Skip header and navigation

Refine By

20 records – page 1 of 2.

Alcohol expectancy and hazardous drinking: a 6-year longitudinal and nationwide study of medical doctors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99472
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2010;16(1):17-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Kjersti S Grotmol
Per Vaglum
Øivind Ekeberg
Tore Gude
Olaf G Aasland
Reidar Tyssen
Author Affiliation
Department of Behavioral Sciences in Medicine, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. k.s.grotmol@medisin.uio.no
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2010;16(1):17-22
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Physicians - trends
Abstract
AIM: The study's aim was to determine whether medical doctors' expectancy that alcohol use reduces tension predicts the extent of their hazardous drinking and whether this effect is mediated by drinking to cope. METHODS: A group of Norwegian medical doctors' (n = 288) alcohol use was followed for 6 years. The expectancy that alcohol reduces tension and the use of alcohol to cope with tension were measured 3.5 years after graduation (T1), and hazardous drinking was evaluated at T1 and 9.5 years after graduation (T2). RESULTS: At T1, 15% of men and 3% of women reported hazardous drinking. At T2, these proportions were 16 and 2%, respectively. Men reported a higher expectancy than women that alcohol reduces tension (p = 0.03), whereas there was no sex difference in drinking to cope. Adjusted predictors of hazardous drinking at T2 were male sex (p
PubMed ID
19887805 View in PubMed
Less detail

Change in interpersonal problems after cognitive agoraphobia and schema-focused therapy versus psychodynamic treatment as usual of inpatients with agoraphobia and Cluster C personality disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158201
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2008 Apr;49(2):195-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Tore Gude
Asle Hoffart
Author Affiliation
Tore Gude, Research Institute, Modum Bad, N-3370 Vikersund, Norway. tore.gude@modum-bad.no
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2008 Apr;49(2):195-9
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agoraphobia - complications - psychology - therapy
Cognitive Therapy - methods - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Inpatients - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Norway
Panic Disorder - complications - psychology - therapy
Personality Disorders - complications - psychology - therapy
Psychotherapy - methods - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim was to study whether patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia and co-occurring Cluster C traits would respond differently regarding change in interpersonal problems as part of their personality functioning when receiving two different treatment modalities. Two cohorts of patients were followed through three months' in-patient treatment programs and assessed at follow-up one year after end of treatment. The one cohort comprised 18 patients treated with "treatment as usual" according to psychodynamic principles, the second comprised 24 patients treated in a cognitive agoraphobia and schema-focused therapy program. Patients in the cognitive condition showed greater improvement in interpersonal problems than patients in the treatment as usual condition. Although this quasi-experimental study has serious limitations, the results may indicate that agoraphobic patients with Cluster C traits should be treated in cognitive agoraphobia and schema-focused programs rather than in psychodynamic treatment as usual programs in order to reduce their level of interpersonal problems.
PubMed ID
18352990 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparing self-reported communication skills of medical students in traditional and integrated curricula: a nationwide study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173544
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2005 Sep;58(3):271-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Tore Gude
Anders Baerheim
Are Holen
Tor Anvik
Arnstein Finset
Hilde Grimstad
Per Hjortdahl
Terje Risberg
Per Vaglum
Author Affiliation
Department of Behavioral Sciences in Medicine, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1111-Blindern, N-0317 Oslo, Norway. tore.gude@medisin.uio.no
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2005 Sep;58(3):271-8
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Communication
Curriculum
Education, Medical
Educational Measurement
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Physician-Patient Relations
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
To investigate medical students' self-assessments of their communication skills through medical school related to background factors, curriculum design and perceived medical school stress.
Medical students at all year levels attending Norwegian universities in the spring of 2003 were mailed the Oslo Inventory of Self-reported Communication Skills (OSISCS) developed by the authors. Of the total number of students (N=3055), 60% responded. One school had a traditional curriculum, the other three ran integrated models.
Students assessed their instrumental communication skills to increase linearly year by year, while the relational skills showed a curve-linear trajectory reaching the optimum level half-way into the curriculum. Students attending the traditional school reported lower levels of instrumental skills compared to the students from the integrated schools. In relational skills, a similar difference was maintained half-way into the curriculum, but disappeared towards the end. Perceived medical school stress correlated to the self-reported end point levels of the two types of communication skills.
The trajectories of self-reported instrumental and relational skills indicate significant variations in facilitating mechanisms between curricula, cognitive processing and perceived medical school stress.
Self-reported instrumental and relational communication skills develop differently in medical students over the years according to the type of curriculum.
Curricula should be evaluated for improvement implementations.
PubMed ID
16061342 View in PubMed
Less detail

Curriculum factors influencing knowledge of communication skills among medical students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160934
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2007;7:35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Anders Baerheim
Per Hjortdahl
Are Holen
Tor Anvik
Ole Bernt Fasmer
Hilde Grimstad
Tore Gude
Terje Risberg
Per Vaglum
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. anders.barheim@isf.uib.no
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2007;7:35
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
Communication
Cross-Sectional Studies
Curriculum
Education, Medical - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Physician-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Abstract
Communication training builds on the assumption that understanding of the concepts related to professional communication facilitates the training. We know little about whether students' knowledge of clinical communication skills is affected by their attendance of communication training courses, or to what degree other elements of the clinical training or curriculum design also play a role. The aim of this study was to determine which elements of the curriculum influence acquisition of knowledge regarding clinical communication skills by medical students.
The study design was a cross-sectional survey performed in the four Norwegian medical schools with different curricula, spring 2003. A self-administered questionnaire regarding knowledge of communication skills (an abridged version of van Dalen's paper-and-pencil test) was sent to all students attending the four medical schools. A total of 1801 (59%) students responded with complete questionnaires.
At the end of the 1st year of study, the score on the knowledge test was higher in students at the two schools running communication courses and providing early patient contact (mean 81%) than in the other two medical schools (mean 69-75%, P
Notes
Cites: Med Educ. 2002 Feb;36(2):108-911869435
Cites: Med Educ. 2002 Feb;36(2):125-3411869439
Cites: Med Educ. 2002 Feb;36(2):148-5311869442
Cites: Can J Neurol Sci. 2002 Jun;29 Suppl 2:S23-912139082
Cites: BMJ. 2002 Sep 28;325(7366):697-70012351365
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Sep 3;290(9):1157-6512952997
Cites: Arch Dis Child. 2006 Apr;91(4):367-7016551795
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 1995 Feb;21(2):371-77714297
Cites: Med Educ. 1995 May;29(3):247-537623721
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2005 Sep;58(3):265-7016023822
Cites: J Palliat Med. 2005 Aug;8(4):857-6616128661
Cites: Med Teach. 2005 Nov;27(7):644-616332559
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Aug 28;123(16):2277-8014508554
PubMed ID
17925041 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does change from a traditional to a new medical curriculum reduce negative attitudes among students? A quasi-experimental study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170916
Source
Med Teach. 2005 Dec;27(8):737-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Tore Gude
Per Hjortdahl
Tor Anvik
Anders Baerheim
Ole B Fasmer
Hilde Grimstad
Reidar Tyssen
Øivind Ekeberg
Per Vaglum
Author Affiliation
Department of Behavioural Sciences in Medicine, University of Oslo, N-0317 Oslo, Norway. tore.gude@basalmed.uio.no
Source
Med Teach. 2005 Dec;27(8):737-9
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Cross-Sectional Studies
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Students, Medical - psychology
Abstract
The authors investigated whether a new type of medical school curriculum-with problem-based learning, integrated preclinical and clinical phases, and increased levels of contact between students, patients and teachers--is associated with lower levels of students' negative attitudes towards medical training than is a traditional medical school curriculum. This association was found, and was confirmed by a comparison between students in a university that had changed from a traditional curriculum to a new curriculum. Curriculum design may explain differences in students' attitudes towards medical school.
PubMed ID
16451898 View in PubMed
Less detail

Do medical students and young physicians assess reliably their self-efficacy regarding communication skills? A prospective study from end of medical school until end of internship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291457
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2017 Jun 30; 17(1):107
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-30-2017
Author
Tore Gude
Arnstein Finset
Tor Anvik
Anders Bærheim
Ole Bernt Fasmer
Hilde Grimstad
Per Vaglum
Author Affiliation
Department of Behavioural Sciences in Medicine, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, POB 1111 - Blindern, Norway, N-0317, Oslo, Norway. tore.gude@medisin.uio.no.
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2017 Jun 30; 17(1):107
Date
Jun-30-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Clinical Competence - standards
Communication
Educational Measurement - methods
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency - standards
Male
Norway
Patient Simulation
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians
Prospective Studies
Schools, Medical
Self Efficacy
Students, Medical
Videotape Recording
Young Adult
Abstract
This prospective study from end of medical school through internship investigates the course and possible change of self- reported self-efficacy in communication skills compared with observers' ratings of such skills in consultations with simulated patients.
Sixty-two medical students (43 females) from four Norwegian universities performed a videotaped consultation with a simulated patient immediately before medical school graduation (T1) and after internship (internal medicine, surgery and family medicine, half a year each - T2). Before each consultation, the participants assessed their general self-efficacy in communication skills. Trained observers scored the videos and applied a well-validated instrument to rate the communication behaviour. Results from the two assessment methods were correlated at both time points and possible differences from T1 to T2 were explored.
A close to zero correlation between self-efficacy and observed communication skills were found at T1. At T2, participants' self-efficacy scores were inversely correlated with levels of observed skills, demonstrating a lack of concordance between young physicians' own assessment of self-efficacy and observers' assessment. When dividing the sample in three groups based on the observers' scores (low 2/3), the group of male physicians showed higher levels of self-efficacy than females in all the three performance groups at T1. At T2, those having a high performance score yielded a low self-efficacy, regardless of gender.
The lack of positive correlations between self-efficacy assessment and expert ratings points to limitations in the applicability of self-assessment measures of communication skills. Due to gender differences, groups of female and male physicians should be investigated separately. Those obtaining high-performance ratings from observers, through the period of internship, may become more conscious of how demanding clinical communication with patients may be. This insight may represent a potential for growth, but could in some physicians represent too much of a self-critical attitude. Active supervision of young physicians throughout internship is important in order to help physicians to be more aware of their strengths and weaknesses, in order to gain increased mastery in the art of doctoring.
Notes
Cites: Med Teach. 2007 Nov;29(9):921-6 PMID 18158666
Cites: J Med Pract Manage. 2001 Jan-Feb;16(4):184-91 PMID 11317576
Cites: Psychol Rev. 1977 Mar;84(2):191-215 PMID 847061
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2009 Aug;76(2):207-12 PMID 19135826
Cites: Med Teach. 1980;2(5):248-51 PMID 24475964
Cites: Acad Med. 1997 Oct;72(10 Suppl 1):S57-9 PMID 9347740
Cites: Acad Med. 2003 Dec;78(12):1281-6 PMID 14660433
Cites: Psychooncology. 2003 Oct-Nov;12(7):686-93 PMID 14502593
Cites: JAMA. 2006 Sep 6;296(9):1094-102 PMID 16954489
Cites: Med Educ. 2005 Jan;39(1):66-74 PMID 15612902
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2011 Jul;84(1):3-9 PMID 20708898
Cites: J Clin Oncol. 2002 Feb 1;20(3):765-9 PMID 11821459
Cites: Med Educ. 1999 Feb;33(2):101-5 PMID 10211259
Cites: Psychol Bull. 1979 Mar;86(2):420-8 PMID 18839484
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2013 May;91(2):180-5 PMID 23414658
Cites: Acad Med. 1991 Dec;66(12):762-9 PMID 1750956
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2006 Jul;62(1):38-45 PMID 15964736
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1997 Jan;44(2):231-40 PMID 9015875
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2008 Sep;72(3):374-81 PMID 18656322
Cites: Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2002;7(1):63-80 PMID 11912336
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 1998 Nov;35(3):161-76 PMID 9887849
PubMed ID
28666440 View in PubMed
Less detail

Do physicians improve their communication skills between finishing medical school and completing internship? A nationwide prospective observational cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153235
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2009 Aug;76(2):207-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Tore Gude
Per Vaglum
Tor Anvik
Anders Baerheim
Ole Bernt Fasmer
Hilde Grimstad
Per Hjortdahl
Are Holen
Tone Nordøy
Hilde Eide
Author Affiliation
Department of Behavioral Sciences in Medicine and Institute of General Practice and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. tore.gude@medisin.uio.no
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2009 Aug;76(2):207-12
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Clinical Competence
Communication
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Graduate
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Linear Models
Male
Norway
Patient Education as Topic
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians
Prospective Studies
Schools, Medical
Statistics as Topic
Students, Medical
Abstract
To test whether young physicians improve their communication skills between graduating from medical school and completing clinical internship, and to explore contributing background and/or internship factors.
Norwegian medical students graduating June 2004 were invited to take part in a videotaped standardized patient interview February 2004. Of the 111 students who originally participated, 62 completed a second interview February 2006. Observed communication skills were assessed with the Arizona Communication Interview Rating Scale (ACIR).
The level of communication skills increased significantly during the period for participants overall; and for females but not males. General social skills reached significantly higher levels than specific professional skills, both types of skill improving during the study. Independent predictors were working in local hospitals, learning atmosphere and low stress. At school completion, 50% reached a level defined as 'advanced beginner'. Towards the end of the internship, 58% reached 'capable' and 27% 'competent' levels of communication skills.
Female physicians improved most in communication skills, the gender difference being multivariate mediated through low stress levels and learning atmosphere. The findings support the division of communication skills into general social and specific professional skills.
The relatively low proportion of young physicians, especially males, developing the capability to practise independently at internship completion indicates a need for more effective training in communication skills, during both medical school and internship.
PubMed ID
19135826 View in PubMed
Less detail

The effect of implementing the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2 feedback system in Norway: A multisite randomized clinical trial in a naturalistic setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274752
Source
Psychother Res. 2015;25(6):669-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Ingunn Amble
Tore Gude
Sven Stubdal
Bror Just Andersen
Bruce E Wampold
Source
Psychother Res. 2015;25(6):669-77
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Feedback
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Psychotherapy - standards
Quality of Health Care - standards
Surveys and Questionnaires - standards
Young Adult
Abstract
It has been claimed that the monitoring of ongoing psychotherapy is of crucial importance for improving the quality of mental health care. This study investigated the effect of using the Norwegian version of the patient feedback system OQ-Analyst using the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2. Patients from six psychiatric clinics in Southern Norway (N = 259) were randomized to feedback (FB) or no feedback (NFB). The main effect of feedback was statistical significant (p = .027), corroborating the hypothesis that feedback would improve the quality of services, although the size of the effect was small to moderate (d = 0.32). The benefits of feedback have to be considered against the costs of implementation.
PubMed ID
25101527 View in PubMed
Less detail

A few more minutes make a difference? The relationship between content and length of GP consultations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117599
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2013 Mar;31(1):31-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Tore Gude
Per Vaglum
Tor Anvik
Anders Bærheim
Hilde Grimstad
Author Affiliation
Department of Behavioural Sciences in Medicine, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, N-0317 Oslo, Norway, research conducting unit. tore.gude@medisin.uio.no
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2013 Mar;31(1):31-5
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Norway
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
Abstract
To investigate the relationship between the length of a medical consultation in a general practice setting and the biopsychosocial information obtained by the physician, and to explore the characteristics of young physicians obtaining comprehensive, especially psychosocial information.
A prospective, longitudinal follow-up study.
Videotaped consultations with standardized patients on two occasions were scored for the amount of biopsychosocial information obtained. Consultation length was recorded in minutes. Subjects. Final-year (T-1) medical school students (n = 111) participated in the project. On completion of their internship one and a half years later (T-2), 62 attended a second time, as young physicians.
Content lists.
Pearson's r correlations between content and length at T-1 and T-2 were 0.27 and 0.66, respectively (non-overlapping confidence intervals). Psychosocial content increased significantly when consultations exceeded 13 minutes (15 minutes scheduled). Physicians using more than 13 minutes had previously, as hospital interns, perceived more stress in the emergency room and had worked in local hospitals.
A strong association was found between consultation length and information, especially psychosocial information, obtained by the physicians at internship completion. This finding should be considered by faculty members and organizers of the internship period. Further research is needed to detect when, during the educational process, increased emphasis on communication skills training would be most beneficial for students/residents, and how the medical curriculum and internship period should be designed to optimize young physicians' use of time in consultations.
Notes
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2001 Jun;51(467):456-6011407050
Cites: BMJ. 2002 Aug 31;325(7362):47212202329
Cites: Med J Aust. 2004 Jul 19;181(2):100-415257650
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2009 Aug;76(2):207-1219135826
Cites: Med Teach. 2005 Sep;27(6):539-4316199362
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2007;7:7117506904
Cites: BMC Med Educ. 2007;7:4317996053
Cites: Gastroenterology. 1990 Feb;98(2):293-3012295384
PubMed ID
23282010 View in PubMed
Less detail

Identification with the role of doctor at the end of medical school: a nationwide longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51924
Source
Med Educ. 2005 Jan;39(1):66-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Tore Gude
Per Vaglum
Reidar Tyssen
Oivind Ekeberg
Erlend Hem
Jan Ole Røvik
Kristine Finset
Nina Tangnaes Grønvold
Author Affiliation
Department of Behavioural Sciences in Medicine, University of Oslo, N-0317 Oslo, Norway. tore.gude@basalmed.uio.no
Source
Med Educ. 2005 Jan;39(1):66-74
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence - standards
Cohort Studies
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - standards
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Physician's Role - psychology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Students, Medical - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Given the sparse literature on the topic, there is a need to know more about student identification with the role of doctor, particularly with respect to the possible impact of pre-existing and medical school factors. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: Medical students at all 4 Norwegian universities (n = 421) were mailed questionnaires on entry to their medical course (T1). Respondents were surveyed again halfway through (T2) and at the end (T3) of their 6-year courses. The study sample comprised the 236 students who responded on all 3 occasions. RESULTS: No significant variation occurred between medical schools in the level of student identification with the role of doctor, except for a significant gender difference at 1 university. Among pre-existing factors, interpersonal problems and confidence in one's own knowledge had independent impact on role identification controlled for gender, age, parental relationships, personality and mental health. This impact was mediated through perceived stress and perceived recording skills, while confidence in knowledge also maintained impact in the final model. Women had a lower level of role identification, with the strongest impact coming from pre-existing factors like interpersonal problems, fear of encountering demanding work, and confidence in own knowledge. For men, change in perceived medical school stress from T2 to T3 and perceived recording/clinical skills had significant impact on the level of role identification. CONCLUSION: Pre-existing factors, partly mediated through skill acquisition and stressful medical school experiences, influenced role identification. In women, pre-existing factors had a significant impact upon role identification, contrasting with men, whose role identification was more influenced by medical school factors.
PubMed ID
15612902 View in PubMed
Less detail

20 records – page 1 of 2.