 00014 Univ. of Helsinki, Finland. linda.mustelin@helsinki.fi
Source
J Appl Physiol (1985). 2011 Mar;110(3):681-6
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - genetics
Adult
Body Size - genetics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Association Studies
Heart
Humans
Motor Activity - genetics
Physical Fitness - physiology
Sports
Statistics as Topic
Twins - genetics - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Exercise behavior, cardiorespiratory fitness, and obesity are strongly influenced by genetic factors. By studying young adult twins, we examined to what extent these interrelated traits have shared genetic and environmental etiologies. We studied 304 twin individuals selected from the population-based FinnTwin16 study. Physical activity was assessed with the Baecke questionnaire, yielding three indexes: sport index, leisure-time index, and work index. In this study, we focused on sport index, which describes sports participation. Body composition was determined using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and cardiorespiratory fitness using a bicycle ergometer exercise test with gas exchange analysis. The Baecke sport index was associated with high maximal oxygen uptake adjusted for lean body mass (Vo(2max)[adj]) (r = 0.40), with low body fat percentage (BF%) (r = -0.44) and low waist circumference (WC) (r = -0.29). Heritability estimates for the key traits were as follows: 56% for sport index, 71% for Vo(2max)[adj], 77% for body mass index, 66% for WC, and 68% for BF%. The association between sport index and Vo(2max) was mostly explained by genetic factors (70%), as were both the association between sport index and BF% (71%) and that between sport index and WC (59%). Our results suggest that genetic factors explain a considerable part of the associations between sports participation, cardiorespiratory fitness, and obesity.
PubMed ID
21193564 View in PubMed
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Associations of health-related behaviors, school type and health status to physical activity patterns in 16 year old boys and girls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207353
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1997 Sep;25(3):156-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
M. Aarnio
U M Kujala
J. Kaprio
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1997 Sep;25(3):156-67
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Alcohol Drinking
Body Weight
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Health status
Humans
Male
Physical Exertion
Schools
Smoking
Twins
Abstract
Sedentary behavior often begins in childhood and is associated with the development of risk factors for many chronic diseases in adulthood. Physical activity is considered important in the prevention of unfavorable changes in the risk factors. We investigated whether health-related behaviors, school type and health status are associated to physical activity among adolescents. A questionnaire was sent to all Finnish 16-year-old twins in 1991-93. A total of 3,254 twins responded. The response rate was 88%. Physical activity was classified into five categories (very active, active, moderately active, hardly active, inactive) based on self-reported frequency and intensity of physical activity. The analysis considered all subjects as individuals. Smoking was strongly associated with physical activity among girls and boys. Those who smoked regularly were less active. The type of school was also associated with physical activity. In general, those who attended comprehensive school or high school were physically more active, while those in vocational schools, particularly boys, were less active. Girls in lower physical activity groups reported more psychosomatic symptoms. Associations of self-reported health-related behaviors, school type and health status to physical activity seem to be the same among boys and girls. However, as the more active students are in comprehensive school or high school and the less active in vocational school, and physical inactivity is related to smoking and use of alcohol, health education should be tailored by school type.
PubMed ID
9360271 View in PubMed
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Asthma and other pulmonary diseases in former elite athletes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15860
Source
Thorax. 1996 Mar;51(3):288-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
U M Kujala
S. Sarna
J. Kaprio
M. Koskenvuo
Author Affiliation
Unit for Sports and Exercise Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Thorax. 1996 Mar;51(3):288-92
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - epidemiology
Bronchitis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Lung Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Odds Ratio
Physical Endurance
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sports
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The prevalence of asthma is rising and there are recent reports of increasing asthma rates among top level skiers and runners in the Nordic countries. METHODS: The lifetime occurrence of pulmonary diseases (asthma, chronic bronchitis, emphysema) and current bronchitis symptoms was compared in former elite male athletes (n = 1282) who represented Finland between 1920 and 1965 at least once in international competitions and controls (n = 777) who, at the age of 20, were classified as healthy and who responded to a questionnaire in 1985. The presence of disease and symptoms was identified from the questionnaire and, in the case of asthma, also from a nationwide reimbursable medication register. The death certificates of the subjects of our original cohort who died between 1936 and 1985 were also investigated to determine the cause of death. RESULTS: The occurrence of the pulmonary diseases was associated with age, smoking habits, occupational group, and a history of exposure to chemicals. After adjusting for these variables, athletes who participated in mixed sports (odds ratio (OR) 0.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.23 to 0.92) and power sports (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.87) had lower odds ratios for emphysema, and endurance sports athletes had a lower odds ratio for the presence of at least one pulmonary disease (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.28 to 0.98) when compared with controls. Athletes also tended to have fewer reimbursable medications for asthma and fewer current symptoms for chronic bronchitis. Between 1936 and 1985 two controls but none of the athletes died of asthma. CONCLUSIONS: The lifetime occurrence of asthma or other pulmonary diseases is not increased in former elite athletes, and exercise alone, even in a cold environment, did not appear to increase the prevalence of asthma, at least up to the mid 1980s.
PubMed ID
8779133 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular health in former elite male athletes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281780
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2016 May;26(5):535-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
J K Johansson
U M Kujala
S. Sarna
H. Karanko
P J Puukka
A M Jula
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2016 May;26(5):535-43
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Echocardiography
Exercise - physiology
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - epidemiology
Hypertension - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Exertion - physiology
Prevalence
Pulse Wave Analysis
Sports - physiology
Vascular Stiffness
Waist Circumference
Abstract
To increase our knowledge on the effects of previous and current physical activity on cardiovascular health, we studied a group of Finnish male former elite athletes (endurance, n?=?49; power, n?=?50) and their 49 age and area-matched controls, aged 64-89 years. Body mass index (BMI), fasting serum glucose, lipids, blood pressure, and ultrasonography of cardiac and carotid artery structure and function were measured. Former endurance athletes smoked less, had lower prevalence of hypertension, and had higher intensity and volume of leisure time physical activity (LTPA) than the controls. No difference was detected in cardiac or carotid artery structure and function between these groups. Former athletes performing high-intensity LTPA were slightly younger (possible selection bias), had lower BMI and waist circumference, lower use of antihypertensives, lower prevalence of diabetes, lower pulse wave velocity, and higher carotid artery elasticity than former athletes not performing high-intensity LTPA. In conclusion, former athletes had a higher intensity and volume of LTPA than the controls. Athletes performing vigorous LTPA had more elastic arteries than athletes performing moderately or no LTPA. Vigorous LTPA through the whole lifetime associates with good cardiovascular health, although the previous medical history may play an important role.
PubMed ID
25919653 View in PubMed
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Costs of diabetes medication among male former elite athletes in later life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282254
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2017 Apr;54(4):335-341
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
M K Laine
R. Kujala
J G Eriksson
H. Kautiainen
S. Sarna
U M Kujala
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2017 Apr;54(4):335-341
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy - economics - epidemiology
Exercise
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Insulin
Male
Sports
Abstract
Regular physical activity plays a major role, in both prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. Less is known whether vigorous physical activity during young adulthood is associated with costs of diabetes medication in later life. The aim of this study is to evaluate this question.
The study population consisted of 1314 former elite-class athletes and 860 matched controls. The former athletes were divided into three groups based on their active career sport: endurance, mixed and power sports. Information on purchases of diabetes medication between 1995 and 2009 was obtained from the drug purchase register of the Finnish Social Insurance Institution.
The total cost of diabetes medication per person year was significantly lower among the former endurance (mean 81 € [95% CI 33-151 €]) and mixed group athletes (mean 272 € [95% CI 181-388 €]) compared with the controls (mean 376 € [95% CI 284-485 €]), (p 
PubMed ID
27933516 View in PubMed
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40 records – page 1 of 4.