Skip header and navigation

Refine By

13 records – page 1 of 2.

Adherence to psychotropic medication in completed suicide in Sweden 2006-2013: a forensic-toxicological matched case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310406
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2019 Oct; 75(10):1421-1430
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2019
Author
Jonas Forsman
Heidi Taipale
Thomas Masterman
Jari Tiihonen
Antti Tanskanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. jonas.forsman@ki.se.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2019 Oct; 75(10):1421-1430
Date
Oct-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Medication Adherence
Middle Aged
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Registries
Suicide, Completed - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate the influence of adherence to psychotropic medications upon the risk of completed suicide by comparing person-level prescriptions and postmortem toxicological findings among complete-suicide cases and non-suicide controls in Sweden 2006-2013.
Using national registries with full coverage on dispensed prescriptions, results of medico-legal autopsies, causes of death, and diagnoses from inpatient care, estimated continuous drug use for 30 commonly prescribed psychotropic medications was compared with forensic-toxicological findings. Subjects who had died by suicide (cases) were matched (1:2) with subjects who had died of other causes (controls) for age, sex, and year of death. Odds ratios were calculated using logistic regression to estimate the risk of completed suicide conferred by partial adherence and non-adherence to pharmacotherapy. Adjustments were made for previous inpatient care and the ratio of initiated and discontinued dispensed prescriptions, a measure of the continued need of treatment preceding death.
In 5294 suicide cases and 9879 non-suicide controls, after adjusting for the dispensation ratio and other covariates, partial adherence and non-adherence to antipsychotics were associated with 6.7-fold and 12.4-fold risks of completed suicide, respectively, whereas corresponding risk estimates for antidepressant treatment were not statistically significant and corresponding risk increases for incomplete adherence to antidepressant treatment were lower (1.6-fold and 1.5-fold, respectively) and lacked statistical significance.
After adjustment for the need of treatment, biochemically verified incomplete adherence to antipsychotic pharmacotherapy was associated with markedly increased risks of completed suicide.
PubMed ID
31218371 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of a CD40 ligand dinucleotide microsatellite in multiple sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52287
Source
Eur J Immunogenet. 2002 Apr;29(2):81-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Y. Dai
Thomas Masterman
W. Huang
J. Hillert
Author Affiliation
Division of Neurology, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, S-141 86 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Immunogenet. 2002 Apr;29(2):81-5
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
CD40 Ligand - genetics
Dinucleotide Repeats - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Leukocytes
Male
Multiple Sclerosis - genetics
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Genetic
RNA, Messenger - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
In recent years, numerous reports have described the diverse roles of the CD40-CD40 ligand receptor-ligand pair. The interaction of these two cell-surface molecules regulates both humoral and cell-mediated immune functions. Because the CD40 ligand is known to be highly expressed on the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, and because activated helper T cells expressing CD40 ligand have been found in the brain sections of MS patients, but not in those of normal controls, the protein is believed to be involved in MS development. We studied the influence of a polymorphic dinucleotide-repeat marker located in the 3' untranslated region of the X-linked gene encoding CD40 ligand (CD40LG) on susceptibility to and disease severity in MS. From a total cohort of 771 Nordic definite-MS patients, the most (n = 92) and least (n = 90) disabled octiles, as well as random samples of intermediately disabled males (n = 119) and females (n = 121), were genotyped; 135 ethnically matched healthy subjects were used as controls. In addition, the effect of the polymorphism on CD40 ligand mRNA expression was assessed using PBMC from 54 MS patients and 22 controls. The phenotype frequencies for the CD40LG marker did not differ significantly between gender-conditioned intermediate-MS subgroups and controls, or between gender-conditioned disability octiles. Nor did the polymorphism appear to exert any significant effect on mRNA expression in either patients or controls.
PubMed ID
11918631 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association analysis of the LAG3 and CD4 genes in multiple sclerosis in two independent populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167185
Source
J Neuroimmunol. 2006 Nov;180(1-2):193-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Frida Lundmark
Hanne F Harbo
Elisabeth G Celius
Janna Saarela
Pameli Datta
Annette Oturai
Cecilia M Lindgren
Thomas Masterman
Hugh Salter
Jan Hillert
Author Affiliation
Division of Neurology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. frida.lundmark@ki.se
Source
J Neuroimmunol. 2006 Nov;180(1-2):193-8
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antigens, CD - genetics - immunology
Antigens, CD4 - genetics - immunology
Biological Markers - metabolism
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
DNA Mutational Analysis
Denmark - epidemiology
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gene Frequency - genetics
Genetic Markers - genetics - immunology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Genetic Testing
Humans
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology - genetics - immunology
Norway - epidemiology
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Predictive value of tests
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We have investigated the genetic involvement of the CD4 and the LAG3 genes, two appealing candidates for MS due to their suggested role in MS pathology. We genotyped a Swedish case-control material consisting of 920 MS patients and 778 controls in an initial study of CD4, three SNPs showed a significant association with MS. An independent material consisting of 1720 Nordic MS patients and 1416 controls were used for confirmation of associated markers in CD4 and to do a confirmative study of the LAG3 gene from previous findings. The result, including a total of 2640 MS patients and 2194 controls shows no significant association with CD4 and LAG3 and MS. We conclude that these genes are of minor importance in regard of genetic predisposition to the MS.
PubMed ID
17020785 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impact of cerebrospinal-fluid oligoclonal immunoglobulin bands and HLA-DRB1 risk alleles on brain magnetic-resonance-imaging lesion load in Swedish multiple sclerosis patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120805
Source
J Neuroimmunol. 2013 Jan 15;254(1-2):170-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-2013
Author
Virginija Danylaite Karrenbauer
Robert Prejs
Thomas Masterman
Jan Hillert
Anna Glaser
Kerstin Imrell
Author Affiliation
MS Research Unit, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. virginija.karrenbauer@ki.se
Source
J Neuroimmunol. 2013 Jan 15;254(1-2):170-3
Date
Jan-15-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Brain - pathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
HLA-DRB1 Chains - genetics
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - cerebrospinal fluid - genetics - pathology
Oligoclonal Bands - cerebrospinal fluid
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Approximately 95% of Nordic multiple sclerosis (MS) patients display oligoclonal immunoglobulin G bands (OCB) in the cerebrospinal fluid. From a cohort of 2094 MS patients we retrieved well-characterized data from 40 OCB-negative and 60 OCB-positive patients, in an effort to determine whether lesion load on brain magnetic resonance imaging is affected by OCB status and carriage of HLA-DRB1*15 or HLA-DRB1*04. Positivity for OCB did not increase the risk of belonging to higher-lesion-load groups; nor did carrying HLA-DRB1*15 or HLA-DRB1*04. A trend was seen, however, whereby OCB positivity conferred a two-fold risk of displaying higher lesion loads infratentorially.
PubMed ID
22967351 View in PubMed
Less detail

Infection during childhood and the risk of violent criminal behavior in adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311078
Source
Brain Behav Immun. 2020 05; 86:63-71
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
05-2020
Author
Åsa Blomström
Kyriaki Kosidou
Marianne Kristiansson
Thomas Masterman
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Centre for Psychiatry Research, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: asa.blomstrom@ki.se.
Source
Brain Behav Immun. 2020 05; 86:63-71
Date
05-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Cohort Studies
Criminal Behavior
Female
Humans
Infections - epidemiology - psychology
Male
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Infections during brain development appear to contribute to cognitive impairment and aggressive behavior, as well as to a number of developmental mental disorders closely associated with violent criminal behavior. Yet, no study has thus far ever investigated whether infections during brain development increases the risk of violent criminality later in life. In this population-based cohort study, about 2.2 million individuals born in Sweden between the years 1973 and 1995 were included in an effort to estimate the association between infections during childhood (registered ICD-10 diagnoses of infections incurred before the age of 14?years) and violent criminal behavior (registered convictions for a violent crime between the ages of 15 and 38?years, prior to December 31, 2011). After inclusion of several sociodemographic parameters, risks of violent criminal behavior conferred by childhood infections - expressed as hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) - were calculated by means of Cox regression. Mediation analyses were performed to explore the effect of psychiatric disorders on the association between infections during childhood and violent criminality. Results revealed a modest, yet significant, association between an infection during childhood and violent criminality later in life (adjusted HR 1.14, 95% CI 1.12-1.16). Infections during the first year of life and infections in the central nervous system were associated with the highest risks of subsequent violent criminality (adjusted HR 1.20, 95% CI 1.18-1.23, and adjusted HR 1.17, 95% CI 1.08-1.26, respectively). The association was partly mediated by the presence of a psychiatric disorder. In summary, independent of a wide range of covariates, our results suggest that infections during brain development could be part of the genesis of violent criminal behavior.
PubMed ID
30807840 View in PubMed
Less detail

Injury-Related Healthcare Use and Risk of Filicide Victimization: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297876
Source
J Forensic Sci. 2019 Jan; 64(1):166-170
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Björn Bäckström
Jonatan Hedlund
Thomas Masterman
Joakim Sturup
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation/Forensic Medicine, Umeå University, PO Box 7616, SE-907 12, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
J Forensic Sci. 2019 Jan; 64(1):166-170
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Ambulatory Care - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Crime Victims - statistics & numerical data
Female
Homicide - statistics & numerical data
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Registries
Risk
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
Research on child-related risk factors for filicide is scant. We investigated whether prior healthcare use for injury (including poisoning) influences filicide risk. Victims (0-14 years; n = 71) were identified in a national autopsy database for the years 1994-2012 and compared to matched, general population controls (n = 355). Healthcare use data were retrieved from a national patient registry. Risks were estimated using odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). For females, prior inpatient care for injury conferred a statistically significant sevenfold risk (OR = 6.67 [95% CI: 1.49-29.79]), and any prior injury-related healthcare use conferred a statistically significant fourfold risk (OR = 3.57 [95% CI: 1.13-11.25]), of filicide victimization. No statistically significant risks were found for males. Healthcare personnel should be aware that children treated for injuries, especially females, may be at an elevated risk of filicide victimization. Nevertheless, the filicide base rate remains low, and parents may be stigmatized by unfounded alerts; thus, prudent reflection should precede reports to the authorities.
PubMed ID
30184269 View in PubMed
Less detail

Intra- and extra-familial child homicide in Sweden 1992-2012: A population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279157
Source
J Forensic Leg Med. 2016 Apr;39:91-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Jonatan Hedlund
Thomas Masterman
Joakim Sturup
Source
J Forensic Leg Med. 2016 Apr;39:91-9
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Autism Spectrum Disorder - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Criminals - statistics & numerical data
Family
Female
Homicide - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Previous studies have shown decreasing child homicide rates in many countries - in Sweden mainly due to a drop in filicide-suicides. This study examines the rate of child homicides during 21 years, with the hypothesis that a decline might be attributable to a decrease in the number of depressive filicide offenders (as defined by a proxy measure). In addition, numerous characteristics of child homicide are presented. All homicide incidents involving 0-14-year-old victims in Sweden during 1992-2012 (n = 90) were identified in an autopsy database. Data from multiple registries, forensic psychiatric evaluations, police reports, verdicts and other sources were collected. Utilizing Poisson regression, we found a 4% annual decrease in child homicides, in accordance with prior studies, but no marked decrease regarding the depressive-offender proxy. Diagnoses from forensic psychiatric evaluations (n = 50) included substance misuse (8%), affective disorders (10%), autism-spectrum disorders (18%), psychotic disorders (28%) and personality disorders (30%). Prior violent offences were more common among offenders in filicides than filicide-suicides (17.8% vs. 6.9%); and about 20% of offenders in each group had previously received psychiatric inpatient care. Aggressive methods of filicide predominated among fathers. Highly lethal methods of filicide (firearms, fire) were more commonly followed by same-method suicide than less lethal methods. Interestingly, a third of the extra-familial offenders had an autism-spectrum disorder. Based on several findings, e.g., the low rate of substance misuse, the study concludes that non-traditional risk factors for violence must be highlighted by healthcare providers. Also, the occurrence of autism-spectrum disorders in the present study is a novel finding that warrants further investigation.
PubMed ID
26871306 View in PubMed
Less detail

Multiple sclerosis and psychiatric disorders: comorbidity and sibling risk in a nationwide Swedish cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267449
Source
Mult Scler. 2014 Dec;20(14):1881-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Viktoria Johansson
Cecilia Lundholm
Jan Hillert
Thomas Masterman
Paul Lichtenstein
Mikael Landén
Christina M Hultman
Source
Mult Scler. 2014 Dec;20(14):1881-91
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Siblings
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Psychiatric disorders are known to be prevalent in multiple sclerosis (MS).
The objective of this paper is to study comorbidity between MS and bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and depression in a nationwide cohort and to determine whether shared genetic liability underlies the putative association.
We identified ICD-diagnosed patients with MS (n = 16,467), bipolar disorder (n = 30,761), schizophrenia (n = 22,781) and depression (n = 172,479) in the Swedish National Patient Register and identified their siblings in the Multi-Generation Register. The risk of MS was compared in psychiatric patients and in matched unexposed individuals. Shared familial risk between MS and psychiatric disorders was estimated by sibling comparison.
The risk of MS was increased in patients with bipolar disorder (hazard ratio (HR) 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-2.2, p
Notes
Comment In: Mult Scler. 2014 Dec;20(14):1803-525520402
PubMed ID
25013151 View in PubMed
Less detail

No influence on disease progression of non-HLA susceptibility genes in MS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133092
Source
J Neuroimmunol. 2011 Aug 15;237(1-2):98-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2011
Author
Wangko Lundström
Eva Greiner
Frida Lundmark
Helga Westerlind
Cathrine Smestad
Aslaug R Lorentzen
Ingrid Kockum
Jenny Link
Boel Brynedal
Elisabeth G Celius
Hanne F Harbo
Thomas Masterman
Jan Hillert
Author Affiliation
The Multiple Sclerosis Research group, Centre for Molecular Medicine, Department of Clinical neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. wangko.lundstrom@ki.se
Source
J Neuroimmunol. 2011 Aug 15;237(1-2):98-100
Date
Aug-15-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antigens, Differentiation, T-Lymphocyte - genetics - immunology
Antigens, Surface - genetics - immunology
Disease Progression
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - ethnology - genetics
HLA Antigens - immunology
Humans
Interleukin-2 Receptor alpha Subunit - genetics - immunology
Lectins, C-Type - genetics - immunology
Male
Monosaccharide Transport Proteins - genetics - immunology
Multiple Sclerosis - genetics - immunology - pathology
Norway - epidemiology
Proteins - genetics - immunology
Receptors, Interleukin-7 - genetics - immunology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Recently, several non-HLA loci have been shown to be convincingly associated with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) susceptibility, assumingly indicating important pathways in the pathogenesis. A genotype influence on disease outcome measures by these genes would support a role of these pathways in ongoing tissue damage. Here, however, we report a consistent dissociation between causation and progression for five non-HLA genotypes (IL7R, IL2RA, CLEC16A, CD226 and SH2B3) in 1776 Scandinavian MS patients.
PubMed ID
21742385 View in PubMed
Less detail

Pre-offense alcohol intake in homicide offenders and victims: A forensic-toxicological case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291963
Source
J Forensic Leg Med. 2018 May; 56:55-58
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-2018
Author
Jonatan Hedlund
Jonas Forsman
Joakim Sturup
Thomas Masterman
Author Affiliation
Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, and National Board of Forensic Medicine, Box 4044, SE-141 04 Huddinge, Sweden. Electronic address: jonatan.hedlund@ki.se.
Source
J Forensic Leg Med. 2018 May; 56:55-58
Date
May-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Central Nervous System Depressants - blood
Crime Victims - statistics & numerical data
Criminals - statistics & numerical data
Databases, Factual
Ethanol - blood
Female
Homicide
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Alcohol is associated with violent behavior, although little is known regarding to what extent alcohol increases homicide risk. We aimed to estimate risks of homicide offending and victimization conferred by the presence of ethanol in blood by using toxicological data from homicide victims and offenders and from controls who had died in vehicle-related accidents.
From nationwide governmental registries and databases, forensic-toxicological results were retrieved for victims (n?=?200) and offenders (n?=?105) of homicides committed during the years 2007-2009 and individuals killed in vehicle-related accidents (n?=?1629) during the years 2006-2014. Ethanol levels in blood exceeding 0.01?g/100?ml were considered positive.
Using logistic regression, we found that the presence of ethanol in blood conferred a significantly increased risk of homicide offending (age-adjusted odds ratio [aOR]?=?3.6, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]?=?2.3-5.6) and homicide victimization (aOR?=?2.1, 95% CI?=?1.4-3.0). After stratification by sex, risk estimates in females were about 3-fold greater than in males for both homicide offending ([aOR?=?11.0, 95% CI?=?2.4-49.8] versus [aOR?=?3.1, 95% CI?=?1.9-4.9]) and victimization ([aOR?=?5.4, 95% CI?=?2.4-12.2] versus [aOR?=?1.7, 95% CI?=?1.1-2.8]). Sensitivity analyses yielded similar estimates.
The results of the present study are consistent with prior findings suggesting alcohol to be an important risk factor for homicide offending and victimization. Surprisingly, however, associations were more pronounced in females, although additional studies that control for potential confounders are warranted to facilitate speculations about causality.
PubMed ID
29533206 View in PubMed
Less detail

13 records – page 1 of 2.