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The association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 concentration and risk of disease death in men: modification by magnesium intake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263529
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Apr;30(4):343-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Jaakko Mursu
Tarja Nurmi
Sari Voutilainen
Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen
Jyrki K Virtanen
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Apr;30(4):343-7
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Calcifediol - blood - deficiency
Cause of Death
Chromatography, Liquid
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Magnesium - administration & dosage - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood
Abstract
Low vitamin D status increases the risk of death. Magnesium plays an essential role in vitamin D metabolism and low magnesium intake may predispose to vitamin D deficiency and potentiate the health problems. We investigated whether magnesium intake modifies the serum 25(OH)D3 concentration and its associations with mortality in middle-aged and older men. We included 1892 men aged 42-60 years without cardiovascular disease or cancer at baseline in 1984-1989 from the prospective, population-based Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study. Serum 25(OH)D3 was measured with the high-performance liquid chromatography using coulometric electrode array detection. Magnesium intake was assessed with 4-day food recording. Deaths were ascertained by a computer linkage to the national cause of death register. Deaths due accidents and suicides were excluded. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to analyze the associations. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for death in the lowest (49.4 nmol/L) serum 25(OH)D3 tertile was 1.31 (95 % CI 1.07-1.60, Ptrend = 0.01). Stratified by the magnesium intake, the higher risk was observed only in the lower magnesium intake median (
PubMed ID
25762172 View in PubMed
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Association between serum zinc and later development of metabolic syndrome in middle aged and older men: The Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286108
Source
Nutrition. 2017 May;37:43-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Teymoor Yary
Jyrki K Virtanen
Anu Ruusunen
Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen
Sari Voutilainen
Source
Nutrition. 2017 May;37:43-47
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Triglycerides - blood
Waist Circumference
Zinc - blood
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate associations of serum zinc with incident metabolic syndrome and its components in middle-aged and older Finnish men.
An 11-y prospective follow-up study conducted among 683 men from the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study who were 42 to 60 y old at baseline in 1984 to 1989. The main outcome was incident metabolic syndrome, defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) criteria. Other outcomes were the individual components of the NCEP metabolic syndrome: Fasting blood glucose, serum triacylglycerols, serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, hypertension, and waist circumference.
During the average follow-up of 11 y, 139 men (20.4%) developed metabolic syndrome. Those in the highest tertile of serum zinc had 84% higher risk (95% confidence interval 12 to 201%, P trend across tertiles = 0.015) to develop metabolic syndrome compared with those in the lowest tertile, after adjustment for several potential confounders. The association between serum zinc and incident metabolic syndrome was attenuated by adjustment for waist circumference, serum HDL cholesterol, or hypertension. Serum zinc was also directly associated with higher waist circumference and hypertension and inversely associated with HDL cholesterol at the 11 y examinations.
We found a direct association between serum zinc and incidence of metabolic syndrome in middle-aged and older eastern Finnish men. Further studies are warranted to explore the mechanisms.
PubMed ID
28359361 View in PubMed
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Association of dietary cholesterol and egg intakes with the risk of incident dementia or Alzheimer disease: the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283553
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2017 Feb;105(2):476-484
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Maija Pt Ylilauri
Sari Voutilainen
Eija Lönnroos
Jaakko Mursu
Heli Ek Virtanen
Timo T Koskinen
Jukka T Salonen
Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen
Jyrki K Virtanen
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2017 Feb;105(2):476-484
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alzheimer Disease - blood - epidemiology
Animals
Apolipoprotein E4 - blood
Apolipoproteins E - blood
Cholesterol, Dietary - adverse effects
Cognition
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - blood - epidemiology
Eggs - adverse effects
Energy intake
Executive Function
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - blood - epidemiology
Neuropsychological Tests
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
There is little information about the associations of intakes of cholesterol and eggs, a major source of dietary cholesterol, with the risk of cognitive decline in general populations or in carriers of apolipoprotein E ?4 (APO-E4), a major risk factor for dementia.
We investigated the associations of cholesterol and egg intakes with incident dementia, Alzheimer disease (AD), and cognitive performance in middle-aged and older men from Eastern Finland.
A total of 2497 dementia-free men, aged 42-60 y in 1984-1989 at the baseline examinations of the prospective, population-based Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study, were included in the study. Information on the apolipoprotein E (Apo-E) phenotype was available for 1259 men. Data on cognitive performance tests at the 4-y re-examinations were available for 480 men. Dietary intakes were assessed with the use of 4-d food records at baseline. Dementia and AD diagnoses were based on Finnish health registers. Cox regression and ANCOVA were used for the analyses.
During the 21.9-y follow-up, 337 men were diagnosed with dementia, and 266 men were diagnosed with AD. Neither cholesterol nor egg intake was associated with a higher risk of incident dementia or AD. For example, when evaluated continuously, each intake of 100 mg cholesterol/d was associated with a multivariable-adjusted HR of 0.90 (95% CI: 0.79, 1.02) for incident dementia, and each additional 0.5 egg (27 g)/d was associated with an HR of 0.89 (95% CI: 0.78, 1.01). However, egg intake was associated with better performance on neuropsychological tests of the frontal lobe and executive functioning, the Trail Making Test, and the Verbal Fluency Test. The Apo-E4 phenotype did not modify the associations of cholesterol or egg intake (P-interactions > 0.11).
Neither cholesterol nor egg intake is associated with an increased risk of incident dementia or AD in Eastern Finnish men. Instead, moderate egg intake may have a beneficial association with certain areas of cognitive performance.
PubMed ID
28052883 View in PubMed
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Association of fatty liver index with the risk of incident cardiovascular disease and acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296183
Source
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 09; 30(9):1047-1054
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
09-2018
Author
Olubunmi O Olubamwo
Jyrki K Virtanen
Ari Voutilainen
Jussi Kauhanen
Jussi Pihlajamäki
Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Eastern Finland.
Source
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 09; 30(9):1047-1054
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Algorithms
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Decision Support Techniques
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - epidemiology
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Fatty liver disease (FLD) has been identified as constituting cardiometabolic risk. However, evidence on the association of fatty liver index (FLI) with cardiovascular disease (CVD) is largely cross-sectional, with limited evidence on the predictability of incident CVD, and specifically, acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Therefore, we aimed to investigate the prospective associations between fatty liver as estimated by FLI and incident CVD, and specifically AMI, in the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study cohort.
Our patients were 1205 middle-aged men free of CVD at baseline. The associations of baseline FLI with incident CVD and incident AMI were analyzed using multivariable-adjusted Cox regression models.
During a median follow-up of 17 years, a total of 690 incident cases of CVD and 269 cases of AMI were recorded through Finnish registries. For incident CVD, for the high (FLI=60) versus the low (=30) FLI category, the hazard ratio (HR) was 1.77 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.46-2.14] in the minimally adjusted model. With increasing adjustment, the association was attenuated progressively. In the most adjusted model, the HR was 1.41 (95% CI: 1.10-1.79). For incident AMI, for the high FLI category, the HR was 1.65 (95% CI: 1.22-2.23) in the minimally adjusted model, but in most comprehensive models when we included metabolic factors, the HR was not significant (HR=1.136, 95% CI: 0.777-1.662).
FLI can predict incident CVD. However, the predictability of AMI using FLI is subject to interactions of metabolic factors. Individuals with FLI in the moderate to high category should be evaluated and monitored for subclinical or overt cardiovascular (including coronary) disease.
PubMed ID
29912803 View in PubMed
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Association of follicle-stimulating hormone levels and risk of type 2 diabetes in older postmenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291332
Source
Menopause. 2017 Jul; 24(7):796-802
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Elizabeth R Bertone-Johnson
Jyrki K Virtanen
Leo Niskanen
Tarja Nurmi
Kimmo Ronkainen
Sari Voutilainen
Jaakko Mursu
Jussi Kauhanen
Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen
Author Affiliation
1Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 2Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland 3Department of Endocrinology, Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland 4Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Menopause. 2017 Jul; 24(7):796-802
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Glucose - analysis
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follicle Stimulating Hormone - blood
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Postmenopause - blood
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Recent studies of perimenopausal women have observed associations of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels with markers of insulin resistance, independent of estradiol. Whether FSH is related to type 2 diabetes (T2D) in older women who have completed the menopause transition remains unknown. We assessed the association of FSH levels with diabetes and measures of insulin resistance among 588 postmenopausal Finnish women.
Study participants were aged 53 to 73 years and not using hormone therapy at baseline (1998-2001) when FSH was measured. Prevalence of T2D was assessed at baseline, along with fasting insulin and glucose levels. Incident T2D, and insulin and glucose levels were assessed 7 to 9 years later at follow-up examination.
After adjustment for age, estradiol, body mass index, smoking, lipids levels, and other factors, women with higher FSH (>50?IU/L) had a lower prevalence of T2D (odds ratio 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28-0.86) than women with lower FSH. Each 1 unit increase in FSH level was associated with a significant 1.9% lower risk of T2D (95% CI 0.966-0.997, P?=?0.02). Higher FSH was associated with marginally significant lower incidence of T2D at follow-up (hazard ratio 0.53, 95% CI 0.27-1.02). Baseline FSH levels were inversely correlated with fasting insulin and glucose levels at both baseline and follow-up visits (all P?
PubMed ID
28141661 View in PubMed
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Association of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D with the risk of death in a general older population in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139812
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2011 Aug;50(5):305-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Jyrki K Virtanen
Tarja Nurmi
Sari Voutilainen
Jaakko Mursu
Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen
Author Affiliation
University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio Campus, Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, Finland. jyrki.virtanen@uef.fi
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2011 Aug;50(5):305-12
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - mortality
Cause of Death
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate the association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration, a marker of vitamin D status, and risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in a general older population with relatively low average serum 25(OH)D concentrations.
The study population included 552 men and 584 women aged 53-73 years who were free of CVD and cancer at baseline in 1998-2001 from the prospective, population-based Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor (KIHD) Study. Deaths were ascertained by a computer linkage to the national cause of death register. All deaths that occurred from the study entry to December 31, 2008, were included. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to analyze the association between serum 25(OH)D and risk of death.
The mean serum 25(OH)D concentration was 43.7 nmol/L (SD 17.8), with a strong seasonal variation. During the average follow-up of 9.1 years, 87 participants died, 35 from cardiovascular disease (CVD). After multivariable-adjustments, the hazard ratios (HR) for all cause death in the tertiles of serum 25(OH)D were 1, 1.68 (95% CI: 0.92, 3.07) and 2.06 (95% CI: 1.12, 3.80), p for trend = 0.02.
Our study supports the accumulating evidence from epidemiological studies that vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased risk of death. Large-scale primary prevention trials with vitamin D supplementation are warranted.
PubMed ID
20976461 View in PubMed
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Association of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D with type 2 diabetes and markers of insulin resistance in a general older population in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127163
Source
Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2012 Jul;28(5):418-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Anne-Riina Hurskainen
Jyrki K Virtanen
Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen
Tarja Nurmi
Sari Voutilainen
Author Affiliation
The Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, PO Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2012 Jul;28(5):418-23
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Insulin - metabolism
Insulin Resistance
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - complications
Abstract
Vitamin D insufficiency and type 2 diabetes are both common in Finland, and low vitamin D status has been suggested as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Our aim was to study the associations between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], a marker of vitamin D status, and glucose homeostasis and type 2 diabetes in a general population sample in Eastern Finland.
Cross-sectional analysis in the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study. A total of 850 men and 906 women, aged 53-73 years, were analysed. Relative risk (RR) of prevalent diabetes was estimated as odds ratios by logistic regression. Associations between serum 25(OH)D and markers of impaired glucose metabolism in tertiles of serum 25(OH)D concentration were assessed by linear regression.
The mean serum 25(OH)D concentration was 43.4 nmol/L (SD 17.6, range 8.5-122.8 nmol/L) in the study population. Serum 25(OH)D concentration
PubMed ID
22318870 View in PubMed
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The association of serum long-chain n-3 PUFA and hair mercury with exercise cardiac power in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282675
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Aug;116(3):487-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Behnam Tajik
Sudhir Kurl
Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen
Jyrki K Virtanen
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Aug;116(3):487-95
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Diet
Docosahexaenoic Acids - blood
Eicosapentaenoic Acid - blood
Exercise - physiology
Exercise Test
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - blood
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - blood
Feeding Behavior
Finland
Fishes
Hair - metabolism
Heart - physiology
Humans
Male
Mercury - metabolism
Middle Aged
Oxygen consumption
Physical Fitness
Risk factors
Seafood
Abstract
Long-chain n-3 PUFA from fish and exercise capacity are associated with CVD risk. Fish, especially large and old predatory fish, may contain Hg, which may attenuate the inverse association of long-chain n-3 PUFA with CVD. However, the associations of long-chain n-3 PUFA or Hg exposure with exercise capacity are not well known. We aimed to evaluate the associations of serum long-chain n-3 PUFA EPA, docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and DHA and hair Hg with exercise cardiac power (ECP, a ratio of VO2max:maximal systolic blood pressure (SBP) during an exercise test), a measure for exercise capacity. For this, data from the population-based Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study were analysed cross-sectionally in order to determine the associations between serum long-chain n-3 PUFA, hair Hg and ECP in 1672 men without CVD, aged 42-60 years. After multivariate adjustments, serum total long-chain n-3 PUFA concentration was associated with higher ECP and VO2max (P trend across quartiles=0·04 and P trend=0·02, respectively), but not with maximal SBP (P trend=0·69). Associations were generally similar when EPA, DPA and DHA were evaluated individually. Hair Hg was not associated with ECP, VO2max or maximal SBP. However, the associations of total long-chain n-3 PUFA (P interaction=0·03) and EPA (P interaction=0·02) with higher VO2max were stronger among men with lower hair Hg. Higher serum long-chain n-3 PUFA concentration, mainly a marker for fish consumption in this study population, was associated with higher ECP and VO2max in middle-aged men from eastern Finland.
PubMed ID
27255152 View in PubMed
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Associations of egg and cholesterol intakes with carotid intima-media thickness and risk of incident coronary artery disease according to apolipoprotein E phenotype in men: the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274383
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Mar;103(3):895-901
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Jyrki K Virtanen
Jaakko Mursu
Heli Ek Virtanen
Mikael Fogelholm
Jukka T Salonen
Timo T Koskinen
Sari Voutilainen
Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Mar;103(3):895-901
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Apolipoproteins E - metabolism
Carotid Artery Diseases - etiology - metabolism - physiopathology
Carotid Artery, Common - drug effects
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Cholesterol, Dietary - administration & dosage - adverse effects - pharmacology
Coronary Artery Disease - etiology - metabolism - physiopathology
Diet
Eggs - adverse effects
Finland
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
In general populations, the effects of dietary cholesterol on blood cholesterol concentrations are modest. However, the relation is stronger in those with an ?4 allele in the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE). There is little information on the association between cholesterol intake and the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) among those with the ApoE4 phenotype.
We investigated the associations of intakes of cholesterol and eggs, a major source of dietary cholesterol, with carotid intima-media thickness and the risk of incident CAD in middle-aged and older men from eastern Finland.
The study included 1032 men aged 42-60 y in 1984-1989 at the baseline examinations of the prospective, population-based Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study. Data on common carotid artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT) were available for 846 men. Dietary intakes were assessed with 4-d food records. Associations with incident CAD and baseline CCA-IMT were analyzed by using Cox regression and ANCOVA, respectively.
The ApoE4 phenotype was found in 32.5% of the men. During the average follow-up of 20.8 y, 230 CAD events occurred. Egg or cholesterol intakes were not associated with the risk of CAD. Each 1 additional egg (55 g)/d was associated with a multivariable-adjusted HR of 1.17 (95% CI: 0.85, 1.61) in the ApoE4 noncarriers and an HR of 0.93 (95% CI: 0.50, 1.72) in the ApoE4 carriers (P-interaction = 0.34). Each 100-mg/d higher cholesterol intake was associated with an HR of 1.04 (95% CI: 0.89, 1.22) in the ApoE4 noncarriers and an HR of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.73, 1.25) in the ApoE4 carriers (P-interaction = 0.81). Egg or cholesterol intakes were also not associated with increased CCA-IMT.
Egg or cholesterol intakes were not associated with increased CAD risk, even in ApoE4 carriers (i.e., in highly susceptible individuals).
Notes
Comment In: BMJ. 2016;352:i91926880021
PubMed ID
26864369 View in PubMed
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Associations of estimated ?-5-desaturase and ?-6-desaturase activities with stroke risk factors and risk of stroke: the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282749
Source
Br J Nutr. 2017 Feb;117(4):582-590
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Roya Daneshmand
Sudhir Kurl
Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen
Jyrki K Virtanen
Source
Br J Nutr. 2017 Feb;117(4):582-590
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arachidonic Acid - blood
Blood pressure
Body mass index
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cholesterol - blood
Fatty Acid Desaturases - metabolism
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Linoleoyl-CoA Desaturase - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Stroke - blood - enzymology - etiology
Triglycerides - blood
gamma-Linolenic Acid - blood
Abstract
Stroke is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The role of PUFA in reducing the risk of stroke is uncertain. The concentrations of PUFA in the human body are determined both by dietary intake and by activities of desaturase enzymes. Desaturase enzymes have been associated with chronic diseases, but little is known about their association with stroke risk. We investigated the associations of ?-6-desaturase (D6D) and ?-5-desaturase (D5D) activities with stroke risk factors and risk of stroke among 1842 men from the prospective, population-based Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study, aged 42-60 years and free of CVD at baseline in 1984-1989. ANCOVA and Cox regression models were used for the analyses. Whole serum desaturase activities were estimated as product:precursor ratios - ?-linolenic acid:linoleic acid for D6D and arachidonic acid:dihomo-?-linolenic acid for D5D. Higher D6D activity was associated with higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure, BMI, serum insulin and TAG concentrations and worse homoeostatic model assessment (HOMA) indices. In contrast, higher D5D activity was associated with lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure, BMI, serum insulin, LDL-cholesterol, TAG and C-reactive protein concentrations, higher HDL-cholesterol concentration, and better HOMA indices. During the mean follow-up of 21·2 years, 202 stroke cases occurred. Neither D6D activity (multivariable-adjusted extreme-quartile hazard ratios (HR) 1·18; 95 % CI 0·80, 1·74) nor D5D activity (HR 1·06; 95 % CI 0·70, 1·60) were associated with stroke risk. In conclusion, higher D5D activity was favourably associated and higher D6D activity unfavourably associated with several stroke risk factors, but not with the risk of incident stroke.
PubMed ID
28382895 View in PubMed
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52 records – page 1 of 6.