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Complementary and conventional providers in cancer care: experience of communication with patients and steps to improve communication with other providers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285203
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2017 Jun 08;17(1):301
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-08-2017
Author
Trine Stub
Sara A Quandt
Thomas A Arcury
Joanne C Sandberg
Agnete E Kristoffersen
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2017 Jun 08;17(1):301
Date
Jun-08-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Therapy - psychology
Adult
Communication
Complementary Therapies - manpower
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Massage - manpower - psychology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Norway
Patients - psychology
Abstract
Effective interdisciplinary communication is important to achieve better quality in health care. The aims of this study were to compare conventional and complementary providers' experience of communication about complementary therapies and conventional medicine with their cancer patients, and to investigate how they experience interdisciplinary communication and cooperation.
This study analyzed data from a self-administrated questionnaire. A total of 606 different health care providers, from four counties in Norway, completed the questionnaire. The survey was developed to describe aspects of the communication pattern among oncology doctors, nurses, family physicians and complementary therapists (acupuncturists, massage therapists and reflexologists/zone-therapists). Between-group differences were analyzed using chi-square, ANOVA and Fisher's exact tests. Significance level was defined as p 
Notes
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Cites: Health Serv Res. 2013 Jun;48(3):913-3023046097
Cites: Integr Cancer Ther. 2015 Nov;14(6):515-2426069277
PubMed ID
28595577 View in PubMed
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Conventional and complementary cancer treatments: where do conventional and complementary providers seek information about these modalities?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297461
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 Nov 14; 18(1):854
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-14-2018
Author
Trine Stub
Sara A Quandt
Thomas A Arcury
Joanne C Sandberg
Agnete E Kristoffersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Sykehusveien 21, 9037, Tromsø, Norway. trine.stub@uit.no.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 Nov 14; 18(1):854
Date
Nov-14-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Complementary Therapies - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Information Seeking Behavior
Male
Medical Informatics - statistics & numerical data
Medical Oncology - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - therapy
Norway
Physicians, Family - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Both conventional health care providers and complementary therapists treat cancer patients. To provide effective treatment, both types of providers should to be familiar with their own as well as alternative types of treatment. Our aim was to compare how conventional health care providers (oncology doctors, oncology nurses, family physicians) and complementary therapists (acupuncturists, reflexologists, massage therapists) seek information about conventional and complementary cancer treatments.
This analysis was conducted on the basis of feedback from 466 participants. We used self-administered questionnaires in a cross-sectional study.
The majority of the medical doctors (96%) searched for evidence-based information regarding conventional cancer treatments. They gathered this information mostly from guidelines, which is considered best practice and is expected from Norwegian health personnel. Eighty-one percent of the nurses gather this information from evidence based resources such as UpToDate. Colleagues were asked for information by 58% of the medical doctors and 64% of the nurses. Moreover, 50% of the medical doctors and 57% of the nurses searched for evidence-based information about complementary cancer modalities. The acupuncturists gathered evidence-based information for both conventional (79%) and complementary (77%) modalities, followed by the reflexologists (54 and 54%, respectively) and massage therapists (54 and 52%, respectively). Nearly half of the acupuncturist (49%) asked a colleague for information.
To provide safe cancer care, it is important that advice about complementary modalities is based on current and evidence-based evaluations. The majority of the medical doctors and nurses in this study sought information according to evidence-based medicine regarding conventional cancer treatments, and about half of them gathered evidence-based information about complementary cancer modalities. This was also true for the complementary therapists as they gathered information about complementary and conventional treatments from evidence-based evaluations. This demonstrates that since the term evidence-based medicine was first introduced in 1991, the approach has grown extensively and both conventional and complementary providers use this approach to seek information.
PubMed ID
30428878 View in PubMed
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Gender differences in prevalence and associations for use of CAM in a large population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258436
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2014;14(1):463
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Agnete E Kristoffersen
Trine Stub
Anita Salamonsen
Frauke Musial
Katarina Hamberg
Author Affiliation
The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. agnete.kristoffersen@uit.no.
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2014;14(1):463
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Self-reported use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) varies widely from 10% to 75% in the general populations worldwide. When limited to use of a CAM provider 2% to 49% reported use is found. CAM use is believed to be closely associated with socio demographic variables such as gender, age, education, income and health complaints. However, studies have only occasionally differentiated CAM use according to gender. Therefore, the aim of the study presented here is to describe the prevalence of CAM use on the background of gender and to describe the specific characteristics of male and female users in the total Tromsø 6 population.
A total of 12,982 men and women aged 30-87 in the municipality of Tromsø, Norway went through a health screening program and completed two self-administered questionnaires in 2007/2008. The questionnaires were developed specifically for the Tromsø study and included questions about life style and health issues in addition to socio demographic variables.
A total of 33% of the participants reported use of any CAM within the last 12 months, women more often than men (42% and 24%, respectively). When limited to visits to a CAM provider, we found 17% use among women and 8% among men. The relationship between the demographic variables and being a CAM user differed significantly between men and women with regard to age, household income, and marital status. We did not find significant differences between men and women concerning education and self-reported health.
Findings from this study suggest that the prevalence and associations for use of CAM differ between men and women concerning several socio demographic variables (age, education and household income). Neglect of women's health care needs in public health care may contribute to the fact that women to a higher degree than men turn to CAM and CAM products.
PubMed ID
25465676 View in PubMed
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Is it possible to distinguish homeopathic aggravation from adverse effects? A qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126331
Source
Forsch Komplementmed. 2012;19(1):13-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Trine Stub
Anita Salamonsen
Terje Alraek
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), University of Tromsø, Norway. trine.stub@uit.no
Source
Forsch Komplementmed. 2012;19(1):13-9
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Homeopathy - adverse effects - standards
Humans
Male
Norway
Safety
Abstract
Homeopathic aggravation is a temporary worsening of existing symptoms following the administration of a correct homeopathic prescription. The aim of this study was to explore and compose criteria that may differentiate homeopathic aggravations from adverse effects.
A qualitative approach was employed using focus group interviews. 2 interviews, with 11 experienced homeopaths, were performed in Oslo, Norway. The practitioners have practiced classical homeopathy over a period of 10-32 years. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the text data. The codes were defined before and during the data analysis.
We found that aggravations were subtle and multifaceted events. Moreover, highly skilled homeopaths are required to identify and report aggravations. Adverse effect may be defined as an 'undesirable effect of a remedy'. This definition is pragmatic, flexible, and more in line with the holistic paradigm that the homeopaths represent. 8 criteria that distinguish aggravation from adverse effect were found. Highly sensitive persons hold a unique position regarding safety, as it is important to identify these patients in order to treat them correctly and avoid undesirable effects of the treatment.
This study rigorously explored homeopaths' views and experience on aggravation and adverse effects. The 8 criteria developed in this study may ensure patient safety and support therapists in identifying an 'undesirable effect of a remedy'.
PubMed ID
22398921 View in PubMed
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Mapping the risk perception and communication gap between different professions of healthcare providers in cancer care: a cross-sectional protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273711
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(9):e008236
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Trine Stub
Frauke Musial
Sara A Quandt
Thomas A Arcury
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Kristoffersen
Gro Berntsen
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(9):e008236
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Cross-Sectional Studies
Decision Making
Health Personnel - organization & administration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Neoplasms - therapy
Norway
Patient Participation
Perception
Risk Assessment - methods
Time Factors
Abstract
Studies show that patients with cancer who use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) have a poorer survival prognosis than those who do not. It remains unclear whether this is due to a priori poorer prognosis that makes patients turn to CAM, or whether there is a factor associated with CAM use itself that influences the prognosis negatively. Healthcare providers should assist patients in safeguarding their treatment decision. However, the current non-communication between CAM and conventional providers leaves it up to the patients themselves to choose how to best integrate the two worlds of therapy. In this study, an interactive shared decision-making (SDM) tool will be developed to enable patients and health professionals to make safe health choices.
We will delineate, compare and evaluate perception and clinical experience of communication of risk situations among oncology experts, general practitioners and CAM practitioners. To accomplish this, we will develop a pilot and implement a large-scale survey among the aforementioned health professionals in Norway. Guided by the survey results, we will develop a ß-version of a shared decision-making tool for healthcare providers to use in guiding patients to make safe CAM decisions.
Participants must give their informed and written consent before inclusion. They will be informed about the opportunity to drop out from the study followed by deletion of all data registered. The study needs no approval from The Regional Committee for Medical and Health Research Ethics because all participants are healthcare professionals. Results from this study will be disseminated in peer-reviewed medical journals.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26338839 View in PubMed
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"Placebo effect is probably what we refer to as patient healing power": A qualitative pilot study examining how Norwegian complementary therapists reflect on their practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285206
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2017 May 12;17(1):262
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-12-2017
Author
Trine Stub
Nina Foss
Ingrid Liodden
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2017 May 12;17(1):262
Date
May-12-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Complementary Therapies - manpower - psychology
Emotions
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patients - psychology
Pilot Projects
Placebo Effect
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Abstract
Complementary therapists spend considerable time with their patients, especially in the first consultation. The communication between patients and their therapists is important for raising consciousness and activation of the patient's self-healing power. Thus, the aims in this study were to delineate what complementary therapists regard as essential in patient consultations, their view of the healing process, and how the therapists understand the placebo effect and its position in the healing process.
Semi-structured individual interviews (n = 4), focus group interview (n = 1) and participant observation were conducted among four different complementary therapists in a Norwegian community. The text data was transcribed verbatim and the analysis of the material was conducted according to conventional and direct content analysis. Some codes were predefined and others were defined during the analysis.
The pilot study showed that the implemented methods seems feasible and fit well with the aims of this study. Complementary therapists (chiropractor, naprapath (musculoskeletal therapist), acupuncturist and acupuncturist/homeopath) representing four different complementary modalities participated. A combination of the conversation and examination during the first consultation formed the basis for the therapist's choice of treatment. A successful consultation was characterized by a fruitful relationship between the therapist and the patient. Moreover, the therapist needs to be humble and show the patient respect. Patients' positive beliefs and expectations about the treatment play a significant role in the healing process. The more hope the therapist can bring about, the more easily the patient can start believing that it is possible to get well.
This was a pilot study. Therefore the findings should be appreciated as limited and preliminary. Therapists' and patients' mutual understanding and treatment goals were essential for a successful consultation. The therapists emphasized their professional skills and therapeutic competence as important when building fruitful relationships with their patients. Exerting authority and making the patient feel confident were essential factors for a successful healing process. The complementary therapists understood the placebo effect as the patient's self-healing power, resulting from establishing trust and belief in the treatment process.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28499371 View in PubMed
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Prevalence and associations for use of a traditional medicine provider in the SAMINOR 1 Survey: a population-based study on Health and Living Conditions in Regions with Sami and Norwegian Populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287589
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2017 Dec 12;17(1):530
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-12-2017
Author
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Trine Stub
Marita Melhus
Ann Ragnhild Broderstad
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2017 Dec 12;17(1):530
Date
Dec-12-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
In Northern Norway, traditional medicine (TM) is shaped by both Christianity and traditional Sami nature worship. The healing rituals may include prayer and the use of tools such as moss, water, stones, wool and soil. Examples of TM modalities offered is cupping, blood-stemming, laying on of hands, healing prayers, and rituals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of the use of TM in areas with predominantly Sami and Norwegian populations, and the influence of ethnicity, geography, gender, age, education, household income, religiosity and self-reported health on such use.
The study is based on data collected in the first SAMINOR Survey (SAMINOR 1) conducted in 2003/2004, including three self-administered questionnaires, clinical measures, and blood analyses. Data was collected in 24 municipalities in Norway known to have a substantial population of Sami. All residents aged 30 and 36-78/79 years in the predefined regions were invited regardless of ethnic background (N?=?27,987). Of these, 16,865 (60.3%) accepted to participate and gave their consent to medical research.
Of the 16,544 people responding to the question about TM use, 2276 (13.8%) reported to have used TM once or more during their lifetime. The most outstanding characteristic of the TM users was the affiliation to the Laestadian church, where 34.3% (n?=?273) reported such use, followed by an inner Finnmark residence (31.1%, n?=?481) and a Sami ethnicity (25.7%, n?=?1014). Women were slightly more likely to use TM compared to men (15.9% and 11.5% accordingly, p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
29233186 View in PubMed
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Prevalence and predictors of complementary and alternative medicine use among people with coronary heart disease or at risk for this in the sixth Tromsø study: a comparative analysis using protection motivation theory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283381
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2017 Jun 19;17(1):324
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-19-2017
Author
Agnete E Kristoffersen
Fuschia M Sirois
Trine Stub
Anne Helen Hansen
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2017 Jun 19;17(1):324
Date
Jun-19-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Engagement in healthy lifestyle behaviors, such as healthy diet and regular physical activity, are known to reduce the risk of developing coronary heart disease (CHD). Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is known to be associated with having a healthy lifestyle. The primary aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and predictors of CAM use in CHD patients, and in those without CHD but at risk for developing CHD, using Protection Motivation Theory (PMT) as a guiding conceptual framework.
Questionnaire data were collected from 12,981 adult participants in the cross-sectional sixth Tromsø Study (2007-8). Eligible for analyses were 11,103 participants who reported whether they had used CAM or not. Of those, 830 participants reported to have or have had CHD (CHD group), 4830 reported to have parents, children or siblings with CHD (no CHD but family risk), while 5443 reported no CHD nor family risk of CHD. We first compared the patterns of CAM use in each group, and then examined the PMT predictors of CAM use. Health vulnerability from the threat appraisal process of PMT was assessed by self-rated health and expectations for future health. Response efficacy from the coping appraisal process of PMT was assessed as preventive health beliefs and health behavior frequency.
Use of CAM was most commonly seen in people with no CHD themselves, but family risk of developing CHD (35.8%), compared to people already diagnosed with CHD (30.2%) and people with no CHD nor family risk (32.1%). All four of the PMT factors; self-rated health, expectations for future health, preventive health beliefs, and the health behavior index - were predictors for CAM use in the no CHD but family risk group.
These findings suggest that people use CAM in response to a perceived risk of developing CHD, and to prevent disease and to maintain health.
PubMed ID
28629411 View in PubMed
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Prevalence and reasons for intentional use of complementary and alternative medicine as an adjunct to future visits to a medical doctor for chronic disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291118
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2018 Mar 27; 18(1):109
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-27-2018
Author
Agnete E Kristoffersen
Trine Stub
Frauke Musial
Vinjar Fønnebø
Ola Lillenes
Arne Johan Norheim
Author Affiliation
The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. agnete.kristoffersen@uit.no.
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2018 Mar 27; 18(1):109
Date
Mar-27-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care - psychology
Attitude to Health
Chronic Disease - psychology - therapy
Complementary Therapies - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Prevalence
Young Adult
Abstract
Intentional use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has previously only been researched in small, possibly biased, samples. There seems to be a lack of scientific information regarding healthy individual's attitudes and presumed use of CAM. The aim of this study is to describe prevalence and characteristics of participants who intend to see a CAM provider compared to participants who intend to see a medical doctor (MD) only when suffering from a chronic, non- life-threatening disease and in the need of treatment. Further to describe differences between the groups regarding expected reasons for CAM use and expected skills of CAM providers.
The survey was conducted in January 2016 as part of the "TNS Gallup Health policy Barometer". In total, 1728 individuals aged 16-92 years participated in the study, constituting an overall response rate of 47%. The survey included questions regarding opinions and attitudes towards health, health services and health politics in Norway.
The majority of the participants (90.2%) would see a MD only if they were suffering from a chronic, non- life-threatening disease and were in the need of treatment. Men over the age of 60 with a university education tended to see a MD only. Only 9.8% of all respondents would in addition visit a CAM provider. Being an intentional user of a MD?+?CAM provider was associated with being a woman under the age of 60. The respondents believed that CAM providers have professional competence based on formal training in CAM. They also believed that individuals seeing a CAM provider have poor health and are driven by the hope of being cured. Further, that they have heard that others have good experience with such treatment.
Intentional use of CAM is associated with positive attitudes, trustworthiness, and presumed positive experiences in the CAM-patient-setting. Intentional CAM users also have the impression that CAM providers have professional competence based on formal training in alternative therapies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29580283 View in PubMed
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The Red flag! risk assessment among medical homeopaths in Norway: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120812
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2012;12:150
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Trine Stub
Terje Alraek
Anita Salamonsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. trine.stub@uit.no
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2012;12:150
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Homeopathy - adverse effects - methods - standards
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Safety
Physicians - psychology
Qualitative Research
Risk assessment
Abstract
Homeopathy is widely used, and many European physicians practice homeopathy in addition to conventional medicine. Adverse effects in homeopathy are not expected by homeopaths due to the negligible quantities of active substances in a remedy. However, we questioned if homeopathic aggravation, which is described as a temporary worsening of existing symptoms following a correct homeopathic remedy, should be regarded as adverse effects or ruled out as desirable events of the treatment. In order to improve knowledge in an unexplored area of patient safety, we explored how medical homeopath discriminate between homeopathic aggravations and adverse effects, and how they assessed patient safety in medical practice.
A qualitative approach was employed using focus group interviews. Two interviews with seven medical homeopaths were performed in Oslo, Norway. The participants practiced homeopathy besides conventional medicine. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the text data. The codes were defined before and during the data analysis.
According to the medical homeopaths, a feeling of well-being may be a criterion to distinguish homeopathic aggravations from adverse effects. There was disagreement among the participants whether or not homeopathic treatment produced adverse effects. However, they agreed when an incorrect remedy was administrated, it may create a disruption or suppressive reaction in the patient. This was not perceived as adverse effects but a possibility to prescribe a new remedy as new symptoms emerge. This study revealed several advantages for the patients as the medical homeopaths looked for dangerous symptoms which may enhance safety. The patient was given time and space, which enabled the practitioner to see the complete picture. A more comprehensive toolkit gave the medical homeopaths a feeling of professionalism.
This explorative study investigated how Medical Homeopaths understood and assessed risk in their clinical practice. A feeling of well-being emerging soon after taking the remedy was the most important criterion for discriminating between Homeopathic Aggravations and Adverse Effects in clinical practice. The Medical Homeopaths used the view of both professions and always looked for red flag situations in the consultation room. They combined knowledge from two treatment systems which may have advantages for the patient. These tentative results deserve further research efforts to improve patient safety among users of homeopathy. For further research we find it important to improve and develop concepts that are unique to homeopathy in order to validate and modernize this medical practice.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22967054 View in PubMed
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