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Adolescent body composition and associations with body size and growth from birth to late adolescence. The Tromsø study: Fit Futures-A Norwegian longitudinal cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296939
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2018 Dec 27; :e12492
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-27-2018
Author
Elin Evensen
Nina Emaus
Anne-Sofie Furberg
Ane Kokkvoll
Jonathan Wells
Tom Wilsgaard
Anne Winther
Guri Skeie
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Research, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2018 Dec 27; :e12492
Date
Dec-27-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Fat and fat-free masses and fat distribution are related to cardiometabolic risk.
to explore how birth weight, childhood body mass index (BMI) and BMI gain were related to adolescent body composition and central obesity.
In a population-based longitudinal study, body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 907 Norwegian adolescents (48% girls). Associations between birth weight, BMI categories, and BMI gain were evaluated by fitting linear mixed models and conditional growth models with fat mass index (FMI, kg/m2 ), fat-free mass index (FFMI, kg/m2 ) standard deviation scores (SDS), and central obesity at 15 to 20 years, as well as change in FMI SDS and FFMI SDS between ages 15 to 17 and 18 to 20 as outcomes.
Birth weight was associated with FFMI in adolescence. Greater BMI gain in childhood, conditioned on prior body size, was associated with higher FMI, FFMI, and central overweight/obesity with the strongest associations seen at age 6 to 16.5 years: FMI SDS: ß = 0.67, 95% CI (0.63-0.71), FFMI SDS: 0.46 (0.39, 0.52), in girls, FMI SDS: 0.80 (0.75, 0.86), FFMI SDS: 0.49 (0.43, 0.55), in boys.
Compared with birth and early childhood, high BMI and greater BMI gain at later ages are strong predictors of higher fat mass and central overweight/obesity at 15 to 20 years of age.
PubMed ID
30590874 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescent body composition and associations with body size and growth from birth to late adolescence. The Tromsø study: Fit Futures-A Norwegian longitudinal cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300460
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2019 05; 14(5):e12492
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2019
Author
Elin Evensen
Nina Emaus
Anne-Sofie Furberg
Ane Kokkvoll
Jonathan Wells
Tom Wilsgaard
Anne Winther
Guri Skeie
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Research, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2019 05; 14(5):e12492
Date
05-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon - methods
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Weight - physiology
Body Composition
Body mass index
Child
Child Development - physiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Pediatric Obesity - epidemiology - physiopathology
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Fat and fat-free masses and fat distribution are related to cardiometabolic risk.
to explore how birth weight, childhood body mass index (BMI) and BMI gain were related to adolescent body composition and central obesity.
In a population-based longitudinal study, body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 907 Norwegian adolescents (48% girls). Associations between birth weight, BMI categories, and BMI gain were evaluated by fitting linear mixed models and conditional growth models with fat mass index (FMI, kg/m2 ), fat-free mass index (FFMI, kg/m2 ) standard deviation scores (SDS), and central obesity at 15 to 20 years, as well as change in FMI SDS and FFMI SDS between ages 15 to 17 and 18 to 20 as outcomes.
Birth weight was associated with FFMI in adolescence. Greater BMI gain in childhood, conditioned on prior body size, was associated with higher FMI, FFMI, and central overweight/obesity with the strongest associations seen at age 6 to 16.5 years: FMI SDS: ß = 0.67, 95% CI (0.63-0.71), FFMI SDS: 0.46 (0.39, 0.52), in girls, FMI SDS: 0.80 (0.75, 0.86), FFMI SDS: 0.49 (0.43, 0.55), in boys.
Compared with birth and early childhood, high BMI and greater BMI gain at later ages are strong predictors of higher fat mass and central overweight/obesity at 15 to 20 years of age.
PubMed ID
30590874 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age and gender differences in incidence and case fatality trends for myocardial infarction: a 30-year follow-up. The Tromso Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131944
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2012 Oct;19(5):927-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Jan Mannsverk
Tom Wilsgaard
Inger Njølstad
Laila Arnesdatter Hopstock
Maja-Lisa Løchen
Ellisiv B Mathiesen
Dag S Thelle
Knut Rasmussen
Kaare Harald Bønaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Heart Disease, Division of Cardiothoracic and Respiratory Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. jan.mannsverk@unn.no
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2012 Oct;19(5):927-34
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Death Certificates
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting
Heart Arrest - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Although the mortality of coronary heart disease (CHD) has declined in Western countries during the last decades, studies have suggested that the prevention and treatment of CHD may not have been as effective in women as in men. We examined gender- and age-specific trends in incidence, case fatality and the severity of first myocardial infarction (MI) in a large Norwegian population-based study.
Prospective population-based cohort study.
A total of 31,323 participants enrolled between 1974 and 2001 were followed throughout 2004 for a total of 400,572 person-years. Suspected coronary events were adjudicated by a review of hospital records and death certificates. A total of 1669 events fulfilled standardized criteria of first-ever fatal or non-fatal MI.
In the age group 35-79 years, the age-adjusted incidence of MI declined significantly in men, whereas an increase was observed in women. For men and women = 80 years the incidence rates remained unchanged. The severity of MI and the 28-day and 1-year case fatality rates declined significantly and similarly in men and women.
Trends in MI incidence differed by sex and age; in the age group 35-79 years a marked decrease was observed among men but an increase was observed among women, while no change was observed among older patients. MI severity and case fatality were clearly reduced for both sexes. These data suggest that the burden of CHD is shifting from middle-aged men toward middle-aged women and elderly patients.
PubMed ID
21859780 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption, endogenous estrogen and mammographic density among premenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272002
Source
Breast Cancer Res. 2015;17:103
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Hanne Frydenberg
Vidar G Flote
Ine M Larsson
Emily S Barrett
Anne-Sofie Furberg
Giske Ursin
Tom Wilsgaard
Peter T Ellison
Anne McTiernan
Anette Hjartåker
Grazyna Jasienska
Inger Thune
Source
Breast Cancer Res. 2015;17:103
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Estrogens - blood
Female
Humans
Mammary Glands, Human - abnormalities
Norway - epidemiology
Premenopause
Abstract
Alcohol consumption may promote aromatization of androgens to estrogens, which may partly explain the observations linking alcohol consumption to higher breast cancer risk. Whether alcohol consumption is associated with endogenous estrogen levels, and mammographic density phenotypes in premenopausal women remains unclear.
Alcohol consumption was collected by self-report and interview, using semi quantitative food frequency questionnaires, and a food diary during seven days of a menstrual cycle among 202 premenopausal women, participating in the Energy Balance and Breast Cancer Aspects (EBBA) study I. Estrogen was assessed in serum and daily in saliva across an entire menstrual cycle. Computer-assisted mammographic density (Madena) was obtained from digitized mammograms taken between days 7-12 of the menstrual cycle. Multivariable regression models were used to investigate the associations between alcohol consumption, endogenous estrogen and mammographic density phenotypes.
Current alcohol consumption was positively associated with endogenous estrogen, and absolute mammographic density. We observed 18 % higher mean salivary 17ß-estradiol levels throughout the menstrual cycle, among women who consumed more than 10 g of alcohol per day compared to women who consumed less than 10 g of alcohol per day (p = 0.034). Long-term and past-year alcohol consumption was positively associated with mammographic density. We observed a positive association between alcohol consumption (past year) and absolute mammographic density; high alcohol consumers (=7 drinks/week) had a mean absolute mammographic density of 46.17 cm(2) (95 % confidence interval (CI) 39.39, 52.95), while low alcohol consumers (32.4 cm(2)), compared to low (
Notes
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PubMed ID
26246001 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol consumption, types of alcoholic beverages and risk of venous thromboembolism - the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134175
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2011 Aug;106(2):272-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Ida J Hansen-Krone
Sigrid K Brækkan
Kristin F Enga
Tom Wilsgaard
John-Bjarne Hansen
Author Affiliation
Hematological research group in Tromsø (HERG), Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. ida.j.hansen-krone@uit.no
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2011 Aug;106(2):272-8
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Beer
Ethanol - poisoning
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Venous Thromboembolism - etiology - prevention & control
Wine
Abstract
Moderate alcohol consumption has been shown to protect against cardiovascular diseases. The association between alcohol consumption, especially types of alcoholic beverages, and venous thromboembolism (VTE) is less well described. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of alcohol consumption and different alcoholic beverages on risk of VTE. Information on alcohol consumption was collected by a self-administrated questionnaire in 26,662 subjects, aged 25-97 years, who participated in the Tromsø Study, in 1994-1995. Subjects were followed through September 1, 2007 with incident VTE as the primary outcome. There were 460 incident VTE-events during a median of 12.5 years of follow-up. Total alcohol consumption was not associated with risk of incident VTE. However, subjects consuming = 3 units of liquor per week had 53% increased risk of VTE compared to teetotalers in analyses adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, diabetes, cancer, previous cardiovascular disease, physical activity and higher education (HR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.00-2.33). Contrary, subjects with a wine intake of = 3 units/week had 22% reduced risk of VTE (HR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.47-1.30), further adjustment for liquor and beer intake strengthened the protective effect of wine (HR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.30-1.00). Frequent binge drinkers (= 1/week) had a 17% increased risk of VTE compared to teetotallers (HR 1.17, 95% CI: 0.66-2.09), and a 47% increased risk compared to non-binge drinkers (HR 1.47, 95% CI: 0.85-2.54). In conclusion, liquor consumption and binge drinking was associated with increased risk of VTE, whereas wine consumption was possibly associated with reduced risk of VTE.
PubMed ID
21614415 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anthropometric measures of obesity and risk of venous thromboembolism: the Tromso study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147924
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2010 Jan;30(1):121-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Knut H Borch
Sigrid K Braekkan
Ellisiv B Mathiesen
Inger Njølstad
Tom Wilsgaard
Jan Størmer
John-Bjarne Hansen
Author Affiliation
Center for Atherothrombotic Research in Tromsø, Department of Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. knut.borch@fagmed.uit.no
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2010 Jan;30(1):121-7
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity - epidemiology - pathology
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
ROC Curve
Registries
Risk factors
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of various obesity measures on identification of subjects at risk and their respective risk estimates for VTE in a prospective population-based study.
Measures of body composition such as body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), and waist-hip ratio (WHR) were registered in 6708 subjects aged 25 to 84 years, who participated in the Tromsø Study (1994-1995). Incident VTE-events were registered during follow-up until September 1, 2007. There were 222 VTE-events during a median of 12.3 years of follow-up. All measures of obesity exhibited significantly increased HR for VTE in multivariable models with highest risk estimates for WC in both genders. The risk of VTE increased across quartiles of BMI, WC, and HC in both genders, but not for WHR. WC identified more subjects at risk using established criteria for obesity. WC had the highest area under the curve in both genders in ROC analysis, and WC above ROC-derived cut-off values (WC > or =85 cm in women and > or =95 cm in men) were associated with HRs of 1.92 (95% CI: 1.05 to 3.48) in women and 2.78 (95% CI: 1.47 to 5.27) in men.
Our findings indicate that WC is the preferable anthropometric measure of obesity to identify subjects at risk and to predict risk of VTE.
PubMed ID
19834110 View in PubMed
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Are the currently used reference intervals for creatine kinase (CK) reflecting the general population? The Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129782
Source
Clin Chem Lab Med. 2012 May;50(5):879-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Hallvard Lilleng
Stein Harald Johnsen
Tom Wilsgaard
Svein Ivar Bekkelund
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology and Neurophysiology, The University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. hallvard.lilleng@unn.no
Source
Clin Chem Lab Med. 2012 May;50(5):879-84
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood Chemical Analysis - standards
Creatine Kinase - blood
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Reference Values
Abstract
Laboratory reference intervals are not necessarily reflecting the range in the background population. This study compared creatine kinase (CK) reference intervals calculated from a large sample from a Norwegian population with those elaborated by the Nordic Reference Interval Project (NORIP). It also assessed the pattern of CK-normalization after standardized control analyses.
New upper reference limits (URL) CK values were calculated after exclusion of individuals with risk of hyperCKemia and including individuals with incidentally detected hyperCKemia after they had completed a standardized control analysis. After exclusion of 5924 individuals with possible causes of hyperCKemia, CK samples were analyzed in 6904 individuals participating in the 6th survey of The Tromsø Study. URL was defined as the 97.5 percentile.
New URL in women was 207 U/L. In men
PubMed ID
22070220 View in PubMed
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Association of Increasing GFR with Change in Albuminuria in the General Population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276462
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2016 Sep 28;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-28-2016
Author
Toralf Melsom
Vidar Stefansson
Jørgen Schei
Marit Solbu
Trond Jenssen
Tom Wilsgaard
Bjørn O Eriksen
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2016 Sep 28;
Date
Sep-28-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Hyperfiltration at the single-nephron level has been proposed as an early stage of kidney dysfunction of different origins. Evidence supporting this hypothesis in humans is lacking, because there is no method of measuring single-nephron GFR in humans. However, increased whole-kidney GFR in the same individual implies an increased single-nephron GFR, because the number of nephrons does not increase with age. We hypothesized that an increase in GFR would be associated with an increased albumin-to-creatinine ratio in a cohort of the general population.
We measured GFR by iohexol clearance at baseline in 2007-2009 and follow-up after 5.6 years in a representative sample of 1246 persons (aged 50-62 years) who were nondiabetic from the general population of Tromso, northern Norway. Participants were without cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, or diabetes at baseline. We investigated the association between change in GFR and change in albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Increased GFR was defined as a positive change in GFR (change in GFR>0 ml/min) from baseline to follow-up. An albumin-to-creatinine ratio >30 mg/g was classified as albuminuria.
Change in GFR was positively associated with a change in albumin-to-creatinine ratio in the entire cohort in the multiple linear regression. The albumin-to-creatinine ratiofollow-up-to-albumin-to-creatinine ratiobaseline ratio increased by 8.0% (95% confidence interval, 1.4 to 15.0) per SD increase in change in GFR. When participants with increased GFR (n=343) were compared with those with a reduced GFR (n=903), the ratio increased by 16.3% (95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 33.7). The multivariable adjusted odds ratio for incident albuminuria (n=14) was 4.98 (95% confidence interval, 1.49 to 16.13) for those with an increased GFR (yes/no).
Increasing GFR is associated with an increase in albumin-to-creatinine ratio and incident albuminuria in the general nondiabetic population. These findings support single-nephron hyperfiltration as a risk factor for albuminuria in the general population.
PubMed ID
27683625 View in PubMed
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Association of occasional smoking with total mortality in the population-based Tromsø study, 2001-2015.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294424
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 12 28; 7(12):e019107
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-28-2017
Author
Maja-Lisa Løchen
Inger Torhild Gram
Jan Mannsverk
Ellisiv B Mathiesen
Inger Njølstad
Henrik Schirmer
Tom Wilsgaard
Bjarne K Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 12 28; 7(12):e019107
Date
12-28-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Motivation
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
There is a shift in the smoking population from daily smokers to light or occasional smokers. The knowledge about possible adverse health effects of this new smoking pattern is limited. We investigated smoking habits with focus on occasional smoking in relation to total mortality in a follow-up study of a Norwegian general population.
A population study in Tromsø, Norway.
We collected smoking habits and relevant risk factors in 4020 women and 3033 men aged 30-89 years in the Tromsø Study in 2001. The subjects were followed up regarding total mortality through June 2015.
Among the participants, there were 7% occasional smokers. Occasional smokers were younger, more educated and used alcohol more frequently than other participants. A total of 766 women and 882 men died during the follow-up. After the adjustment for confounders, we found that occasional smoking significantly increased mortality by 38% (95% CI 8% to 76%) compared with never smokers. We report a dose-response relationship in the hazards of smoking (daily, occasional, former and never smoking).
Occasional smoking is not a safe smoking alternative. There is a need for information to the general public and health workers about the health hazards of occasional smoking. More work should be done to motivate this often well-educated group to quit smoking completely.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29288187 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of occasional smoking with total mortality in the population-based Tromsø study, 2001-2015.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288019
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 12 28;7(12):e019107
Publication Type
Article
Date
12-28-2017
Author
Maja-Lisa Løchen
Inger Torhild Gram
Jan Mannsverk
Ellisiv B Mathiesen
Inger Njølstad
Henrik Schirmer
Tom Wilsgaard
Bjarne K Jacobsen
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 12 28;7(12):e019107
Date
12-28-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
There is a shift in the smoking population from daily smokers to light or occasional smokers. The knowledge about possible adverse health effects of this new smoking pattern is limited. We investigated smoking habits with focus on occasional smoking in relation to total mortality in a follow-up study of a Norwegian general population.
A population study in Tromsø, Norway.
We collected smoking habits and relevant risk factors in 4020 women and 3033 men aged 30-89 years in the Tromsø Study in 2001. The subjects were followed up regarding total mortality through June 2015.
Among the participants, there were 7% occasional smokers. Occasional smokers were younger, more educated and used alcohol more frequently than other participants. A total of 766 women and 882 men died during the follow-up. After the adjustment for confounders, we found that occasional smoking significantly increased mortality by 38% (95% CI 8% to 76%) compared with never smokers. We report a dose-response relationship in the hazards of smoking (daily, occasional, former and never smoking).
Occasional smoking is not a safe smoking alternative. There is a need for information to the general public and health workers about the health hazards of occasional smoking. More work should be done to motivate this often well-educated group to quit smoking completely.
Notes
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2013 Aug;28(8):659-6723443581
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 May 30;118(14):2165-89656812
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2009 Oct 26;169(19):1742-419858429
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2014 Jan 30;14 :9524479663
Cites: Lancet. 2013 Mar 2;381(9868):708-923465425
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Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2009 Aug;37(2):124-3119589449
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