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Allergic rhinitis alone or with asthma is associated with an increased risk of sickness absences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142913
Source
Respir Med. 2010 Nov;104(11):1654-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Paula Kauppi
Paula Salo
Riina Hakola
Jaana Pentti
Tuula Oksanen
Mika Kivimäki
Jussi Vahtera
Tari Haahtela
Author Affiliation
Skin and Allergy Hospital, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. paula.kauppi@hus.fi
Source
Respir Med. 2010 Nov;104(11):1654-8
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asthma - economics - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Public Sector - statistics & numerical data
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - economics - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sick Leave - economics - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study is to examine the risk of sickness absence in public sector employees with allergic rhinitis or asthma or both conditions combined. This is a prospective cohort study of 48,296 Finnish public sector employees. Data from self-reported rhinitis and asthma were obtained from survey responses given during either the 2000-2002 or 2004 periods. Follow-up data on sickness absences for the public sector employees surveyed were acquired from records kept by the employers. During the follow-up, mean sick leave days per year for respondents were 17.6 days for rhinitis alone, 23.8 days for asthma alone and 24.2 days for both conditions combined. Respondents with neither condition were absent for a mean of 14.5 days annually. The impact of asthma and rhinitis combined on the risk of sick leave days was marginal compared to asthma alone (RR 1.1; 95% CI 1.0-1.3). In the subgroup analysis (those with current asthma or allergy medication), the risk ratio for medically certified sickness absence (>3 days) was 2.0 (95% CI 1.9-2.2) for those with asthma and rhinitis combined. Rhinitis, asthma and both these conditions combined increased the risk of days off work.
PubMed ID
20542677 View in PubMed
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Antidepressant use before and after the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes: a longitudinal modeling study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144431
Source
Diabetes Care. 2010 Jul;33(7):1471-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Mika Kivimäki
Adam G Tabák
Debbie A Lawlor
G David Batty
Archana Singh-Manoux
Markus Jokela
Marianna Virtanen
Paula Salo
Tuula Oksanen
Jaana Pentti
Daniel R Witte
Jussi Vahtera
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK. m.kivimaki@ucl.ac.uk
Source
Diabetes Care. 2010 Jul;33(7):1471-6
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - psychology
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Abstract
To examine antidepressant use before and after the diagnosis of diabetes.
This study was a longitudinal analysis of diabetic and nondiabetic groups selected from a prospective cohort study of 151,618 men and women in Finland (the Finnish Public Sector Study, 1995-2005). We analyzed the use of antidepressants in those 493 individuals who developed type 2 diabetes and their 2,450 matched nondiabetic control subjects for each year during a period covering 4 years before and 4 years after the diagnosis. For comparison, we undertook a corresponding analysis on 748 individuals who developed cancer and their 3,730 matched control subjects.
In multilevel longitudinal models, the odds ratio for antidepressant use in those who developed diabetes was 2.00 (95% CI 1.57-2.55) times greater than that in nondiabetic subjects. The relative difference in antidepressant use between these groups was similar before and after the diabetes diagnosis except for a temporary peak in antidepressant use at the year of the diagnosis (OR 2.66 [95% CI 1.94-3.65]). In incident cancer case subjects, antidepressant use substantially increased after the cancer diagnosis, demonstrating that our analysis was sensitive for detecting long-term changes in antidepressant trajectories when they existed.
Awareness of the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes may temporarily increase the risk of depressive symptoms. Further research is needed to determine whether more prevalent use of antidepressants noted before the diagnosis of diabetes relates to effects of depression, side effects of antidepressant use, or a common causal pathway for depression and diabetes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20368411 View in PubMed
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Association of contractual and subjective job insecurity with sickness presenteeism among public sector employees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141949
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2010 Aug;52(8):830-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Tarja Heponiemi
Marko Elovainio
Jaana Pentti
Marianna Virtanen
Hugo Westerlund
Pekka Virtanen
Tuula Oksanen
Mika Kivimäki
Jussi Vahtera
Author Affiliation
Service System Research Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. tarja.heponiemi@thl.fi
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2010 Aug;52(8):830-5
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude
Cross-Sectional Studies
Employment
Faculty
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nurses
Occupational Health
Personnel Management - statistics & numerical data
Public Sector - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
We examined the associations of contractual job insecurity (fixed-term vs permanent employment contract) and subjectively assessed job insecurity with sickness presenteeism among those who had no sickness absences during the study year.
Survey data from a sample of 18,454 Public sector employees were gathered in 2004 (the Finnish Public Sector study).
Fixed-term employees were less likely to report working while ill (odds ratio = 0.88, 95% confidence interval = 0.77 to 0.99) than permanent employees. Subjective insecurity was associated with higher levels of working while ill, and this association was stronger among older employees. These results remained after adjustments for demographics, health-related variables, and optimism.
Our results suggest that subjective job insecurity might be even more important than contractual insecurity when a public sector employee makes the decision to go to work despite feeling ill.
PubMed ID
20657303 View in PubMed
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Association of physical activity with future mental health in older, mid-life and younger women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263892
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2014 Oct;24(5):813-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Amanda Griffiths
Anne Kouvonen
Jaana Pentti
Tuula Oksanen
Marianna Virtanen
Paula Salo
Ari Väänänen
Mika Kivimäki
Jussi Vahtera
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2014 Oct;24(5):813-8
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Exercise - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Life Style
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Mental ill-health, particularly depression and anxiety, is a leading and increasing cause of disability worldwide, especially for women.
We examined the prospective association between physical activity and symptoms of mental ill-health in younger, mid-life and older working women. Participants were 26 913 women from the ongoing cohort Finnish Public Sector Study with complete data at two phases, excluding those who screened positive for mental ill-health at baseline. Mental health was assessed using the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. Self-reported physical activity was expressed in metabolic equivalent task (MET) hours per week. Logistic regression models were used to analyse associations between physical activity levels and subsequent mental health.
There was an inverse dose-response relationship between physical activity and future symptoms of mental ill-health. This association is consistent with a protective effect of physical activity and remained after adjustments for socio-demographic, work-related and lifestyle factors, health and body mass index. Furthermore, those mid-life and older women who reported increased physical activity by more than 2 MET hours per week demonstrated a reduced risk of later mental ill-health in comparison with those who did not increase physical activity. This protective effect of increased physical activity did not hold for younger women.
This study adds to the evidence for the protective effect of physical activity for later mental health in women. It also suggests that increasing physical activity levels may be beneficial in terms of mental health among mid-life and older women. The alleviation of menopausal symptoms may partly explain age effects but further research is required.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24532567 View in PubMed
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Average household income, crime, and smoking behaviour in a local area: the Finnish 10-Town study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164963
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2007 May;64(9):1904-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Marianna Virtanen
Mika Kivimäki
Anne Kouvonen
Marko Elovainio
Anne Linna
Tuula Oksanen
Jussi Vahtera
Author Affiliation
Work and Organizations, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, Helsinki FIN 00250, Finland. marianna.virtanen@ttl.fi
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2007 May;64(9):1904-13
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Crime
Data Collection
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Class
Abstract
Social environments, like neighbourhoods, are increasingly recognised as determinants of health. While several studies have reported an association of low neighbourhood socio-economic status with morbidity, mortality and health risk behaviour, little is known of the health effects of neighbourhood crime rates. Using the ongoing 10-Town study in Finland, we examined the relations of average household income and crime rate measured at the local area level, with smoking status and intensity by linking census data of local area characteristics from 181 postal zip codes to survey responses to smoking behaviour in a cohort of 23,008 municipal employees. Gender-stratified multilevel analyses adjusted for age and individual occupational status revealed an association between low local area income rate and current smoking. High local area crime rate was also associated with current smoking. Both local area characteristics were strongly associated with smoking intensity. Among ever-smokers, being an ex-smoker was less likely among residents in areas with low average household income and a high crime rate. In the fully adjusted model, the association between local area income and smoking behaviour among women was substantially explained by the area-level crime rate. This study extends our knowledge of potential pathways through which social environmental factors may affect health.
PubMed ID
17324492 View in PubMed
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Change in organizational justice as a predictor of insomnia symptoms: longitudinal study analysing observational data as a non-randomized pseudo-trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292126
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2017 08 01; 46(4):1277-1284
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-01-2017
Author
Tea Lallukka
Jaana I Halonen
Børge Sivertsen
Jaana Pentti
Sari Stenholm
Marianna Virtanen
Paula Salo
Tuula Oksanen
Marko Elovainio
Jussi Vahtera
Mika Kivimäki
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Turku & Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2017 08 01; 46(4):1277-1284
Date
08-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - etiology - physiopathology
Social Justice
Surveys and Questionnaires
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
Despite injustice at the workplace being a potential source of sleep problems, longitudinal evidence remains scarce. We examined whether changes in perceived organizational justice predicted changes in insomnia symptoms.
Data on 24 287 Finnish public sector employees (82% women), from three consecutive survey waves between 2000 and 2012, were treated as 'pseudo-trials'. Thus, the analysis of unfavourable changes in organizational justice included participants without insomnia symptoms in Waves 1 and 2, with high organizational justice in Wave 1 and high or low justice in Wave 2 (N = 6307). In the analyses of favourable changes in justice, participants had insomnia symptoms in Waves 1 and 2, low justice in Wave 1 and high or low justice in Wave 2 (N = 2903). In both analyses, the outcome was insomnia symptoms in Wave 3. We used generalized estimating equation models to analyse the data.
After adjusting for social and health-related covariates in Wave 1, unfavourable changes in relational organizational justice (i.e. fairness of managerial behaviours) were associated with increased odds of developing insomnia symptoms [odds ratio = 1.15; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.30]. A favourable change in relational organizational justice was associated with lower odds of persistent insomnia symptoms (odds ratio = 0.83; 95% CI 0.71-0.96). Changes in procedural justice (i.e. the fairness of decision-making procedures) were not associated with insomnia symptoms.
These data suggest that changes in perceived relational justice may affect employees' sleep quality. Decreases in the fairness of managerial behaviours were linked to increases in insomnia symptoms, whereas rises in fairness were associated with reduced insomnia symptoms.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28065888 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of Social Networks and Mortality Risk: Evidence From 2 Prospective Cohort Studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300405
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2018 04 01; 187(4):746-753
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-01-2018
Author
Maarit Kauppi
Ichiro Kawachi
George David Batty
Tuula Oksanen
Marko Elovainio
Jaana Pentti
Ville Aalto
Marianna Virtanen
Markku Koskenvuo
Jussi Vahtera
Mika Kivimäki
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Turku and Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2018 04 01; 187(4):746-753
Date
04-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Social Networking
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The size of a person's social network is linked to health and longevity, but it is unclear whether the number of strong social ties or the number of weak social ties is most influential for health. We examined social network characteristics as predictors of mortality in the Finnish Public Sector Study (n = 7,617) and the Health and Social Support Study (n = 20,816). Social network characteristics were surveyed at baseline in 1998. Information about mortality was obtained from the Finnish National Death Registry. During a mean follow-up period of 16 years, participants with a small social network (=10 members) were more likely to die than those with a large social network (=21 members) (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 1.23, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04, 1.46). Mortality risk was increased among participants with both a small number of strong ties (=2 members) and a small number of weak ties (=5 members) (HR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.26, 1.79) and among participants with both a large number of strong ties and a small number of weak ties (HR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.52), but not among those with a small number of strong ties and a large number of weak ties (HR = 1.04, 95% CI: 0.87, 1.25). These findings suggest that in terms of mortality risk, the number of weak ties may be an important component of social networks.
PubMed ID
29020140 View in PubMed
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Childhood adversity, adult socioeconomic status and risk of work disability: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285311
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2017 Sep;74(9):659-666
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Jaana I Halonen
Mika Kivimäki
Jussi Vahtera
Jaana Pentti
Marianna Virtanen
Jenni Ervasti
Tuula Oksanen
Tea Lallukka
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2017 Sep;74(9):659-666
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Disabled Persons - psychology
Employment
Family Relations - psychology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - etiology
Mental health
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - etiology
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Pensions
Proportional Hazards Models
Retirement
Risk factors
Sick Leave
Social Class
Abstract
To examine the combined effects of childhood adversities and low adult socioeconomic status (SES) on the risk of future work disability.
Included were 34 384 employed Finnish Public Sector study participants who responded to questions about childhood adversities (none vs any adversity, eg, parental divorce or financial difficulties) in 2008, and whose adult SES in 2008 was available. We categorised exposure into four groups: neither (reference), childhood adversity only, low SES only or both. Participants were followed from 2009 until the first period of register-based work disability (sickness absence >9 days or disability pension) due to any cause, musculoskeletal or mental disorders; retirement; death or end of follow-up (December 2011). We ran Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for behavioural, health-related and work-related covariates, and calculated synergy indices for the combined effects.
When compared with those with neither exposure, HR for work disability from any cause was increased among participants with childhood adversity, with low SES, and those with both exposures. The highest hazard was observed in those with both exposures: HR 2.53, 95% CI 2.29?to 2.79 for musculoskeletal disability, 1.55, 95% CI 1.36?to 1.78 for disability due to mental disorders and 1.29, 95% CI 1.20?to 1.39 for disability due to other reasons. The synergy indices did not indicate synergistic effects.
These findings indicate that childhood psychosocial adversity and low adult SES are additive risk factors for work disability.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28784838 View in PubMed
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Chronic workplace stress and insufficient physical activity: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120339
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2013 Jan;70(1):3-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Anne Kouvonen
Jussi Vahtera
Tuula Oksanen
Jaana Pentti
Ari K P Väänänen
Tarja Heponiemi
Paula Salo
Marianna Virtanen
Mika Kivimäki
Author Affiliation
School of Sociology, Social Policy & Social Work, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK and Centre of Excellence for Public Health (NI), Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK. a.kouvonen@qub.ac.uk
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2013 Jan;70(1):3-8
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Employment
Exercise
Female
Finland
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Metabolic Equivalent
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Prospective Studies
Reward
Stress, Psychological - complications
Workplace
Abstract
To examine whether exposure to workplace stressors predicts changes in physical activity and the risk of insufficient physical activity.
Prospective data from the Finnish Public Sector Study. Repeated exposure to low job control, high job demands, low effort, low rewards and compositions of these (job strain and effort-reward imbalance) were assessed at Time 1 (2000-2002) and Time 2 (2004). Insufficient physical activity (
PubMed ID
23014593 View in PubMed
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Developing register-based measures for assessment of working time patterns for epidemiologic studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269586
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2015 May 1;41(3):268-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2015
Author
Mikko Härmä
Annina Ropponen
Tarja Hakola
Aki Koskinen
Päivi Vanttola
Sampsa Puttonen
Mikael Sallinen
Paula Salo
Tuula Oksanen
Jaana Pentti
Jussi Vahtera
Mika Kivimäki
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2015 May 1;41(3):268-79
Date
May-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff
Physicians
Registries
Workload
Abstract
Epidemiological studies suggest that long working hours and shift work may increase the risk of chronic diseases, but the "toxic" elements remain unclear due to crude assessment of working time patterns based on self-reports. In this methodological paper, we present and evaluate objective register-based algorithms for assessment of working time patterns and validate a method to retrieve standard payroll data on working hours from the employer electronic records.
Detailed working hour records from employers' registers were obtained for 12 391 nurses and physicians, a total 14.5 million separate work shifts from 2008-2013. We examined the quality and validity of the obtained register data and designed 29 algorithms characterizing four potentially health-relevant working time patterns: (i) length of the working hours; (ii) time of the day; (iii) shift intensity; and (iv) social aspects of the working hours.
The collection of the company-based register data was feasible and the retrieved data matched with the originally published shift plans. The transferred working time records included
PubMed ID
25788103 View in PubMed
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