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Adherence to national diabetes guidelines through monitoring quality indicators--A comparison of three types of care for the elderly with special emphasis on HbA1c.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271560
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2015 Aug;9(4):253-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Ann-Sofie Nilsson Neumark
Lars Brudin
Thomas Neumark
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2015 Aug;9(4):253-60
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Guideline Adherence - standards
Health Services for the Aged - standards
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Home Care Services
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Independent living
Male
Nursing Homes
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - standards
Prevalence
Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To compare adherence to Swedish guidelines for diabetes care between elderly people living at home with or without home health care, and residents of nursing homes.
Medical records of 277 elderly people aged 80 and older, with known diabetes in a Swedish municipality, were monitored using quality indicators to evaluate processes and outcomes.
Monitoring, in accordance to diabetes guidelines, of HbA1c, lipids, blood pressure and foot examinations was lower among residents of nursing homes (p
PubMed ID
25865853 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic prescribing in primary care by international medical graduates and graduates from Swedish medical schools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270259
Source
Fam Pract. 2015 Jun;32(3):343-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Thomas Neumark
Lars Brudin
Sigvard Mölstad
Source
Fam Pract. 2015 Jun;32(3):343-7
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Drug Utilization - standards - statistics & numerical data
Education, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Electronic Health Records
Female
Foreign Medical Graduates - standards - statistics & numerical data
Geography
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - standards - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Schools, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Abstract
Studies of antibiotic prescribing related to diagnosis comparing prescribers trained abroad with those trained in Sweden are lacking.
To determine whether general practices (GPs) and GP residents trained abroad had different prescribing patterns for antibiotics for common infections than those trained in Sweden using retrospective data from electronic patient records from primary health care in Kalmar County, Sweden.
Consultations with an infection diagnosis, both with and without the prescription of antibiotics to 67 GPs and residents trained in Western Europe outside Sweden and other countries, were compared with a matched control group trained in Sweden.
For 1 year, 44101 consultations of patients with an infection diagnosis and 16276 prescriptions of antibiotics were registered. Foreign-trained physicians had 20% more visits compared with physicians trained in Sweden. The prescription of antibiotics per visit and physician in the respective groups, and independent of diagnosis, did not significantly differ between groups, when scaled down from number of consultations to number of prescribing physicians.
There were minor and non-significant differences in antibiotic prescribing comparing GPs and residents trained abroad and in Sweden, most likely the result of an adaptation to Swedish conditions. Nevertheless, no group prescribed antibiotics in accordance to national guidelines. The results suggest that interventions are needed to reduce irrational antibiotic prescribing patterns, targeting all physicians working in Swedish primary health care.
PubMed ID
25715961 View in PubMed
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