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Absence of cardiovascular benefits and sportfish consumption among St. Lawrence River anglers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182864
Source
Environ Res. 2003 Nov;93(3):241-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Catherine Godin
Bryna Shatenstein
Gilles Paradis
Tom Kosatsky
Author Affiliation
Département de Médecine Sociale et préventive, Faculté de Médecine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. catherine.godin@bigfoot.com
Source
Environ Res. 2003 Nov;93(3):241-7
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Diet
Dietary Fats
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - pharmacology
Fisheries
Fishes
Humans
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Seasons
Abstract
The benefits of sportfish consumption and omega-3 fatty acid (omega3-FA) intake for cardiovascular risk factors were evaluated in a sample of 112 male fishers from the St. Lawrence River in the Montreal area during the 1996 winter and fall fishing seasons. A questionnaire on fishing practices and fish consumption was administered, and fasting blood samples were collected for lipid and phospholipid determination. Linear regression analyses, which considered the confounding effect of major risk factors, did not show any significant association between measured omega3-FAs or reported fish intake and blood lipids or blood pressure. This study is limited by its low statistical power due to the small sample size and the possibility that the fish eaten by the participants were low in omega3-FAs or that the participants diets contained foods high in cholesterol-raising fat.
PubMed ID
14615233 View in PubMed
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Active and uncontrolled asthma among children exposed to air stack emissions of sulphur dioxide from petroleum refineries in Montreal, Quebec: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124918
Source
Can Respir J. 2012 Mar-Apr;19(2):97-102
Publication Type
Article
Author
Leylâ Deger
Céline Plante
Louis Jacques
Sophie Goudreau
Stéphane Perron
John Hicks
Tom Kosatsky
Audrey Smargiassi
Author Affiliation
Direction de santé publique de l' Agence de las sante services sociaux de Montréal, Université de Montréal, Québec.
Source
Can Respir J. 2012 Mar-Apr;19(2):97-102
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - chemically induced - drug therapy - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects
Infant
Male
Petroleum Pollution - adverse effects
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Little attention has been devoted to the effects on children's respiratory health of exposure to sulphur dioxide (SO2) in ambient air from local industrial emissions. Most studies on the effects of SO(2) have assessed its impact as part of the regional ambient air pollutant mix.
To examine the association between exposure to stack emissions of SO(2) from petroleum refineries located in Montreal's (Quebec) east-end industrial complex and the prevalence of active asthma and poor asthma control among children living nearby.
The present cross-sectional study used data from a respiratory health survey of Montreal children six months to 12 years of age conducted in 2006. Of 7964 eligible households that completed the survey, 842 children between six months and 12 years of age lived in an area impacted by refinery emissions. Ambient SO(2) exposure levels were estimated using dispersion modelling. Log-binomial regression models were used to estimate crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% CIs for the association between yearly school and residential SO(2) exposure estimates and asthma outcomes. Adjustments were made for child's age, sex, parental history of atopy and tobacco smoke exposure at home.
The adjusted PR for the association between active asthma and SO(2) levels was 1.14 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.39) per interquartile range increase in modelled annual SO(2). The effect on poor asthma control was greater (PR=1.39 per interquartile range increase in modelled SO(2) [95% CI 1.00 to 1.94]).
Results of the present study suggest a relationship between exposure to refinery stack emissions of SO(2) and the prevalence of active and poor asthma control in children who live and attend school in proximity to refineries.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22536578 View in PubMed
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Asthma and allergic rhinitis in Quebec children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178654
Source
Can Respir J. 2004 Jul-Aug;11(5):343-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Benoît Lévesque
Marc Rhainds
Pierre Ernst
Anne-Marie Grenier
Tom Kosatsky
Nathalie Audet
Pierre Lajoie
Author Affiliation
Direction régionale de santé publique de Quebec, Beauport, Quebec City. benoit.levesque@inspq.qc.ca
Source
Can Respir J. 2004 Jul-Aug;11(5):343-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
The Health and Social Survey of Quebec Children and Youth, conducted on representative samples of children nine, 13 and 16 years of age, provided data on the prevalence and determinants of asthma and allergic rhinitis in Quebec.
To determine the prevalence of asthma and allergic rhinitis among children in the province of Quebec and to identify the determinants of these pathologies.
Three groups of more than 1100 children aged nine, 13 and 16 years were recruited. Respiratory symptoms were documented using the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire. Questions enquiring about family income, smoking, degree of urbanization of the child's school's location and various variables related to indoor air were also included. The comparisons of proportions were done using the chi2 test.
The prevalence rates for reported history of asthma varied from 14% to 15% depending on the age group. The prevalence of wheezing in the past year was 7% to 8%. Asthma was the primary cause of the limitation of activities due to a health problem in nine- and 13-year-old Quebecers, and the second most common cause in 16-year-old Quebecers. The prevalence of rhinitis, rhinoconjunctivitis and reported history of hay fever increased with age, reaching 28.0%, 15.9% and 21.1%, respectively, in the 16-year-old group. The prevalence of asthma and wheezing was associated with family history and allergies, and inversely related to family income.
The prevalence of childhood asthma is high in the province of Quebec. It is a major cause of the limitation of activities due to a health problem for young Quebecers. A family history of asthma and an atopic predisposition are important determinants in the development of asthma in Quebec.
PubMed ID
15332136 View in PubMed
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Bed bugs and public health: new approaches for an old scourge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114434
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Nov-Dec;103(6):e399-403
Publication Type
Article
Author
Mona Shum
Elizabeth Comack
Taz Stuart
Reg Ayre
Stéphane Perron
Shelley A Beaudet
Tom Kosatsky
Author Affiliation
National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health, Vancouver, BC. mona.shum@bccdc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Nov-Dec;103(6):e399-403
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bedbugs
Canada
Congresses as topic
Ectoparasitic Infestations - prevention & control
Humans
Insect Control - methods
Professional Role
Public Health Practice
Abstract
To share four Canadian cities' experiences with bed bug infestations and to explore public health roles in managing them.
We summarize presentations from a workshop at the 2010 Canadian Public Health Association Conference which examined the re-emergence of bed bugs in Canada and compared management approaches of municipal and public health authorities in four large Canadian cities. We include updates on their activities since the workshop.
Cities across Canada have observed an increase in complaints of bed bug infestations over recent years. Toronto Public Health considers bed bugs to be a threat to health and has been heavily involved in the front-line response to bed bug complaints. In Winnipeg, Montreal and Vancouver, city inspectors are responsible for investigating complaints, and public health plays a supporting or secondary role. We identified factors that may contribute to successful management of bed bugs: sufficient funding, partnerships among many stakeholders, training and education, and surveillance and evaluation.
Various public health agencies in Canadian cities have played key roles in the fight against bed bugs through new initiatives, education, and encouragement and support for others. By working with the public, owners, tenants, the health sector and other stakeholders, public health practitioners can begin to curb the resurgence of bed bugs and the social strains associated with them.
PubMed ID
23618015 View in PubMed
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Childhood asthma surveillance using administrative data: consistency between medical billing and hospital discharge diagnoses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156742
Source
Can Respir J. 2008 May-Jun;15(4):188-92
Publication Type
Article
Author
France Labrèche
Tom Kosatsky
Raymond Przybysz
Author Affiliation
Montreal Department of Public Health, Montreal, Quebec. france.labreche@inspq.qc.ca
Source
Can Respir J. 2008 May-Jun;15(4):188-92
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Feasibility Studies
Fees, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Patient Credit and Collection - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance - methods
Quebec - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The absence of ongoing surveillance for childhood asthma in Montreal, Quebec, prompted the present investigation to assess the validity and practicality of administrative databases as a foundation for surveillance.
To explore the consistency between cases of asthma identified through physician billings compared with hospital discharge summaries.
Rates of service use for asthma in 1998 among Montreal children aged one, four and eight years were estimated. Correspondence between the two databases (physician billing claims versus medical billing claims) were explored during three different time periods: the first day of hospitalization, during the entire hospital stay, and during the hospital stay plus a one-day margin before admission and after discharge ('hospital stay +/- 1 day').
During 1998, 7.6% of Montreal children consulted a physician for asthma at least once and 0.6% were hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of asthma. There were no contemporaneous physician billings for asthma 'in hospital' during hospital stay +/- 1 day for 22% of hospitalizations in which asthma was the primary diagnosis recorded at discharge. Conversely, among children with a physician billing for asthma 'in hospital', 66% were found to have a contemporaneous in-hospital record of a stay for 'asthma'.
Both databases of hospital and medical billing claims are useful for estimating rates of hospitalization for asthma in children. The potential for diagnostic imprecision is of concern, especially if capturing the exact number of uses is more important than establishing patterns of use.
Notes
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Cites: Pediatrics. 2006 Jun;117(6):e1104-1016740813
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1995 Aug;152(2):570-57633709
PubMed ID
18551199 View in PubMed
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Contaminant exposure among women of childbearing age who eat St. Lawrence River sport fish.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186237
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2002 Sep-Oct;57(5):473-81
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sylvie Nadon
Tom Kosatsky
Raymond Przybysz
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Montreal-Centre, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2002 Sep-Oct;57(5):473-81
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Diet Surveys
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Female
Fishes
Follow-Up Studies
Food contamination - analysis
Fresh Water - chemistry
Humans
Male
Mercury Poisoning - blood - etiology
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - blood - poisoning
Quebec
Questionnaires
Seafood - analysis
Sports
Spouses
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Women's health
Abstract
Little information is available concerning the level of consumption and degree of contaminant exposure for North American women of childbearing age who eat sport fish. The authors reanalyzed a 1995-1996 study of Montreal-area (Canada) sport fishers. The authors focused on women sport fishers of childbearing age and male sport fishers who had spouses of childbearing age. The primary research involved an on-site questionnaire about fish consumption, with follow-up assessment of sport fishers estimated to have either the highest or lowest levels of fish-based contaminant exposure. Among the 1,654 interviewees were 100 women less than 45 yr of age who had eaten sport fish for an average of 11 yr; 45% ate fish less than once a month. From the follow-up subsample of high- and low-level consumers, the authors identified 17 women less than 45 yr of age and 25 males whose spouses who were less than 45 yr of age and who consumed similar quantities of sport fish. Among this group of 42, the high-exposure women differed from the low-exposure women with respect to their yearly consumption of freshwater fish, blood mercury levels (median = 6.4 vs. 1.4 microgram/l), and plasma polychlorinated biphenyl congener 99 (median = 10.5 vs. 5.9 microgram/kg plasma lipids). Few Montreal-area women of childbearing age consume local sport fish frequently or for extended periods. However, among the small proportion that consumes sport fish frequently or for extended periods, blood mercury concentrations approach levels of concern for fetal protection.
PubMed ID
12641192 View in PubMed
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Correlates of hot day air-conditioning use among middle-aged and older adults with chronic heart and lung diseases: the role of health beliefs and cues to action.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139395
Source
Health Educ Res. 2011 Feb;26(1):77-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Lucie Richard
Tom Kosatsky
Annie Renouf
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, 2IRSPUM, Université de Montréal, PO Box 6128, Station Centre-ville, QC, Canada H3C 3J7. Lucie.Richard@Umontreal.ca
Source
Health Educ Res. 2011 Feb;26(1):77-88
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Conditioning
Canada
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Heart Failure
Heat Stress Disorders - prevention & control
Hot Temperature
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Extreme ambient heat is a serious public health threat, especially for the elderly and persons with pre-existing health conditions. Although much of the excess mortality and morbidity associated with extreme heat is preventable, the adoption of effective preventive strategies is limited. The study reported here tested the predictive power of selected components of the Health Belief Model for air-conditioning (AC) use among 238 non-institutionalized middle-aged and older adults with chronic heart failure and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease living in Montréal, Canada. Respondents were recruited through clinics (response rate 71%) and interviews were conducted in their homes or by telephone. Results showed that 73% of participants reported having a home air conditioner. The average number of hours spent per 24-hour period in air-conditioned spaces during heat waves was 14.5 hours (SD = 9.4). Exploratory structural equation modeling showed that specific beliefs about the benefits of and drawbacks to AC as well as internal cues to action were predictive of its level of use, whereas the perceived severity of the effects of heat on health was not. The findings are discussed in light of the need to adequately support effective response to extreme heat in this vulnerable population.
PubMed ID
21068164 View in PubMed
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A data-driven approach to setting trigger temperatures for heat health emergencies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121465
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 May-Jun;103(3):227-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sarah B Henderson
Tom Kosatsky
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, Environmental Health Services, Vancouver, BC, Canada. sarah.henderson@bccdc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 May-Jun;103(3):227-30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Climate
Emergencies
Female
Health planning
Heat Stress Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Hot Temperature
Humans
Male
Public Health
Temperature
Abstract
Unprecedentedly hot weather during the summer of 2009 resulted in considerable excess mortality in Greater Vancouver, Canada. Local municipalities and public health authorities requested a rapid, evidence-based recommendation for the temperature above which emergency action plans should be triggered to reduce potentially-avoidable mortality during future events.
Candidate trigger temperatures were identified by examining the coincidence of extreme mortality days with extreme temperature days, using temperatures observed at two regional airports. Days when the two coincided between 2005 and 2009 were defined as historical heat health emergencies. Forecast and observed temperatures were combined in multiple early warning scenarios to retrospectively test the capacity to predict those heat health emergency dates, and results were expressed in terms of true positive (emergency predicted when one occurred) and false positive (emergency predicted when one did not occur) triggers.
Extreme mortality was observed when the 2-day average of maximum temperatures was > or =31 degrees C at the coastal airport and > or =36 degrees C at the inland airport. When observed and forecast temperatures were combined in different early warning scenarios, all historical heat health emergencies were correctly identified in four of twelve cases, with a minimum of two false positive triggers.
A heat health emergency should be triggered for Greater Vancouver when the average of the current day's 14:00 observed temperature and the next day's forecast high is > or =29 degrees C on the coast and/or > or =34 degrees C inland. This condition provided 19 hours of lead time for preparation and was clearly understood by emergency responders and other users.
PubMed ID
22905644 View in PubMed
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Differences in heat-related mortality across four ecological regions with diverse urban, rural, and remote populations in British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113260
Source
Health Place. 2013 Sep;23:48-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Sarah B Henderson
Victoria Wan
Tom Kosatsky
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Services, BC Centre for Disease Control, 655 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4R4, Canada. sarah.henderson@bccdc.ca
Source
Health Place. 2013 Sep;23:48-53
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
Hot Temperature - adverse effects
Humans
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Rural Population
Urban Population
Abstract
Temperature-mortality analyses are challenging in rural and remote communities with small populations, but this information is needed for climate change and emergency planning. The geographic health areas of British Columbia, Canada were aggregated into four ecoregions delineated by microclimatic conditions. Time series models were used to estimate the effect of maximum apparent temperature on daily non-traumatic mortality. The population of the coldest ecoregion was most sensitive to hot weather, while the population of the hottest ecoregion was least sensitive. The effects were consistently strongest in decedents aged less than 75 years. A province-wide total of 815 deaths was attributed to hot weather over the 25-year study period, with 735 deaths in the most populous ecoregion. The framework described could be adapted to other climatically variable regions with urban, rural, and remote populations.
PubMed ID
23747924 View in PubMed
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Differences in lung cancer mortality trends from 1986-2012 by radon risk areas in British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104623
Source
Health Phys. 2014 May;106(5):608-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Sarah B Henderson
Stephen A Rauch
Perry Hystad
Tom Kosatsky
Author Affiliation
*Environmental Health Services, British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, 655 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4R4, Canada; †School of Population and Public Health, The University of British Columbia, 2206 East Mall, Vancouver, BC V5T 1Z3, Canada.
Source
Health Phys. 2014 May;106(5):608-13
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Data Collection
Female
Geography - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Male
Radon - adverse effects
Risk
Smoking - trends
Abstract
Residential exposure to radon gas is associated with increased risk of lung cancer, especially in smokers. Most evidence about the health effects of radon has been derived from meta-analyses on global epidemiologic studies, but administrative data can help public health authorities to explore the local impacts. Eighty health units in British Columbia (BC), Canada, were classified as having low, moderate, or high radon risk using more than 3,800 residential measurements. Vital statistics records were used to identify deaths due to lung cancer and to all natural causes. The annual ratio of lung cancer mortality to all natural mortality was plotted for the 1986-2012 study period for each radon classification. Visualizations were stratified by gender and by smoking prevalence. The overall ratio increased throughout the study period in high radon areas and remained stable in low and moderate radon areas. The increase was most pronounced for females, especially when plots were stratified by smoking prevalence. These limited but interesting findings confirm that radon is one risk factor for lung cancer mortality in BC and that its effects differ across gender and smoking strata. The results would be strengthened by replication, and more rigorous methods are required to assess other contributing factors.
PubMed ID
24670910 View in PubMed
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25 records – page 1 of 3.