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22 records – page 1 of 3.

[An outbreak of tinea capitis in a child care center]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31178
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Dec 2;164(49):5814-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2-2002
Author
Merete Haedersdal
Jørgen Stenderup
Bente Møller
Tove Agner
Else Lyngsøe Svejgaard
Author Affiliation
Dermatologisk afdeling, Amtssygehuset i Gentofte. mhaedersdal@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Dec 2;164(49):5814-6
Date
Dec-2-2002
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Tinea Capitis - drug therapy - epidemiology - transmission
Abstract
We describe an outbreak of tinea capitis in a kindergarten. Individuals with relation to the institution were examined clinically and mycologically (n = 98). Microsporum audouinii was cultured from 12 people, out of whom eight patients had tinea capitis and seven patients had tinea corporis. Three patients had both tinea capitis and tinea corporis. The problems with spread of anthropophilic infections and the difficulties with treatment of Microsporum dermatophytes are discussed.
PubMed ID
12523227 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ceramides and barrier function in healthy skin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142635
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2010 Jul;90(4):350-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Jakob Mutanu Jungersted
Lars I Hellgren
Julie K Høgh
T. Drachmann
Gregor B E Jemec
Tove Agner
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, University of Copenhagen, Roskilde Hospital, Roskilde, Denmark. Jungersted@gmail.com
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2010 Jul;90(4):350-3
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ceramides - metabolism
Cholesterol - metabolism
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Permeability
Questionnaires
Skin - metabolism
Skin Absorption
Water Loss, Insensible
Young Adult
Abstract
Lipids in the stratum corneum are key components in the barrier function of the skin. Changes in lipid composition related to eczematous diseases are well known, but limited data are available on variations within healthy skin. The objective of the present study was to compare ceramide subgroups and ceramide/cholesterol ratios in young, old, male and female healthy skin. A total of 55 participants with healthy skin was included in the study. Lipid profiles were correlated with transepidermal water loss and with information on dry skin from a questionnaire including 16 people. No statistically significant differences were found between young and old skin for ceramide subgroups or ceramide/cholesterol ratios, and there was no statistically significant correlation between answers about dry skin and ceramide levels. Interestingly, a statistically significant higher ceramide/cholesterol ratio was found for men than for women (p = 0.02).
PubMed ID
20574598 View in PubMed
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Contact allergy to common ingredients in hair dyes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112944
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2013 Jul;69(1):32-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Heidi Søsted
Thomas Rustemeyer
Margarida Gonçalo
Magnus Bruze
An Goossens
Ana M Giménez-Arnau
Christophe J Le Coz
Ian R White
Thomas L Diepgen
Klaus E Andersen
Tove Agner
Howard Maibach
Torkil Menné
Jeanne D Johansen
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Hairdressers and Beauticians, Department of Dermato-Allergology, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Hellerup, Denmark. heidi.soested@regionh.dk
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2013 Jul;69(1):32-9
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Topical
Adult
Coloring Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Hair Dyes - adverse effects - chemistry
Humans
Male
Patch Tests - statistics & numerical data
Phenylenediamines - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Prevalence
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
p-Phenylenediamine (PPD) is the primary patch test screening agent for hair dye contact allergy, and approximately 100 different hair dye chemicals are allowed.
To examine whether PPD is an optimal screening agent for diagnosing hair dye allergy or whether other clinically important sensitizers exist.
Two thousand nine hundred and thirty-nine consecutive patients in 12 dermatology clinics were patch tested with five hair dyes available from patch test suppliers. Furthermore, 22 frequently used hair dye ingredients not available from patch test suppliers were tested in subgroups of ~500 patients each.
A positive reaction to PPD was found in 4.5% of patients, and 2.8% reacted to toluene-2,5-diamine (PTD), 1.8% to p-aminophenol, 1% to m-aminophenol, and 0.1% to resorcinol; all together, 5.3% (n = 156). Dying hair was the most frequently reported cause of the allergy (55.4%); so-called 'temporary henna' tattoos were the cause in 8.5% of the cases. p-Methylaminophenol gave a reaction in 20 patients (2.2%), 3 of them with clinical relevance, and no co-reaction with the above five well-known hair dyes.
Hair dyes are the prime cause of PPD allergy. PPD identifies the majority of positive reactions to PTD, p-aminophenol and m-aminophenol, but not all, which justifies additional testing with hair dye ingredients from the used product.
PubMed ID
23782356 View in PubMed
Less detail

Decreasing trends in methyldibromo glutaronitrile contact allergy--following regulatory intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156817
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2008 Jul;59(1):48-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Jeanne D Johansen
Niels Veien
Grete Laurberg
Christian Avnstorp
Knud Kaaber
Klaus E Andersen
Evy Paulsen
Mette Sommerlund
Jens Thormann
Niels H Nielsen
Susanne Vissing
Ove Kristensen
Berit Kristensen
Tove Agner
Torkil Menné
Author Affiliation
National Allergy Research Centre, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, 2900 Hellerup, Denmark. jedu@geh.regionh.dk
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2008 Jul;59(1):48-51
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Consumer Product Safety - legislation & jurisprudence
Cosmetics - adverse effects - chemistry
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Environmental Exposure - legislation & jurisprudence
European Union
Female
Government Regulation
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nitriles - adverse effects
Patch Tests
Population Surveillance
Predictive value of tests
Preservatives, Pharmaceutical - adverse effects
Prevalence
Abstract
The preservative methyldibromo glutaronitrile (MDBGN) has been banned, first from stay-on, and later from rinse-off cosmetics, in the EU countries because of increasing rates of contact allergy.
To evaluate the frequency of contact allergy to MDBGN among patients patch tested by the Danish Contact Dermatitis Group just before and following regulatory decisions.
The data set comprised 19 279 consecutive eczema patients patch tested from 2003-2007 with MDBGN 0.3% in petrolatum (pet.) or, in a minority of patients, with Euxyl K 400 1.5% in pet.
A significantly decreasing trend in the frequency of positive patch tests to MDBGN was found from 4.6% in 2003 to 2.6% in 2007 (P
PubMed ID
18537990 View in PubMed
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Development of atopic dermatitis during the first 3 years of life: the Copenhagen prospective study on asthma in childhood cohort study in high-risk children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76115
Source
Arch Dermatol. 2006 May;142(5):561-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Liselotte Brydensholt Halkjaer
Lotte Loland
Frederik F Buchvald
Tove Agner
Lone Skov
Matthew Strand
Hans Bisgaard
Author Affiliation
Danish Pediatric Asthma Centre, Department of Pediatrics, Copenhagen University Hospital, Gentofte, Denmark.
Source
Arch Dermatol. 2006 May;142(5):561-6
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To describe the development of atopic dermatitis (AD) during the first 3 years of life and identify the localization of the early skin lesions that predicts the development of AD. DESIGN: Prospective, longitudinal, birth cohort study of children born to mothers with a history of asthma, followed up for 3 years with scheduled visits every 6 months as well as visits for onset or acute exacerbations of skin symptoms. SETTING: The cohort was recruited from greater Copenhagen, Denmark, and followed up at a clinical research unit, which controlled all diagnoses and treatment of skin diseases. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 411 infants were enrolled in the cohort; 55 had incomplete follow-up and were excluded from certain analyses. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Atopic dermatitis was defined based on the criteria of Hanifin and Rajka, and severity was assessed by the SCORAD (Scoring Atopic Dermatitis) index. Predictive odds ratios of early skin lesions for those who developed AD vs those who did not were calculated. RESULTS: The cumulative incidence of AD by age 3 years was 44% (155/356). The prevalence rate peaked at age 2 years for boys and at age 2.5 years for girls, but there were no other sex differences in the proportion of children developing AD. Skin involvement in infants with AD was found to begin at the scalp, forehead, ear, and neck in a balaclava-like pattern and continue to the extensor sides and trunk, finally affecting the flexor sides of the extremities. Early skin lesions of arms and joints best predicted AD at age 3 years. CONCLUSIONS: Atopic dermatitis begins at the scalp, forehead, ear, and neck in a balaclava-like pattern. Eczema at the arms and joints provides the highest predictive value for the development of AD at age 3 years. This may be used for early prediction and intervention of AD.
PubMed ID
16702493 View in PubMed
Less detail

Difficulties in avoiding exposure to allergens in cosmetics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162477
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2007 Aug;57(2):105-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Eline Noiesen
Martin D Munk
Kristian Larsen
Jeanne Duus Johansen
Tove Agner
Author Affiliation
National Allergy Research Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, 2820 Gentofte, Denmark.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2007 Aug;57(2):105-9
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Allergens - adverse effects
Cosmetics - adverse effects
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology - pathology - prevention & control
Drug Labeling
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
The aim of the study is to describe the ability of patients with allergic contact dermatitis to avoid exposure to allergens in cosmetics. The study is a questionnaire survey among 382 patients with contact allergy to preservatives and fragrances, included from 3 dermatological clinics. The questionnaire included questions about the level of difficulty in reading labels of ingredients on cosmetics and about patients' strategies to avoid substances they were allergic to. It also included questions about eczema severity as well as about educational level. 46% of the patients found it difficult or extremely difficult to read the ingredient labelling of cosmetics, and this finding was significantly related to low educational level. Patients allergic to formaldehyde and methyldibromo glutaronitrile experienced the worst difficulties, while patients with fragrance allergy found ingredient label reading easier than patients with preservative allergy. Reading of ingredient labels is a major problem for patients with contact allergy to allergens in consumer products. It is a general problem for all patients and not restricted to a small group with multiple allergies.
PubMed ID
17627650 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evidence-based training as primary prevention of hand eczema in a population of hospital cleaning workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264666
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2015 Jan;72(1):47-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Kim K B Clemmensen
Ingelise Randbøll
Malene F Ryborg
Niels E Ebbehøj
Tove Agner
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2015 Jan;72(1):47-54
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Dermatitis, Contact - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology - prevention & control
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Inservice training
Male
Middle Aged
Personnel, Hospital
Primary prevention - methods
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Abstract
Skin disorders accounted for one third of all recognised occupational diseases in Denmark in 2010. Wet work is a risk factor for the development of occupational hand eczema. The consequences of occupational hand eczema include sick leave, loss of job and impaired quality of life.
The aim of the present study was to investigate exposures related to cleaning and the effect of an evidence-based educational intervention on the prevention of hand eczema among hospital cleaners.
The intervention consisted of a 1?hr course in hand protective behaviour. All full-time cleaners working at Bispebjerg Hospital in January 2013 were invited to participate. The outcome measures were self-reported skin behaviour, exposures, knowledge of skin protection and hand eczema severity index (HECSI).
One hundred and five cleaners were invited to participate, of these 86 (82%) were included. At follow-up after 3?months there was a shift towards fewer daily hand washings and hand disinfections (p?
PubMed ID
25236379 View in PubMed
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Hand eczema: prevalence and risk factors of hand eczema in a population of 2274 healthcare workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124092
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2012 Oct;67(4):200-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Kristina S Ibler
Gregor B E Jemec
Mari-Ann Flyvholm
Thomas L Diepgen
Askel Jensen
Tove Agner
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Roskilde Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. kristinaibler@hotmail.com
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2012 Oct;67(4):200-7
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology
Eczema - epidemiology
Female
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology
Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Skin pigmentation
Abstract
Healthcare workers are at increased risk of developing hand eczema.
To investigate the prevalence and severity of self-reported hand eczema, and to relate the findings to demographic data, occupation, medical speciality, wards, shifts, and working hours.
A survey of 3181 healthcare workers was performed. Data were analysed with logistic regression. Data on sick leave and notification to the authorities were obtained.
The response rate was 71% (2274 of 3181). The 1-year prevalence of hand eczema was 21%, and was positively associated with atopic dermatitis, younger age, male sex (male doctors), and working hours. Eighty nine per cent of subjects reported mild/moderate lesions. Atopic dermatitis was the only factor significantly related to severity. Sick leave was reported by 8% of subjects, and notification to the authorities by 12%.
The 21% prevalence of hand eczema in healthcare workers is double the prevalence in the background population. Eleven per cent of hand eczema patients reported severe/very severe eczema. No significant differences were found between professions or medical specialities with respect to prevalence or severity, but cultural differences between professions with respect to coping with the eczema were significant. Atopic dermatitis was related to increased prevalence and severity, and preventive efforts should be made for healthcare workers with atopic dermatitis.
PubMed ID
22624885 View in PubMed
Less detail

The influence of probiotics for preterm neonates on the incidence of atopic dermatitis-results from a historically controlled cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282042
Source
Arch Dermatol Res. 2017 May;309(4):259-264
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Julie A Damm
Birgitte Smith
Gorm Greisen
Karen A Krogfelt
Maja-Lisa Clausen
Tove Agner
Source
Arch Dermatol Res. 2017 May;309(4):259-264
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - diet therapy - epidemiology
Dietary Supplements
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Premature
Male
Premature Birth - diet therapy - epidemiology
Prevalence
Probiotics - therapeutic use
Abstract
Probiotic supplementation is a promising preventive strategy for atopic dermatitis (AD). To help clarifying the significance of timing with respect to prevention of AD, we here evaluate the benefit of prophylactic use of probiotic supplementation in neonates younger than 30 weeks of gestation. Preterm children from the Department of Neonatology, Rigshospitalet, Denmark from two different admission periods were included in a historically controlled cohort study. Neonates from January 2007 to February 2010, not treated with and neonates from March 2010 to February 2013 treated with probiotic were enrolled. Main outcome was prevalence of AD, and secondary outcomes were use of topical corticosteroids, and number of skin-related visits to GPs and dermatologists. 527 preterm neonates were included in the study, 249 treated and 278 not treated with probiotics. Response rate for the two cohorts was 76.7 and 77.7% respectively. The prevalence of AD was similar in the two groups (20.9% in the probiotic treated group versus 17.1% in the not treated group, p?=?0.33). No significant differences were found between the groups with respect to treatment with topical corticosteroids, or visits at GPs or dermatologist. We found no indication that probiotics may prevent AD when administered to neonates?
PubMed ID
28271213 View in PubMed
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22 records – page 1 of 3.