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Adult respiratory outcomes of extreme preterm birth. A regional cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268379
Source
Ann Am Thorac Soc. 2015 Mar;12(3):313-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Maria Vollsæter
Hege H Clemm
Emma Satrell
Geir E Eide
Ola D Røksund
Trond Markestad
Thomas Halvorsen
Source
Ann Am Thorac Soc. 2015 Mar;12(3):313-22
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forced expiratory volume
Forecasting
Humans
Infant, Extremely Premature
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature, Diseases - epidemiology - physiopathology
Lung
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prognosis
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Retrospective Studies
Spirometry
Total lung capacity
Young Adult
Abstract
Lifetime respiratory function after extremely preterm birth (gestational age=28 wk or birth weight=1,000 g) is unknown.
To compare changes from 18-25 years of age in respiratory health, lung function, and airway responsiveness in young adults born extremely prematurely to that of term-born control subjects.
Comprehensive lung function investigations and interviews were conducted in a population-based sample of 25-year-old subjects born extremely prematurely in western Norway in 1982-1985, and in matched term-born control subjects. Comparison was made to similar data collected at 18 years of age.
At 25 years of age, 46/51 (90%) eligible subjects born extremely prematurely and 39/46 (85%) control subjects participated. z-Scores for FEV1, forced expiratory flow at 25-75% of vital capacity, and FEV1/FVC were significantly reduced in subjects born extremely prematurely by 1.02, 1.26, and 0.88, respectively, and airway resistance (kPa/L/s) was increased (0.23 versus 0.18). Residual volume to total lung capacity increased with severity of neonatal bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Responsiveness to methacholine (dose-response slope; 3.16 versus 0.85) and bronchial lability index (7.5 versus 4.8%) were increased in subjects born extremely prematurely. Lung function changes from 18 to 25 years and respiratory symptoms were similar in the prematurely born and term-born groups.
Lung function in early adult life was in the normal range in the majority of subjects born extremely prematurely, but methacholine responsiveness was more pronounced than in term-born young adults, suggesting a need for ongoing pulmonary monitoring in this population.
PubMed ID
25616079 View in PubMed
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The association of preterm birth with severe asthma and atopic dermatitis: a national cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105872
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2013 Dec;24(8):782-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Håvard Trønnes
Allen J Wilcox
Rolv Terje Lie
Trond Markestad
Dag Moster
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Department of Pediatrics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2013 Dec;24(8):782-7
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Asthma and atopic dermatitis are both regarded as atopic diseases. Being born too early is associated with increased risk of asthma, but some studies have indicated that the opposite might be true for atopic dermatitis. We explored in more detail the associations between preterm birth, asthma, and atopic dermatitis.
We analyzed data from Norwegian registries with prospectively collected data. All live births in Norway from 1967 through 2001 were followed through 2005 by linking the Medical Birth Registry of Norway to the National Insurance Scheme and to Statistics Norway. Only severe asthma and atopic dermatitis were registered in the National Insurance Scheme.
Of a total of 1,760,821 children, we identified 9,349 cases (0.5%) with severe asthma and 6,930 cases (0.4%) with severe atopic dermatitis. Compared with children born at term (37-41 wk gestation), preterm birth was associated with increased odds for severe asthma (odds ratio (OR) 1.7 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.6-1.8) for 32-36 wk gestation and OR 3.6 (95% CI: 3.1-4.2) for 23-31 wk) and decreased odds for severe atopic dermatitis (OR 0.9 (95% CI: 0.8-1.0) for 32-36 wk gestation and OR 0.7 (95% CI: 0.5-1.0) for 23-31 wk). Adjustment for perinatal and socio-demographic factors weakened the association between gestational age and severe asthma, while slightly strengthening the association between gestational age and severe atopic dermatitis.
Preterm birth was associated with increased risk of severe asthma and decreased risk of severe atopic dermatitis.
PubMed ID
24298940 View in PubMed
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Associations of maternal atopic diseases with adverse pregnancy outcomes: a national cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266507
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2014 Nov;28(6):489-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Håvard Trønnes
Allen J Wilcox
Trond Markestad
Mette Christophersen Tollånes
Rolv Terje Lie
Dag Moster
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2014 Nov;28(6):489-97
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Cohort Studies
Conjunctivitis, Allergic - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Meta-Analysis as Topic
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - immunology
Pregnancy outcome
Premature Birth - epidemiology - immunology
Prevalence
Registries
Rhinitis, Allergic - epidemiology
Risk
Seasons
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Abstract
Maternal asthma has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Little is known about the influence of other atopic diseases on pregnancy outcomes. We assessed how various maternal atopic diseases might affect preterm birth, stillbirth, and neonatal death.
By linking Norwegian national registries, we acquired information on maternal health, socio-demographic factors, pregnancy, birth, and neonatal outcome on all births in Norway from 1967 to 2003.
A total of 1?974?226 births were included. Of these, 1.8% had a record of maternal asthma, 3.4% of maternal atopic dermatitis, and 0.4% of maternal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. Overall rates of preterm birth, stillbirth, and neonatal death were 6.0%, 0.6%, and 0.5%, respectively. After adjustments for possible confounders, maternal asthma was associated with increased risk of preterm birth (relative risk (RR), 1.15, [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10, 1.21]). In contrast, maternal atopic dermatitis was associated with decreased risk of preterm birth (RR 0.90, [95% CI 0.86, 0.93]), stillbirth (RR 0.70, [95% CI 0.62, 0.79]), and neonatal death (RR 0.76, [95% CI 0.65, 0.90]). Similarly, maternal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis was associated with decreased risk of preterm birth (RR 0.84, [95% CI 0.76, 0.94]) and stillbirth (RR 0.40, [95% CI 0.25, 0.66]).
We confirmed the previously reported association of maternal asthma with increased risk for preterm birth. Unexpectedly, maternal atopic dermatitis and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis were associated with decreased risk of preterm birth and stillbirth. Mechanisms for these protective associations are unclear, and our findings require confirmation in further studies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25359226 View in PubMed
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Cerebral palsy among term and postterm births.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141089
Source
JAMA. 2010 Sep 1;304(9):976-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2010
Author
Dag Moster
Allen J Wilcox
Stein Emil Vollset
Trond Markestad
Rolv Terje Lie
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, PO Box 7804, N-5020 Bergen, Norway. Dag.Moster@smis.uib.no
Source
JAMA. 2010 Sep 1;304(9):976-82
Date
Sep-1-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk
Social Class
Abstract
Although preterm delivery is a well-established risk factor for cerebral palsy (CP), preterm deliveries contribute only a minority of affected infants. There is little information on the relation of CP risk to gestational age in the term range, where most CP occurs.
To determine whether timing of birth in the term and postterm period is associated with risk of CP.
Population-based follow-up study using the Medical Birth Registry of Norway to identify 1,682,441 singleton children born in the years 1967-2001 with a gestational age of 37 through 44 weeks and no congenital anomalies. The cohort was followed up through 2005 by linkage to other national registries.
Absolute and relative risk of CP for children surviving to at least 4 years of age.
Of the cohort of term and postterm children, 1938 were registered with CP in the National Insurance Scheme. Infants born at 40 weeks had the lowest risk of CP, with a prevalence of 0.99/1000 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90-1.08). Risk for CP was higher with earlier or later delivery, with a prevalence at 37 weeks of 1.91/1000 (95% CI, 1.58-2.25) and a relative risk (RR) of 1.9 (95% CI, 1.6-2.4), a prevalence at 38 weeks of 1.25/1000 (95% CI, 1.07-1.42) and an RR of 1.3 (95% CI, 1.1-1.6), a prevalence at 42 weeks of 1.36/1000 (95% CI, 1.19-1.53) and an RR of 1.4 (95% CI, 1.2-1.6), and a prevalence after 42 weeks of 1.44 (95% CI, 1.15-1.72) and an RR of 1.4 (95% CI, 1.1-1.8). These associations were even stronger in a subset with gestational age based on ultrasound measurements: at 37 weeks the prevalence was 1.17/1000 (95% CI, 0.30-2.04) and the relative risk was 3.7 (95% CI, 1.5-9.1). At 42 weeks the prevalence was 0.85/1000 (95% CI, 0.33-1.38) and the relative risk was 2.4 (95% CI, 1.1-5.3). Adjustment for infant sex, maternal age, and various socioeconomic measures had little effect.
Compared with delivery at 40 weeks' gestation, delivery at 37 or 38 weeks or at 42 weeks or later was associated with an increased risk of CP.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20810375 View in PubMed
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Children Born Preterm at the Turn of the Millennium Had Better Lung Function Than Children Born Similarly Preterm in the Early 1990s.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274022
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(12):e0144243
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Maria Vollsæter
Kaia Skromme
Emma Satrell
Hege Clemm
Ola Røksund
Knut Øymar
Trond Markestad
Thomas Halvorsen
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(12):e0144243
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant, Premature
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Norway
Premature Birth
Respiratory Function Tests
Abstract
Compare respiratory health in children born extremely preterm (EP) or with extremely low birthweight (ELBW) nearly one decade apart, hypothesizing that better perinatal management has led to better outcome.
Fifty-seven (93%) of 61 eligible 11-year old children born in Western Norway in 1999-2000 with gestational age (GA)
Notes
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PubMed ID
26641080 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Nov 20;123(22):3179
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-20-2003
Author
Trond Markestad
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Nov 20;123(22):3179
Date
Nov-20-2003
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Humans
Norway
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Resuscitation Orders
PubMed ID
14714002 View in PubMed
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Early death, morbidity, and need of treatment among extremely premature infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58170
Source
Pediatrics. 2005 May;115(5):1289-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Trond Markestad
Per Ivar Kaaresen
Arild Rønnestad
Hallvard Reigstad
Kristin Lossius
Sverre Medbø
Gro Zanussi
Inger Elise Engelund
Rolv Skjaerven
Lorentz M Irgens
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. trond.markestad@sykehuset-innlandet.no
Source
Pediatrics. 2005 May;115(5):1289-98
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Premature, Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Logistic Models
Male
Morbidity
Norway - epidemiology
Oxygen Inhalation Therapy
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration, Artificial
Retinopathy of Prematurity - classification - epidemiology
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Rate
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine outcomes, in terms of perinatal and early death, need for treatment, and morbidity at the time of discharge home, among extremely preterm infants. DESIGN: A prospective observational study of all infants with a gestational age (GA) of 22 to 27 completed weeks or a birth weight of 500 to 999 g who were born in Norway in 1999 and 2000. RESULTS: Of 636 births, 174 infants (27%) were stillborn or died in the delivery room, 86 (14%) died in the NICU, and 376 (59%) were discharged from the hospital. The risk of being registered as stillborn or not being resuscitated increased with decreasing GA below 25 weeks. The survival rates for all births and for infants admitted to a NICU were, respectively, 0% for 27 weeks. For the survivors, days of mechanical ventilation decreased from a median of 37 days to 3 days and the proportion in need of oxygen at 36 weeks' postconceptional age decreased from 67% to 26% at 23 and 27 weeks' GA, respectively. At 40 weeks' postconceptional age, the respective figures were 11% and 6%. The proportion with retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) requiring treatment decreased from 33% for GA of 23 weeks to 0% for >25 weeks. Periventricular hemorrhage of more than grade 2 occurred for 6% of the survivors and significant periventricular leukomalacia occurred for 5%, with no significant association with GA. The proportion of survivors without severe neurosensory or pulmonary morbidity increased from 44% for 23 weeks' to 86% for 27 weeks' GA. Apart from ROP, the morbidity rate was not associated with GA. CONCLUSIONS: The survival rate was high and the morbidity rate at discharge home was low in the present study, compared with previous population-based studies. With the exception of ROP, the morbidity rates among the survivors were not higher at the lowest GAs, possibly because withholding treatment was considered more acceptable for the most immature infants. The need for intensive care increased markedly for survivors with the lowest GAs.
PubMed ID
15867037 View in PubMed
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Evaluating iron status and the risk of anemia in young infants using erythrocyte parameters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118789
Source
Pediatr Res. 2013 Feb;73(2):214-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Ingrid Kristin Torsvik
Trond Markestad
Per Magne Ueland
Roy M Nilsen
Oivind Midttun
Anne-Lise Bjørke Monsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. idto@helse-bergen.no
Source
Pediatr Res. 2013 Feb;73(2):214-20
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - etiology
Biological Markers - blood
Birth weight
Breast Feeding
Chi-Square Distribution
Dietary Supplements
Erythrocyte Count
Erythrocyte Indices
Erythrocytes - drug effects - metabolism
Erythropoiesis - drug effects
Female
Ferrous Compounds - therapeutic use
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Infant
Infant, Low Birth Weight - blood
Infant, Newborn
Iron - blood
Male
Nonlinear Dynamics
Norway
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Reticulocytes - metabolism
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Weight Gain
Abstract
Correct evaluation of iron status is important in young infants because both iron deficiency and excess may have negative effects on development, growth, and morbidity.
We evaluated iron status using erythrocyte parameters, including reticulocyte hemoglobin content (CHr) in infants with birth weight
PubMed ID
23168578 View in PubMed
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Foetal umbilical artery Doppler in small preterms: (IQ) neurocognitive outcome at 5 years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117134
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2013 Apr;102(4):403-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Siw Helen W Eger
Kristian Sommerfelt
Torvid Kiserud
Trond Markestad
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. helen@westbyeger.no
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2013 Apr;102(4):403-9
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - etiology
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Live Birth
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Neuroimaging
Neurologic Examination
Norway
Pre-Eclampsia
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Retrospective Studies
Time
Ultrasonography, Doppler
Ultrasonography, Prenatal
Umbilical Arteries - ultrasonography
Abstract
To investigate whether absent or reversed end-diastolic flow in the umbilical artery (AREDF) is associated with neonatal mortality, morbidity or long-term neurocognitive outcome in extremely preterm infants exposed to preeclampsia or intrauterine growth restriction.
Prenatal Doppler data were retrospectively collected for liveborn infants with gestational age (GA)
PubMed ID
23331087 View in PubMed
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Health related quality of life after extremely preterm birth: a matched controlled cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96885
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2010;8:53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Bente J Vederhus
Trond Markestad
Geir E Eide
Marit Graue
Thomas Halvorsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. bente.vederhus@helse-bergen.no
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2010;8:53
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The majority of infants born before the last trimester now grow up. However, knowledge on subsequent health related quality of life (HRQoL) is scarce. We therefore aimed to compare HRQoL in children born extremely preterm with control children born at term. Furthermore, we assessed HRQoL in relation to perinatal and neonatal morbidity and to current clinical and sociodemographic characteristics. METHOD: The Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ-PF50) and a general questionnaire were applied in a population based cohort of 10 year old children born at gestational age
PubMed ID
20492724 View in PubMed
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37 records – page 1 of 4.