Skip header and navigation

4 records – page 1 of 1.

Source
Br J Ophthalmol. 2011 Nov;95(11):1614-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
John Landers
Tim Henderson
Jamie Craig
Source
Br J Ophthalmol. 2011 Nov;95(11):1614-5
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blindness - epidemiology
Female
Glaucoma - epidemiology
Humans
Intraocular Pressure - physiology
Male
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Population Groups - ethnology
Notes
Comment In: Br J Ophthalmol. 2012 Jul;96(7):1041-222180416
Comment On: Br J Ophthalmol. 2011 Jul;95(7):926-3021113072
PubMed ID
21791508 View in PubMed
Less detail

High levels of uncorrected presbyopia among indigenous Australians: a concern and an opportunity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114853
Source
Clin Experiment Ophthalmol. 2013 Apr;41(3):219-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
John Landers
Tim Henderson
Source
Clin Experiment Ophthalmol. 2013 Apr;41(3):219-20
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Male
Myopia - ethnology
Oceanic Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Vision Disorders - ethnology
Visually Impaired Persons - statistics & numerical data
Notes
Comment On: Clin Experiment Ophthalmol. 2013 Apr;41(3):223-3022788689
PubMed ID
23573987 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence and associations of blinding trachoma in indigenous Australians within central Australia: the Central Australian Ocular Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141861
Source
Clin Experiment Ophthalmol. 2010 May;38(4):398-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
John Landers
Tim Henderson
Jamie Craig
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park, SA 5042, Australia. john.landers@bigpond.com
Source
Clin Experiment Ophthalmol. 2010 May;38(4):398-404
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Blindness - epidemiology - etiology
Corneal Opacity - epidemiology - microbiology
Eyelashes
Eyelid Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oceanic Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Trachoma - complications
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine the prevalence and associations of blinding trachoma within the indigenous Australian population living in central Australia.
A total of 1884 individuals aged 20 years or older, living among 30 remote communities within the statistical local area of 'Central Australia', were recruited for this study. This equated to 36% of those aged 20 years or older and 67% of those aged 40 years or older within this district. Participants were recruited as they presented to the eye clinic at each remote community. Anterior segment examination was performed and the rates of trachomatous trichiasis (TT) and trachomatous corneal opacification (CO) were documented. The prevalence of TT and CO in one or both eyes was presented.
There were 6.1% (95% CI 5.0-7.2) (8.3% of those aged 40 years or older) who had TT and 3.3% (95% CI 2.5-4.1) (4.4% of those aged 40 years or older) who had CO. Both TT and CO were associated with advancing age and female sex. Prevalence varied widely between communities, from 0% to 33% for TT and 0% to 27% for CO.
Our study has shown that blinding trachoma remains endemic among indigenous Australians in central Australia. However, compared with previous estimates, the prevalence of TT and CO appears to be decreasing.
Notes
Comment In: Clin Experiment Ophthalmol. 2010 May;38(4):331-220642587
PubMed ID
20665942 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence and associations of diabetic retinopathy in indigenous Australians within central Australia: the Central Australian Ocular Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143385
Source
Clin Experiment Ophthalmol. 2010 May;38(4):393-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
John Landers
Tim Henderson
Sotoodeh Abhary
Jamie Craig
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Flinders Medical Centre, Flinders Drive, Bedford Park, SA 5042, Australia. john.landers@bigpond.com
Source
Clin Experiment Ophthalmol. 2010 May;38(4):393-7
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Diabetes Complications - epidemiology
Diabetic Retinopathy - blood - complications - epidemiology
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Hypertension - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Oceanic Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Vision Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
To determine the prevalence and associations of diabetic retinopathy (DR) within the indigenous Australian population living in central Australia.
1884 individuals aged 20 years or older, living in one of 30 remote communities within the statistical local area of 'central Australia' were recruited for this study. This equated to 36% of those aged 20 years or older and 67% of those aged 40 years or older within this district. Participants were recruited as they presented to the eye clinic at each remote community. Following dilated slit-lamp fundoscopy, the amount of DR in participants with diabetes mellitus (DM) was quantified using the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study criteria. The presence of any DR and vision-threatening DR (clinically significant macular oedema and/or proliferative DR) in one or both eyes was presented.
Of those with diabetes, 22.2% (25.4% of those aged 40 years or older) had any DR and 7.0% (8.4% of those aged 40 years or older) had vision-threatening DR. Both the presence of any DR and vision-threatening DR were associated with advancing age and HbA1c level, but neither subcategory was associated with sex or self-reported hypertension.
Our study has shown similar prevalence rates for DR in indigenous Australians compared with non-indigenous Australians. However, as DM is far more prevalent among indigenous Australians, the proportion of those affected by DR across the population should be considerably higher when compared with non-indigenous Australians.
Notes
Comment In: Clin Experiment Ophthalmol. 2010 May;38(4):331-220642587
PubMed ID
20491807 View in PubMed
Less detail