Skip header and navigation

Refine By

7 records – page 1 of 1.

Cannabis use is associated with 3years earlier onset of schizophrenia spectrum disorder in a naturalistic, multi-site sample (N=1119).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277445
Source
Schizophr Res. 2016 Jan;170(1):217-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Siri Helle
Petter Andreas Ringen
Ingrid Melle
Tor-Ketil Larsen
Rolf Gjestad
Erik Johnsen
Trine Vik Lagerberg
Ole A Andreassen
Rune Andreas Kroken
Inge Joa
Wenche Ten Velden Hegelstad
Else-Marie Løberg
Source
Schizophr Res. 2016 Jan;170(1):217-21
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Cannabis
Family
Female
Humans
Male
Marijuana Abuse - complications - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Psychotic Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Schizophrenia - complications - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and substance use may have an earlier onset of illness compared to those without substance use. Most previous studies have, however, too small samples to control for confounding variables and the effect of specific types of substances. The present study aimed to examine the relationship between substance use and age at onset, in addition to the influence of possible confounders and specific substances, in a large and heterogeneous multisite sample of patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders.
The patients (N=1119) were recruited from catchment areas in Oslo, Stavanger and Bergen, Norway, diagnosed according to DSM-IV and screened for substance use history. Linear regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between substance use and age at onset of illness.
Patients with substance use (n=627) had about 3years earlier age at onset (23.0years; SD 7.1) than the abstinent group (n=492; 25.9years; SD 9.7). Only cannabis use was statistically significantly related to earlier age at onset. Gender or family history of psychosis did not influence the results.
Cannabis use is associated with 3years earlier onset of psychosis.
PubMed ID
26682958 View in PubMed
Less detail

Early Predictors of Ten-Year Course in First-Episode Psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279449
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2016 Apr 01;67(4):438-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-01-2016
Author
Svein Friis
Ingrid Melle
Jan Olav Johannessen
Jan Ivar Røssberg
Helene Eidsmo Barder
Julie Horgen Evensen
Ulrik Haahr
Wenche Ten Velden Hegelstad
Inge Joa
Johannes Langeveld
Tor Ketil Larsen
Stein Opjordsmoen
Bjørn Rishovd Rund
Erik Simonsen
Per Wiggen Vaglum
Thomas H McGlashan
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2016 Apr 01;67(4):438-43
Date
Apr-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Remission Induction
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Social Skills
Time Factors
Abstract
Identifying patients at risk of poor outcome at an early stage of illness can aid in treatment planning. This study sought to create a best-fit statistical model of known baseline and early-course risk factors to predict time in psychosis during a ten-year follow-up period after a first psychotic episode.
Between 1997 and 2000, 301 patients with DSM-IV nonorganic, nonaffective first-episode psychosis were recruited consecutively from catchment area-based sectors in Norway and Denmark. Specialized mental health personnel evaluated patients at baseline, three months, and one, two, five, and ten years (N=186 at ten years). Time in psychosis was defined as time with scores =4 on any of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale items P1, P3, P5, P6, and G9. Evaluations were retrospective, based on clinical interviews and all available clinical information. During the first two years, patients were also evaluated by their clinicians at least biweekly. Baseline and early-course predictors of long-term course were identified with linear mixed-model analyses.
Four variables provided significant, additive predictions of longer time in psychosis during the ten-year follow-up: deterioration in premorbid social functioning, duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) of =26 weeks, core schizophrenia spectrum disorder, and no remission within three months.
First-episode psychosis patients should be followed carefully after the start of treatment. If symptoms do not remit within three months with adequate treatment, there is a considerable risk of a poor long-term outcome, particularly for patients with a deterioration in premorbid social functioning, a DUP of at least half a year, and a diagnosis within the core schizophrenia spectrum.
PubMed ID
26567932 View in PubMed
Less detail

Geographical accessibility and duration of untreated psychosis: distance as a determinant of treatment delay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288039
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2017 05 10;17(1):176
Publication Type
Article
Date
05-10-2017
Author
Erling Inge Kvig
Beate Brinchmann
Cathrine Moe
Steinar Nilssen
Tor Ketil Larsen
Knut Sørgaard
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2017 05 10;17(1):176
Date
05-10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Norway
Psychotic Disorders - therapy
Referral and Consultation
Risk factors
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Time-to-Treatment - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The duration of untreated psychosis is determined by both patient and service related factors. Few studies have considered the geographical accessibility of services in relation to treatment delay in early psychosis. To address this, we investigated whether treatment delay is co-determined by straight-line distance to hospital based specialist services in a mainly rural mental health context.
A naturalistic cross-sectional study was conducted among a sample of recent onset psychosis patients in northern Norway (n = 62). Data on patient and service related determinants were analysed.
Half of the cohort had a treatment delay longer than 4.5 months. In a binary logistic regression model, straight-line distance was found to make an independent contribution to delay in which we controlled for other known risk factors.
The determinants of treatment delay are complex. This study adds to previous studies on treatment delay by showing that the spatial location of services also makes an independent contribution. In addition, it may be that insidious onset is a more important factor in treatment delay in remote areas, as the logistical implications of specialist referral are much greater than for urban dwellers. The threshold for making a diagnosis in a remote location may therefore be higher. Strategies to reduce the duration of untreated psychosis in rural areas would benefit from improving appropriate referral by crisis services, and the detection of insidious onset of psychosis in community based specialist services.
Notes
Cites: Nord J Psychiatry. 2003;57(4):253-6112888399
Cites: Psychopathology. 2001 Jan;34(1):8-1411150925
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2007 Nov;96(1-3):206-1417719746
Cites: Epidemiol Psichiatr Soc. 2004 Apr-Jun;13(2):73-715298315
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2008 Dec;43(12):975-8218604616
Cites: Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2014 May;60(3):280-923704113
Cites: Inquiry. 1984 Spring;21(1):84-956232220
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2004 Aug;185:108-1515286061
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2007 Sep;95(1-3):1-817628441
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2013 Jun 17;13:22223773207
Cites: Early Interv Psychiatry. 2012 Aug;6(3):239-4622221408
Cites: Ann Acad Med Singapore. 2006 Jan;35(1):24-616470270
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2013 Jul;203(1):58-6423703317
Cites: Clin Pract Epidemiol Ment Health. 2008 Dec 16;4:2919087302
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2006 Nov;189:446-5217077436
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;205(2):88-9425252316
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2009;27(3):180-519562626
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2005 May;40(5):350-615902405
Cites: Addict Behav. 2003 Aug;28(6):1183-9212834661
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 1982;8(3):470-847134891
Cites: Early Interv Psychiatry. 2009 May;3(2):131-621352186
Cites: Health Serv Manage Res. 1989 Nov;2(3):191-20310296915
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2005 Dec 1;80(1):117-3015978778
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2006 Jan 1;81(1):75-8216309892
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2002 Oct;106(4):265-7512225493
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 1996;22(2):241-568782284
Cites: J Nerv Ment Dis. 2015 Mar;203(3):222-525714256
Cites: Psychol Med. 1991 Aug;21(3):761-741946864
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2011 Apr;198(4):256-6321972275
Cites: Early Interv Psychiatry. 2015 Apr;9(2):118-2524119045
Cites: Psychol Med. 2004 Feb;34(2):255-6614982131
Cites: Compr Psychiatry. 2000 May-Jun;41(3):184-9010834627
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005 Sep;62(9):975-8316143729
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1970 Jun;85(6):510-54987771
Cites: Early Interv Psychiatry. 2014 Nov;8(4):375-8124119017
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1993 Oct;88(4):229-348256636
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2005 May;40(5):345-915902404
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2011 Aug;199(2):151-521804150
Cites: Adm Policy Ment Health. 2008 Sep;35(5):346-5618512144
Cites: Psychol Med. 2010 Oct;40(10):1585-9720236571
Cites: Br J Psychiatry Suppl. 1998;172(33):45-529764126
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1963;39:SUPPL169:22614085197
Cites: Eur Psychiatry. 1998 Nov;13(7):346-5219706264
Cites: BMC Psychiatry. 2014 Mar 12;14:7224620939
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 1987;13(2):261-763616518
PubMed ID
28486982 View in PubMed
Less detail

Predictors of involuntary hospitalizations to acute psychiatry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116463
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2013 Mar-Apr;36(2):136-43
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kjetil Hustoft
Tor Ketil Larsen
Bjørn Auestad
Inge Joa
Jan Olav Johannessen
Torleif Ruud
Author Affiliation
Stavanger University Hospital, Division of Psychiatry, Armauer Hansensvei 20, Post Office Box 8100, N-4068 Stavanger, Norway. khu2@sus.no
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2013 Mar-Apr;36(2):136-43
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aggression - psychology
Commitment of Mentally Ill - legislation & jurisprudence
Community Mental Health Centers - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
General Practice - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Motivation
Norway
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - legislation & jurisprudence
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - legislation & jurisprudence
Sex Factors
Social Adjustment
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Young Adult
Abstract
There is little knowledge of predictors for involuntary hospitalizations in acute psychiatric units.
The Multi-center study of Acute Psychiatry included all cases of acute consecutive psychiatric admissions in twenty acute psychiatric units in Norway, representing about 75% of the acute psychiatric units during 2005-2006. Data included admission process, rating of Global Assessment of Functioning and Health of the Nation Outcome Scales.
Fifty-six percent were voluntary and 44% involuntary hospitalized. Regression analysis identified contact with police, referral by physicians who did not know the patient, contact with health services within the last 48 h, not living in own apartment or house, high scores for aggression, level of hallucinations and delusions, and contact with an out-of office clinic within the last 48 h and low GAF symptom score as predictors for involuntary hospitalization. Involuntary patients were older, more often male, non-Norwegian, unmarried and had lower level of education. They more often had disability pension or received social benefits, and were more often admitted during evenings and nights, found to have more frequent substance abuse and less often responsible for children and were less frequently motivated for admission. Involuntary patients had less contact with psychiatric services before admission. Most patients were referred because of a deterioration of their psychiatric illness.
Involuntary hospitalization seems to be guided by the severity of psychiatric symptoms and factors "surrounding" the referred patient. Important factors seem to be male gender, substance abuse, contact with own GP, aggressive behavior, and low level of social functioning and lack of motivation. There was a need for assistance by the police in a significant number of cases. This complicated picture offers some important challenges to the organization of primary and psychiatric health services and a need to consider better pathways to care.
PubMed ID
23395506 View in PubMed
Less detail

Treated incidence and baseline characteristics of substance induced psychosis in a Norwegian catchment area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105958
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2013;13:319
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Melissa A Weibell
Inge Joa
Jørgen Bramness
Jan Olav Johannessen
Patrick D McGorry
Wenche Ten Velden Hegelstad
Tor Ketil Larsen
Author Affiliation
Regional Centre for Clinical Research in Psychosis, TIPS, Stavanger University Hospital, Armauer Hansensvei, 4014 Stavanger, Norway. weim@sus.no.
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2013;13:319
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychoses, Substance-Induced - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Substance misuse is a well-recognized co-morbidity to psychosis and has been linked to poor prognostic outcomes in patients. Researchers have yet to investigate the difference in rates and characteristics between first-episode Substance Induced Psychosis (SIP) and primary psychosis. We aimed at comparing patients with SIP to primary psychosis patients with or without substance misuse at baseline.
Thirty SIP patients, 45 primary psychosis patients with substance misuse (PS) and 66 primary psychosis patients without substance misuse (PNS) in a well-defined Norwegian catchment area were included from 2007-2011. Assessments included symptom levels (PANSS), diagnostic interviews (SCID), premorbid function scale (PAS) and global functioning (GAF f/s).
Treated incidence for SIP was found to be 6.5/100 000 persons per year, 9.7/100 000 persons per year for PS and 24.1/100 000 persons per year for PNS (15-65 yrs). Patients who had substance misuse (PS and SIP) were more likely to be male. Duration of Untreated Psychosis (DUP) was significantly shorter in the SIP group (5.0 wks., p?=?0.003) and these had more positive symptoms on the PANSS (p?=?0.049). SIP patients also did poorer on early youth academic levels on the PAS.
Yearly treated incidence of SIP is 6.5/100 000 persons per year in a Norwegian catchment area. SIP patients have short DUPs, are more likely to be male, have more positive symptoms at baseline and poorer premorbid academic scores in early adolescence. Follow-up will evaluate stability of diagnosis and characteristics.
PubMed ID
24279887 View in PubMed
Less detail

Treatment and violent behavior in persons with first episode psychosis during a 10-year prospective follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259887
Source
Schizophr Res. 2014 Jul;156(2-3):272-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Johannes Langeveld
Stål Bjørkly
Bjørn Auestad
Helene Barder
Julie Evensen
Wenche Ten Velden Hegelstad
Inge Joa
Jan Olav Johannessen
Tor Ketil Larsen
Ingrid Melle
Stein Opjordsmoen
Jan Ivar Røssberg
Bjørn Rishovd Rund
Erik Simonsen
Per Vaglum
Thomas McGlashan
Svein Friis
Source
Schizophr Res. 2014 Jul;156(2-3):272-6
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Crime
Denmark - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Risk
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Violence
Young Adult
Abstract
First episode psychosis (FEP) patients have an increased risk for violence and criminal activity prior to initial treatment. However, little is known about the prevalence of criminality and acts of violence many years after implementation of treatment for a first episode psychosis.
To assess the prevalence of criminal and violent behaviors during a 10-year follow-up period after the debut of a first psychosis episode, and to identify early predictors and concomitant risk factors of violent behavior.
A prospective design was used with comprehensive assessments of criminal behavior, drug abuse, clinical, social and treatment variables at baseline, five, and 10-year follow-up. Additionally, threatening and violent behavior was assessed at 10-year follow-up. A clinical epidemiological sample of first-episode psychosis patients (n=178) was studied.
During the 10-year follow-up period, 20% of subjects had been apprehended or incarcerated. At 10-year follow-up, 15% of subjects had exposed others to threats or violence during the year before assessment. Illegal drug use at baseline and five-year follow-up, and a longer duration of psychotic symptoms were found to be predictive of violent behavior during the year preceding the 10-year follow-up.
After treatment initiation, the overall prevalence of violence in psychotic patients drops gradually to rates close to those of the general population. However, persistent illicit drug abuse is a serious risk factor for violent behavior, even long after the start of treatment. Achieving remission early and reducing substance abuse may contribute to a lower long-term risk for violent behavior in FEP patients.
PubMed ID
24837683 View in PubMed
Less detail

Voluntary or involuntary acute psychiatric hospitalization in Norway: A 24h follow up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298276
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2018 Jan - Feb; 56:27-34
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Author
Kjetil Hustoft
Tor Ketil Larsen
Kolbjørn Brønnick
Inge Joa
Jan Olav Johannessen
Torleif Ruud
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychiatry, Center of Clinical Research in Psychosis, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway. Electronic address: kjetil.hustoft@sus.no.
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2018 Jan - Feb; 56:27-34
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Coercion
Commitment of Mentally Ill - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Rights
Prospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
The Norwegian Mental Health Care Act states that patients who are involuntarily admitted to a hospital must be reevaluated by a psychiatrist or a specialist in clinical psychology within 24h to assess whether the patient fulfills the legal criteria for the psychiatric status and symptoms. International research on the use of coercive hospitalization in psychiatry is scarce, and an investigation of Norway's routine re-evaluation of involuntarily referred patients may expand knowledge about this aspect of psychiatric treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent to which Involuntarily Hospitalized (IH) patients were converted to a Voluntary Hospitalization (VH), and to identify predictive factors leading to conversion. The Multi-center Acute Psychiatry study (MAP) included all cases of acute consecutive psychiatric admissions across twenty Norwegian acute psychiatric units in health trusts in Norway across 3months in 2005-06, representing about 75% of the psychiatric acute emergency units in Norway. The incident of conversion from involuntarily hospitalization (IH) to voluntary hospitalization (VH) was analyzed using generalized linear mixed modeling. Out of 3338 patients referred for admission, 1468 were IH (44%) and 1870 were VH. After re-evaluation, 1148 (78.2%) remained on involuntary hospitalization, while 320 patients (21.8%) were converted to voluntary hospitalization. The predictors of conversion from involuntary to voluntary hospitalization after re-evaluation of a specialist included patients wanting admission, better scores on Global Assessment of Symptom scale, fewer hallucinations and delusions and higher alcohol intake.
The 24h re-evaluation period for patients referred for involuntary hospitalization, as stipulated by the Norwegian Mental Health Care Act, appeared to give adequate opportunity to reduce unnecessary involuntary hospitalization, while safeguarding the patient's right to VH.
PubMed ID
29701596 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.