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Is alcohol binge drinking in early and late pregnancy associated with behavioural and emotional development at age 7 years?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260536
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014 Dec;23(12):1175-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Janni Niclasen
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Katrine Strandberg-Larsen
Thomas William Teasdale
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014 Dec;23(12):1175-80
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affective Symptoms - chemically induced - epidemiology - psychology
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - psychology
Binge Drinking - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - chemically induced - epidemiology - psychology
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mothers - psychology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate associations of maternal binge drinking in early and late pregnancy with child behavioural and emotional development at age seven. It was hypothesised that late exposure is associated with more negative outcomes than early exposure. Differences were expected on the continuous outcome measures, but not on above cutoff scale scores. Data were derived from the Danish National Birth Cohort. Three exposure groups were defined according to binge drinking from three interviews regarding binge episodes in early, middle and late pregnancy. A 'no binge' group included women with no binge episodes reported in any of the interviews, the 'early bingers' reported episodes in the first interview only, and the 'late bingers' in the last part of pregnancy only. The outcome measure was the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) used as continuous externalising/internalising scores and above cutoff hyperactivity/inattention, conduct, emotional and peer problems scores. Only women with full information concerning binge drinking from the three interviews, together with full-scale SDQ information on their children at age seven and being term-born, were included in the study (N = 37,315). After adjustment for maternal education, psychiatric diagnoses, age and smoking, children exposed to binge drinking in early and late pregnancy had significantly higher mean externalizing scores at age seven than unexposed children, an effect albeit much less for early binge drinking (relative change in mean 1.02, CI 1.00-1.05) than for late binge drinking (relative change in mean 1.21, CI 1.04-1.42). No associations were observed for any of the above cutoff outcomes. Exposure to binge drinking in early and late pregnancy is associated with elevated externalising scores, particularly so in late pregnancy. No increased risk for any of the above cutoff scale scores was observed.
PubMed ID
24390718 View in PubMed
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[Nordic accident classification system used in the Danish National Hospital Registration System to register causes of severe traumatic brain injury].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160196
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2007 Nov 5;169(45):3856-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-5-2007
Author
Aase Worsaa Engberg
Elisabeth Irene Penninga
Thomas William Teasdale
Author Affiliation
Hvidovre Hospital, Afdeling for Neurorehabilitering, Bispebjerg Hospital, Klinisk Farmakologisk Enhed. aae@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2007 Nov 5;169(45):3856-60
Date
Nov-5-2007
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - classification
Brain Injuries - classification - etiology - rehabilitation
Denmark
Humans
Norway
Prospective Studies
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The purpose was to illustrate the use of the accident classification system worked out by the Nordic Medico-Statistical Committee (NOMESCO). In particular, registration of causes of severe traumatic brain injury according to the system as part of the Danish National Hospital Registration System was studied.
The study comprised 117 patients with very severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) admitted to the Brain Injury Unit of the University Hospital in Hvidovre, Copenhagen, from 1 October 2000 to 30 September 2002. Prospective NOMESCO coding at discharge was compared to independent retrospective coding based on hospital records, and to coding from other wards in the Danish National Hospital Registration System. Furthermore, sets of codes in the Danish National Hospital Registration System for consecutive admissions after a particular accident were compared.
Identical results of prospective and independent retrospective coding were found for 65% of 588 single codes, and complete sets of codes for the same accident were identical only in 28% of cases. Sets of codes for the first admission in a hospital course corresponded to retrospective coding at the end of the course in only 17% of cases. Accident code sets from different wards, based on the same injury, were identical in only 7% of cases.
Prospective coding by the NOMESCO accident classification system proved problematic, both with regard to correctness and completeness. The system--although logical--seems too complicated compared to the resources invested in the coding. The results of this investigation stress the need for better management and for better instruction to those who carry out the registration.
PubMed ID
18031658 View in PubMed
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Predictive Validity of the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale for Short-Term Suicidal Behavior: A Danish Study of Adolescents at a High Risk of Suicide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291778
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2017 Jul 03; 21(3):455-469
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-03-2017
Author
Paul Maurice Conway
Annette Erlangsen
Thomas William Teasdale
Ida Skytte Jakobsen
Kim Juul Larsen
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2017 Jul 03; 21(3):455-469
Date
Jul-03-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Predictive value of tests
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Suicidal ideation
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Using the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS), we examined the predictive and incremental predictive validity of past-month suicidal behavior and ideation for short-term suicidal behavior among adolescents at high risk of suicide. The study was conducted in 2014 on a sample of 85 adolescents (90.6% females) who participated at follow-up (85.9%) out of the 99 (49.7%) baseline respondents. All adolescents were recruited from a specialized suicide-prevention clinic in Denmark. Through multivariate logistic regression analyses, we examined whether baseline suicidal behavior predicted subsequent suicidal behavior (actual attempts and suicidal behavior of any type, including preparatory acts, aborted, interrupted and actual attempts; mean follow-up of 80.8 days, SD = 52.4). Furthermore, we examined whether suicidal ideation severity and intensity incrementally predicted suicidal behavior at follow-up over and above suicidal behavior at baseline. Actual suicide attempts at baseline strongly predicted suicide attempts at follow-up. Baseline suicidal ideation severity and intensity did not significantly predict future actual attempts over and above baseline attempts. The suicidal ideation intensity items deterrents and duration were significant predictors of subsequent actual attempts after adjustment for baseline suicide attempts and suicidal behavior of any type, respectively. Suicidal ideation severity and intensity, and the intensity items frequency, duration and deterrents, all significantly predicted any type of suicidal behavior at follow-up, also after adjusting for baseline suicidal behavior. The present study points to an incremental predictive validity of the C-SSRS suicidal ideation scales for short-term suicidal behavior of any type among high-risk adolescents.
PubMed ID
27602917 View in PubMed
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Psychometric properties of the Danish Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire: the SDQ assessed for more than 70,000 raters in four different cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126515
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(2):e32025
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Janni Niclasen
Thomas William Teasdale
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Anne Mette Skovgaard
Hanne Elberling
Carsten Obel
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. Janni.niclasen@psy.ku.dk
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(2):e32025
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Emotions
Female
Humans
Male
Models, Theoretical
Observer Variation
Parents
Principal Component Analysis
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Schools
Abstract
The Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) is a brief behavioural five factor instrument developed to assess emotional and behavioural problems in children and adolescents. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the psychometric properties for parent and teacher ratings in the Danish version of SDQ for different age groups of boys and girls.
The Danish versions of the SDQ were distributed to a total of 71,840 parent and teacher raters of 5-, 7- and 10- to 12-year-old children included in four large scale Danish cohorts. The internal reliability was assessed and exploratory factor analyses were carried out to replicate the originally proposed five factor structure. Mean scores and percentiles were examined in order to differentiate between low, medium and high levels of emotional and behavioural difficulties.
The original five factor structure could be substantially confirmed. The Conduct items however did not solely load on the proposed Conduct scale and the Conduct scale was further contaminated by non-conduct items. Positively worded items tended to load on the Prosocial scale. This was more so the case for teachers than for parents. Parent and teacher means and percentiles were found to be lower compared to British figures but similar to or only slightly lower than those found in the other Nordic countries. The percentiles for girls were generally lower than for boys, markedly so for the teacher hyperactivity ratings.
The study supports the usefulness of the SDQ as a screening tool for boys and girls across age groups and raters in the general Danish population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22384129 View in PubMed
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Suicide in Relation to the Experience of Stressful Life Events: A Population-Based Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293091
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2017 Oct-Dec; 21(4):544-555
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Rita Fjeldsted
Thomas William Teasdale
Martin Jensen
Annette Erlangsen
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2017 Oct-Dec; 21(4):544-555
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Bereavement
Case-Control Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Divorce - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Exposure to Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Information Storage and Retrieval
Life Change Events
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Prisoners - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Prisons
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - psychology
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
Stressful life events have been associated with high risk of suicidal behavior. The aim of this study was to examine whether persons who died by suicide in Denmark had more frequently been exposed to stressful life events, specifically divorce, death of a close relative, exposure to violence, and imprisonment, when compared to gender and age-matched controls. Data from Danish national registers were obtained for the period of 2000-2010 and a nested case-control design was applied. The association between exposure to stressful life events and suicide was examined using logistic regression analysis. In all, 7,115 suicides were identified during the 11 years of follow-up. For each of these, 20 age- and gender-matched controls were randomly selected (n?=?142,300). Cases who died by suicide had an odds ratio of 9.3 (CI-95%: 7.8-11.0) of having been exposed to imprisonment five or more times when compared to controls. People who died by suicide had 1.5-fold (CI-95%: 1.3-1.6) higher risk of having experienced a divorce. Stressful life events, such as divorce and imprisonment, were more frequent in temporal proximity to the date of death among the suicide cases than for end of exposure for controls (p?
PubMed ID
27849449 View in PubMed
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