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Bullying at age eight and criminality in adulthood: findings from the Finnish Nationwide 1981 Birth Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138960
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2011 Dec;46(12):1211-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Andre Sourander
Anat Brunstein Klomek
Kirsti Kumpulainen
Anita Puustjärvi
Henrik Elonheimo
Terja Ristkari
Tuula Tamminen
Irma Moilanen
Jorma Piha
John A Ronning
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Psychiatry, Turku University and Turku University Hospital, 20520 Turku, Finland. andre.sourander@utu.fi
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2011 Dec;46(12):1211-9
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bullying
Child
Crime - statistics & numerical data
Crime Victims - statistics & numerical data
Criminals - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Sex Distribution
Time
Young Adult
Abstract
There are no prospective population-based studies examining predictive associations between childhood bullying behavior and adult criminality.
To study predictive associations between bullying and victimization at age eight and adult criminal offenses.
Nationwide birth cohort study from age 8 to 26 years.
The sample consists of 5,351 Finnish children born in 1981 with information about bullying and victimization at age eight from parents, teachers, and the children themselves.
National police register information about criminal offenses at age 23-26 years.
When controlled for the parental education level and psychopathology score, bullying sometimes and frequently independently predicted violent (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.9-7.9, p
PubMed ID
21120451 View in PubMed
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Childhood antecedents of being a cigarette smoker in early adulthood. The Finnish 'From a Boy to a Man' Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152703
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2009 Mar;50(3):343-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Solja Niemelä
André Sourander
Daniel J Pilowsky
Ezra Susser
Hans Helenius
Jorma Piha
Kirsti Kumpulainen
Irma Moilanen
Tuula Tamminen
Fredrik Almqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. solja.niemela@utu.f
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2009 Mar;50(3):343-51
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mood Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Smoking - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To identify childhood psychiatric symptoms as antecedents of cigarette smoking at age 18.
In 1989, a general population sample of 2946 8-year-old boys born in Finland in 1981 was assessed using the Rutter's parent and teacher questionnaires, and the Child Depression Inventory. This birth cohort was followed up in 1999, when the subjects reported for their obligatory military service at age 18. Information about cigarette smoking frequency was obtained from 78% (n = 2307) of the boys attending the study in 1989.
Childhood hyperactivity and self-reported depressive symptoms correlated with moderate daily (1-10 cigarettes), and heavy daily (>10 cigarettes) smoking at age 18. Conduct problems correlated with heavy daily smoking. A high level of childhood depressive symptoms, particularly in conjunction with a low educational level of the father, increased the risk of daily smoking. Emotional problems decreased the risk of smoking at age 18. In general, teacher reports had a better predictive power than parent reports for subsequent smoking.
Future developmental studies with special focus on interaction between individual and environmental factors are warranted to reveal the mechanisms underlying the association between childhood psychopathology and adult smoking. In particular, the associations between childhood depression and future smoking need more clarification.
PubMed ID
19207628 View in PubMed
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Childhood bullies and victims and their risk of criminality in late adolescence: the Finnish From a Boy to a Man study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163185
Source
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2007 Jun;161(6):546-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Andre Sourander
Peter Jensen
John A Rönning
Henrik Elonheimo
Solja Niemelä
Hans Helenius
Kirsti Kumpulainen
Jorma Piha
Tuula Tamminen
Irma Moilanen
Fredrik Almqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. andre.sourander@utu.fi
Source
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2007 Jun;161(6):546-52
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Agonistic Behavior
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - complications
Cohort Studies
Crime Victims - psychology
Educational Status
Finland
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Parents
Abstract
To study correlations of childhood bullying and victimization with juvenile criminality.
Longitudinal birth cohort study from age 8 years to ages 16 to 20 years.
Population-based study from Finland.
The sample comprised 2551 boys (86.6% of the original birth cohort) with complete information about bullying and victimization from parents, teachers, and children at age 8 years.
Information about criminal offenses from the National Police Register at ages 16 to 20 years.
Frequent bullies and those who frequently both bullied and were bullied (8.8% of the sample) were responsible for 33.0% of all juvenile crimes during the 4-year study period. Frequent bully-only status predicted both occasional and repeated offending, whereas bully-victim status predicted repeated offending. Bullying predicted most types of crime (violence, property, drunk driving, and traffic offenses) when controlled with parental education level. However, frequent bullies or victims without a high level of psychiatric symptoms were not at an elevated risk for later criminality.
Boys who frequently bully are at risk for later criminality when this condition is accompanied by a high level of psychiatric symptoms. Frequent bullies should be actively screened for psychiatric problems.
PubMed ID
17548758 View in PubMed
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Childhood bullying and becoming a young father in a national cohort of Finnish boys.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121266
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2012 Dec;53(6):461-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Venla Lehti
Anat Brunstein Klomek
Tuula Tamminen
Irma Moilanen
Kirsti Kumpulainen
Jorma Piha
Fredrik Almqvist
Andre Sourander
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Psychiatry, University of Turku, Itäinen Pitkäkatu 1, Varia, Finland. venla.lehti@utu.fi
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2012 Dec;53(6):461-6
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bullying - psychology
Child
Crime Victims - psychology
Fathers - psychology
Finland
Humans
Male
Parenting - psychology
Peer Group
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Childhood bullying is known to be associated with various adverse psychosocial outcomes in later life. No studies exist on its association with becoming a young father. The study is based on a national cohort, which included 2,946 Finnish boys at baseline in 1989. Information on bullying was collected from children, their parents and their teachers. Follow-up data on becoming a father under the age of 22 were collected from a nationwide register. The follow-up sample included 2,721 boys. Bullying other children frequently was significantly associated with becoming a young father independently of being victimized, childhood psychiatric symptoms and parental educational level. Being a victim of bullying was not associated with becoming a young father when adjusted for possible confounders. When the co-occurrence of bullying and victimization was studied, it was found that being a bully-victim, but not a pure bully or a pure victim, is significantly associated with becoming a young father. This study adds to other studies, which have shown that the risk profile and relational patterns of bully-victims differ from those of other children, and it emphasizes the importance of including peer relationships when studying young fathers.
PubMed ID
22924804 View in PubMed
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Childhood bullying as a predictor for becoming a teenage mother in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138796
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2011 Jan;20(1):49-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
laboratoires publics ou privés. Childhood bullying as a predictor for becoming a teenage mother in Finland Venla Lehti, Andre Sourander, Anat Klomek, Solja Niemelä, Lauri Sillanmäki, Jorma Piha, Kirsti Kumpulainen, Tuula Tamminen, Irma Moilanen, Fredrik Almqvist To cite this version: Venla Lehti, Andre
  1 document  
Author
Venla Lehti
Andre Sourander
Anat Klomek
Solja Niemelä
Lauri Sillanmäki
Jorma Piha
Kirsti Kumpulainen
Tuula Tamminen
Irma Moilanen
Fredrik Almqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Psychiatry, University of Turku, Itäinen Pitkäkatu 1 / Varia, 20014, Turku, Finland. venla.lehti@utu.fi
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2011 Jan;20(1):49-55
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
240491
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth rate
Bullying - psychology
Child
Crime Victims - psychology - rehabilitation
Family Health
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Peer Group
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence - prevention & control - psychology
Research Report
Risk factors
Sex Education - organization & administration
Social Support
Violence - prevention & control - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study is to examine the association between bullying behaviour at the age of 8 and becoming a mother under the age of 20. This birth cohort study included 2,867 Finnish girls at baseline in 1989. Register-based follow-up data on births was collected until the end of 2001. Information, both on the main exposure and outcome, was available for 2,507 girls. Both bullies and victims had an increased risk of becoming a teenage mother independent of family-related risk factors. When controlled for childhood psychopathology, however, the association remained significant for bullies (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-4.1) and bully-victims (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.05-3.2), but not for pure victims. Reports of bullying and victimisation from the girls themselves, their parents and their teachers were all associated with becoming a teenage mother independent of each other. There is a predictive association between being a bully in childhood and becoming a mother in adolescence. It may be useful to target bullies for teenage pregnancy prevention.
Notes
Comment In: Evid Based Ment Health. 2011 Aug;14(3):6421764863
PubMed ID
21136277 View in PubMed
Documents

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Childhood bullying as a risk for later depression and suicidal ideation among Finnish males.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159137
Source
J Affect Disord. 2008 Jul;109(1-2):47-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Anat Brunstein Klomek
Andre Sourander
Kirsti Kumpulainen
Jorma Piha
Tuula Tamminen
Irma Moilanen
Fredrik Almqvist
Madelyn S Gould
Author Affiliation
Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. klomeka@childpsych.columbia.edu
Source
J Affect Disord. 2008 Jul;109(1-2):47-55
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aggression - psychology
Child
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Prevalence
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Little is known about the predictive association between childhood bullying behavior with depression and suicidal ideation at age 18.
The sample included 2348 boys born in 1981. Information about bullying was gathered at the age of 8 from self, parent and teacher's reports. Depression and suicidal ideation were assessed during the Finnish military call-up examination.
Based on regression models, boys who were bullies frequently, but not merely sometimes, were more likely to be severely depressed and to report suicidal ideation compared to boys who were not bullies. When controlling for depression at age 8 the association between frequent bullying and severe depression was maintained but the association with suicidal ideation became non-significant. Boys who were only victimized were not more likely to be depressed or to report suicidal ideation at age 18. Boys who were frequently both bullies and victims were found to be at risk for later depression.
Our finding can only be generalized to boys who were involved in bullying at elementary school age. Data at age 18 was based only on self-reports and the bullying/victimization questions were very general.
Childhood bullying behavior is a risk factor for later depression. Screening and intervention for bullying behavior in the early school years is recommended to avoid subsequent internalizing problem in late adolescence.
PubMed ID
18221788 View in PubMed
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Childhood bullying behavior and later psychiatric hospital and psychopharmacologic treatment: findings from the Finnish 1981 birth cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148668
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2009 Sep;66(9):1005-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Andre Sourander
John Ronning
Anat Brunstein-Klomek
David Gyllenberg
Kirsti Kumpulainen
Solja Niemelä
Hans Helenius
Lauri Sillanmäki
Terja Ristkari
Tuula Tamminen
Irma Moilanen
Jorma Piha
Fredrik Almqvist
Author Affiliation
Regional Center of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tromsö University, Tromsö, Norway. andre.sourander@utu.fi
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2009 Sep;66(9):1005-12
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child Abuse - diagnosis - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitalization
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Risk factors
Abstract
No prospective population-based study examining predictive associations between childhood bullying behavior and long-term mental health outcomes in both males and females exists.
To study predictive associations between bullying and victimization in childhood and later psychiatric hospital and psychopharmacologic treatment.
Nationwide birth cohort study from age 8 to 24 years.
Five thousand thirty-eight Finnish children born in 1981 with complete information about bullying and victimization at age 8 years from parents, teachers, and self-reports.
National register-based lifetime information about psychiatric hospital treatments and psychopharmacologic medication prescriptions.
When controlled for psychopathology score, frequent victim status at age 8 years among females independently predicted psychiatric hospital treatment and use of antipsychotic, antidepressant, and anxiolytic drugs. Among males, frequent bully-victim and bully-only statuses predicted use of antidepressant and anxiolytic drugs. Frequent bully-victim status among males also predicted psychiatric hospital treatment and use of antipsychotics. However, when the analysis was controlled with total psychopathology score at age 8 years, frequent bully, victim, or bully-victim status did not predict any psychiatric outcomes among males.
Boys and girls who display frequent bullying behavior should be evaluated for possible psychiatric problems, as bullying behaviors in concert with psychiatric symptoms are early markers of risk of psychiatric outcome. Among females, frequent childhood victimization predicts later psychiatric problems irrespective of psychiatric problems at baseline.
Notes
Comment In: Evid Based Ment Health. 2010 May;13(2):5921856622
PubMed ID
19736357 View in PubMed
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Childhood bullying behaviors as a risk for suicide attempts and completed suicides: a population-based birth cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152974
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2009 Mar;48(3):254-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Anat Brunstein Klomek
Andre Sourander
Solja Niemelä
Kirsti Kumpulainen
Jorma Piha
Tuula Tamminen
Fredrik Almqvist
Madelyn S Gould
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Columbia University/NYSPI, 1051 Riverside Drive, Unit 72, New York, NY 10032, USA. klomeka@childpsych.columbia.edu
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2009 Mar;48(3):254-61
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cause of Death
Child
Cohort Studies
Conduct Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Crime Victims - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Dominance-Subordination
Female
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Peer Group
Personality Assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
There are no previous studies about the association of childhood bullying behavior with later suicide attempts and completed suicides among both sexes. The aim was to study associations between childhood bullying behaviors at age 8 years and suicide attempts and completed suicides up to age 25 years in a large representative population-based birth cohort.
The sample includes 5,302 Finnish children born in 1981. Information about bullying was gathered at age 8 years from self-report, as well as parent and teacher reports. Information about suicide attempts requiring hospital admission and completed suicides was gathered from three different Finnish registries until the study participants were 25 years old. Regression analyses were conducted to determine whether children who experience childhood bullying behaviors are at risk for later suicide attempts and completed suicides after controlling for baseline conduct and depression symptoms.
The association between bullying behavior at age 8 years and later suicide attempts and completed suicides varies by sex. Among boys, frequent bullying and victimization are associated with later suicide attempts and completed suicides but not after controlling for conduct and depression symptoms; frequent victimization among girls is associated with later suicide attempts and completed suicides, even after controlling for conduct and depression symptoms.
When examining childhood bullying behavior as a risk factor for later suicide attempts and completed suicides, each sex has a different risk profile.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2009 Oct;48(10):1039; author reply 1039-4120854772
Comment In: Evid Based Ment Health. 2009 Nov;12(4):12419854786
Comment In: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2009 Mar;48(3):237-919242288
PubMed ID
19169159 View in PubMed
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Childhood predictors of antipsychotic use among young people in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125500
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2012 Sep;21(9):964-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
David Gyllenberg
Andre Sourander
Hans Helenius
Lauri Sillanmäki
Jukka Huttunen
Jorma Piha
Kirsti Kumpulainen
Tuula Tamminen
Irma Moilanen
Fredrik Almqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Psychiatry, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland. david.gyllenberg@helsinki.fi
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2012 Sep;21(9):964-71
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Antipsychotic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Mood Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology
Psychotic Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology
Registries
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Information on who uses antipsychotic medication is limited to cross-sectional data. The objective of this study was to study the patterns of psychopathology at age 8?years and antipsychotic use between the ages of 12 and 25?years.
A total of 5525 subjects from the Finnish Nationwide 1981 birth cohort were linked to the National Prescription Register and the Hospital Discharge Register between 1994 and 2005. Information about parent-reported and teacher-reported conduct, hyperkinetic and emotional symptoms, and self-reported depressive symptoms was gathered at age 8?years. Information about antipsychotic use and about psychiatric disorders treated in hospitals between the ages of 12 and 25?years was register based. Diagnostic classes of hospital treatment included non-affective psychoses, affective disorders, and other psychiatric disorders.
The cumulative incidence of antipsychotic use by age 25?years was 2.8% among men (n?=?69) and 2.1% among women (n?=?55). In both sexes, living with other than two biological parents at age 8?years was associated with antipsychotic use, and three fourths of antipsychotic users had been treated for psychiatric disorders in a hospital. Among men, the most common hospital diagnosis was non-affective psychoses (44% of all antipsychotic users), and antipsychotic use was associated with childhood conduct problems. Among women, the most common hospital diagnosis was affective disorders (38% of all antipsychotic users), and antipsychotic use was associated with emotional problems and self-reported depressive symptoms in childhood.
Antipsychotic use in adolescence and young adulthood is different among men versus women both with regard to hospital diagnoses and childhood psychiatric problems.
PubMed ID
22473622 View in PubMed
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Childhood predictors of becoming a teenage mother among Finnish girls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121743
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Nov;91(11):1319-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Venla Lehti
Solja Niemelä
Maria Heinze
Lauri Sillanmäki
Hans Helenius
Jorma Piha
Kirsti Kumpulainen
Tuula Tamminen
Fredrik Almqvist
Andre Sourander
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Psychiatry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. venla.lehti@utu.fi
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Nov;91(11):1319-25
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology
Child
Cohort Studies
Conduct Disorder - epidemiology
Family Characteristics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Mothers
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To study predictive associations between psychosocial factors at age 8 and becoming a mother under the age of 20.
Prospective follow-up study.
Finland.
2867 girls born in 1981.
Information on family background and psychiatric symptoms was collected at age 8. The associations between these factors and becoming a teenage mother were analyzed using logistic regression analysis.
Data on births by the age of 20 collected from the hospital discharge register.
128 girls (4.8%) had given birth at the age of 15-19 years. Childhood conduct problems and hyperactive problems, having young mother and family structure other than two biological parents had an independent association with becoming a teenage mother.
Girls with externalizing type of problems in childhood have an increased risk of becoming teenage mothers. These problems may also complicate their motherhood.
PubMed ID
22882123 View in PubMed
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37 records – page 1 of 4.