Skip header and navigation

Refine By

14 records – page 1 of 2.

An exploration of the patient navigator role: perspectives of younger women with breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105501
Source
Oncol Nurs Forum. 2014 Jan 1;41(1):77-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2014
Author
Allison E Pedersen
Thomas F Hack
Susan E McClement
Jill Taylor-Brown
Author Affiliation
Winnipeg Regional Health Authority Palliative Care Program.
Source
Oncol Nurs Forum. 2014 Jan 1;41(1):77-88
Date
Jan-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Age Factors
Anxiety - etiology
Breast Neoplasms - nursing - psychology
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Oncology Nursing
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Navigation
Patient Participation
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Role
Social Support
Social Work
Uncertainty
Young Adult
Abstract
To delineate the role of the oncology patient navigator, drawing from the experiences and descriptions of younger women with breast cancer.
Interpretive, descriptive, qualitative research design.
Participants' homes, researcher's home, and via telephone, all in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
12 women aged 50 years or younger who were diagnosed with breast cancer within the last three years.
Face-to-face semistructured interviews explored patient experiences with the cancer care system, including problems encountered, unmet needs, and opinions about the functions of the patient navigator role. The audio-recorded interviews were transcribed and data were broken down and inductively coded into four categories. Constant comparative techniques also were used during analysis.
The role of the oncology patient navigator included two facets: "Processual facets," with the subthemes assigned to me at diagnosis, managing the connection, mapping the process, practical support, and quarterbacking my entire journey; and "Personal qualities: The essentials," with the subthemes empathetic care tenor, knowing the cancer system, and understanding the medical side of breast cancer.
Despite the tremendous effort directed toward enhancing care for younger women undergoing treatment for breast cancer, gaps continue to exist. Younger women with breast cancer require a care approach providing ongoing dialogue, teaching, and emotional support from the point of diagnosis through treatment, including transitions of care within the oncology setting and back to their primary care practitioner.
Oncology nurse navigators are well positioned to provide patients with anticipatory guidance from diagnosis to the end of treatment.
Notes
Comment In: Oncol Nurs Forum. 2014 Jan 1;41(1):89-9124368242
PubMed ID
24368241 View in PubMed
Less detail

The British Columbia Patient Navigation Model: a critical analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136655
Source
Oncol Nurs Forum. 2011 Mar;38(2):200-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Allison E Pedersen
Thomas F Hack
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba, Canada. alli.pedersen@gmail.com
Source
Oncol Nurs Forum. 2011 Mar;38(2):200-6
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Culture
Humans
Models, Nursing
Neoplasms - nursing - psychology
Nurse's Role
Oncology Nursing - methods
Philosophy, Nursing
Social Support
Abstract
To provide a critical analysis of a patient navigation model using the Synthesized Method of Theory Evaluation and the Criterion-Based Critique as frameworks for the analysis.
English-language research and clinical articles and Internet sources (CINAHL®, PubMed, and Googleâ„¢ Scholar) on patient navigation up to April 2009.
The British Columbia Patient Navigation Model (BCPNM) is a practical model developed from a psychosocial perspective. The BCPNM highlights the functions of the navigator for patients with cancer and is patient and family centered.
The BCPNM provides a comprehensive framework for current patient navigation programs and can facilitate the development of future models.
The BCPNM is a useful model for nursing practice because it identifies and clearly highlights numerous functions that nurses provide. The model can serve as a guide for nurses who provide psychosocial interventions in a variety of oncology environments.
PubMed ID
21356657 View in PubMed
Less detail

Burden to others and the terminally ill.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162607
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2007 Nov;34(5):463-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Harvey Max Chochinov
Linda J Kristjanson
Thomas F Hack
Thomas Hassard
Susan McClement
Mike Harlos
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. harvey.chochinov@cancercare.mb.ca
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2007 Nov;34(5):463-71
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Cost of Illness
Female
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Neoplasms - complications
Neuropsychological Tests
Palliative Care
Stress, Psychological - etiology - psychology
Terminal Care - psychology
Abstract
Studies of patients who are terminally ill consistently identify strong associations between "sense of burden to others" and marked end-of-life distress. However, little research has addressed the issue of burden to others among patients nearing death. The aim of this study was to carefully examine "burden to others" and clarify its relationship with various psychosocial, physical, and existential issues arising in patients who are terminally ill. A cohort of 211 patients with end-stage cancer was assessed, using an assortment of validated psychometrics to document psychosocial, physical, and existential aspects of their end-of-life experience. This included an assessment of their sense of "burden to others." Forty percent of participants indicated a negligible sense of burden to others, scoring within the lowest quarter on an ordinal measure of "burden to others;" 25% scored within the second lowest quarter; 12% within the third quarter; and 23% within the highest or most severe range. The most highly correlated variables with "sense of burden to others" included depression (r=0.460; df=201, P
PubMed ID
17616329 View in PubMed
Less detail

Citation analysis of Canadian psycho-oncology and supportive care researchers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106716
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2014 Feb;22(2):315-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Thomas F Hack
Dauna Crooks
James Plohman
Emma Kepron
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2014 Feb;22(2):315-24
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bibliometrics
Canada
Databases, Factual
Humans
Medical Oncology
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Palliative Care
Periodicals as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Publishing - statistics & numerical data
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to conduct a historical review of psycho-oncology and supportive care research in Canada using citation analysis and to review the clinical impact of the research conducted by the most highly cited researchers.
The lifetime journal publication records of 109 psycho-oncology and supportive care researchers in Canada were subject to citation analysis using the Scopus database, based on citations since 1996 of articles deemed relevant to psychosocial oncology and supportive care, excluding self-citations. Three primary types of analysis were performed for each individual: the number of citations for each journal publication, a summative citation count of all published articles, and the Scopus h-index.
The top 20 psycho-oncology/supportive care researchers for each of five citation categories are presented: the number of citations for all publications; the number of citations for first-authored publications; the most highly cited first-authored publications; the Scopus h-index for all publications; and the Scopus h-index for first-authored publications. The three most highly cited Canadian psycho-oncology researchers are Dr. Kerry Courneya (University of Alberta), Dr. Lesley Degner, (University of Manitoba), and Dr. Harvey Chochinov (University of Manitoba).
Citation analysis is useful for examining the research performance of psycho-oncology and supportive care researchers and identifying leaders among them.
PubMed ID
24122384 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dignity therapy: a feasibility study of elders in long-term care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127040
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2012 Mar;10(1):3-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Harvey Max Chochinov
Beverley Cann
Katherine Cullihall
Linda Kristjanson
Mike Harlos
Susan E McClement
Thomas F Hack
Tom Hassard
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada. harvey.chochinov@cancercare.mb.ca
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2012 Mar;10(1):3-15
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - psychology - therapy
Caregivers - psychology
Feasibility Studies
Female
Frail Elderly - psychology
Humans
Long-Term Care - psychology
Male
Manitoba
Memory, Episodic
Middle Aged
Narration
Palliative Care - psychology
Personhood
Psychotherapy - methods
Rehabilitation Centers
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of dignity therapy for the frail elderly.
Participants were recruited from personal care units contained within a large rehabilitation and long-term care facility in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Two groups of participants were identified; residents who were cognitively able to directly take part in dignity therapy, and residents who, because of cognitive impairment, required that family member(s) take part in dignity therapy on their behalf. Qualitative and quantitative methods were applied in determining responses to dignity therapy from direct participants, proxy participants, and healthcare providers (HCPs).
Twelve cognitively intact residents completed dignity therapy; 11 cognitively impaired residents were represented in the study by way of family member proxies. The majority of cognitively intact residents found dignity therapy to be helpful; the majority of proxy participants indicated that dignity therapy would be helpful to them and their families. In both groups, HCPs reported the benefits of dignity therapy in terms of changing the way they perceived the resident, teaching them things about the resident they did not previously know; the vast majority indicated that they would recommend it for other residents and their families.
This study introduces evidence that dignity therapy has a role to play among the frail elderly. It also suggests that whether residents take part directly or by way of family proxies, the acquired benefits--and the effects on healthcare staff--make this area one meriting further study.
PubMed ID
22329932 View in PubMed
Less detail

Elevating the uses of storytelling approaches within Indigenous health research: a critical and participatory scoping review protocol involving Indigenous people and settlers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304253
Source
Syst Rev. 2020 11 04; 9(1):257
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-04-2020
Author
Kendra L Rieger
Sarah Gazan
Marlyn Bennett
Mandy Buss
Anna M Chudyk
Lillian Cook
Sherry Copenace
Cindy Garson
Thomas F Hack
Bobbie Hornan
Tara Horrill
Mabel Horton
Sandra Howard
Janice Linton
Donna Martin
Kim McPherson
Jennifer Moore Rattray
Wanda Phillips-Beck
Rebecca Sinclair
Annette S H Schultz
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Trinity Western University, Langley, Canada. Kendra.Rieger@twu.ca.
Source
Syst Rev. 2020 11 04; 9(1):257
Date
11-04-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
There is a complicated and exploitative history of research with Indigenous peoples and accompanying calls to meaningfully and respectfully include Indigenous knowledge in healthcare. Storytelling approaches that privilege Indigenous voices can be a useful tool to break the hold that Western worldviews have within the research. Our collaborative team of Indigenous and non-Indigenous researchers, and Indigenous patients, Elders, healthcare providers, and administrators, will conduct a critical participatory, scoping review to identify and examine how storytelling has been used as a method in Indigenous health research.
Guided by two-eyed seeing, we will use Bassett and McGibbon's adaption of Arksey and O'Malley's scoping review methodology. Relevant articles will be identified through a systematic search of the gray literature, core Indigenous health journals, and online databases including Scopus, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, AgeLine, Academic Search Complete, Bibliography of Native North Americans, Canadian Reference Centre, and PsycINFO. Qualitative and mixed-methods research articles will be included if the researchers involved Indigenous participants or their healthcare professionals living in Turtle Island (i.e., Canada and the USA), Australia, or Aotearoa (New Zealand); use storytelling as a research method; focus on healthcare phenomena; and are written in English. Two reviewers will independently screen titles/abstracts and full-text articles. We will extract data, identify the array of storytelling approaches, and critically examine how storytelling was valued and used. An intensive collaboration will be woven throughout all review stages as academic researchers co-create this work with Indigenous patients, Elders, healthcare professionals, and administrators. Participatory strategies will include four relational gatherings throughout the project. Based on our findings, we will co-create a framework to guide the respectful use of storytelling as a method in Indigenous health research involving Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples.
This work will enable us to elucidate the extent, range, and nature of storytelling within Indigenous health research, to critically reflect on how it has been and could be used, and to develop guidance for the respectful use of this method within research that involves Indigenous peoples and settlers. Our findings will enable the advancement of storytelling methods which meaningfully include Indigenous perspectives, practices, and priorities to benefit the health and wellbeing of Indigenous communities.
Open Science Framework ( https://osf.io/rvf7q ).
PubMed ID
33148328 View in PubMed
Less detail

Health care provider communication: an empirical model of therapeutic effectiveness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117011
Source
Cancer. 2013 May 1;119(9):1706-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2013
Author
Harvey M Chochinov
Susan E McClement
Thomas F Hack
Nancy A McKeen
Amanda M Rach
Pierre Gagnon
Shane Sinclair
Jill Taylor-Brown
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. harvey.chochinov@cancercare.mb.ca
Source
Cancer. 2013 May 1;119(9):1706-13
Date
May-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cancer Care Facilities - manpower
Communication
Empirical Research
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - therapy
Professional-Patient Relations
Abstract
Patients who are facing life-threatening and life-limiting cancer almost invariably experience psychological distress. Responding effectively requires therapeutic sensitivity and skill. In this study, we examined therapeutic effectiveness within the setting of cancer-related distress with the objective of understanding its constituent parts.
Seventy-eight experienced psychosocial oncology clinicians from 24 health care centers across Canada were invited to participate in 3 focus groups each. In total, 29 focus groups were held over 2 years, during which clinicians articulated the therapeutic factors deemed most helpful in mitigating patient psychosocial distress. The content of each focus group was summarized into major themes and was reviewed with participants to confirm their accuracy. Upon completion of the focus groups, workshops were held in various centers, eliciting participant feedback on an empirical model of therapeutic effectiveness based on the qualitative analysis of focus group data.
Three primary, interrelated therapeutic domains emerged from the data, forming a model of optimal therapeutic effectiveness: 1) personal growth and self-care (domain A), 2) therapeutic approaches (domain B), and 3) creation of a safe space (domain C). Areas of domain overlap were identified and labeled accordingly: domain AB, therapeutic humility; domain BC, therapeutic pacing; and domain AC, therapeutic presence.
This empirical model provides detailed insights regarding the elements and pedagogy of effective communication and psychosocial care for patients who are experiencing cancer-related distress.
Notes
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 1999 Oct;35(11):1592-710673967
Cites: J Palliat Med. 2012 Sep;15(9):998-100522946576
Cites: Aust Fam Physician. 2000 Nov;29(11):1022-511127057
Cites: Psychooncology. 2001 Jan-Feb;10(1):19-2811180574
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2002 Feb;54(3):433-4311824919
Cites: Lancet Oncol. 2001 Aug;2(8):499-50511905726
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2003 Feb;23(1):1-3312559992
Cites: Palliat Med. 2003 Sep;17(6):527-3714526887
Cites: Palliat Med. 2003 Dec;17(8):688-9414694920
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2004 Jun 14;90(12):2297-30415162149
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 1998 Aug;28(2):345-529725732
Cites: Psychooncology. 2004 Oct;13(10):700-815386643
Cites: Med Educ. 2005 Jul;39(7):742-5015960795
Cites: Nurs Outlook. 2005 May-Jun;53(3):134-4015988450
Cites: Psychooncology. 2005 Oct;14(10):831-45; discussion 846-716200519
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2007 Mar 26;96(6):868-7417311020
Cites: J Clin Oncol. 2007 May 1;25(13):1691-717470861
Cites: Clin J Oncol Nurs. 2007 Jun;11(3):413-817623625
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2008 Aug;18(8):1049-6118650561
Cites: Psychother Res. 2008 Sep;18(5):508-2218816002
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2008 Dec;36(6):559-7118579340
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2009 Feb;29(1):47-5618952334
Cites: Support Care Cancer. 2009 Nov;17(11):1417-2319283411
Cites: Support Care Cancer. 2010 Feb;18(2):255-6319609571
Cites: J Support Oncol. 2010 Jan-Feb;8(1):4-1220235417
Cites: Psychother Res. 2010 Nov;20(6):627-4620737352
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2011 Mar;82(3):389-9521257280
Cites: Psychooncology. 2011 Jun;20(6):594-60021305646
Cites: Psychooncology. 2011 Jun;20(6):601-821308857
Cites: Psychotherapy (Chic). 2010 Mar;47(1):20-722401997
Comment In: Cancer. 2013 May 1;119(9):1609-1023341022
PubMed ID
23341092 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impact of providing audiotapes of primary treatment consultations to men with prostate cancer: a multi-site, randomized, controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167364
Source
Psychooncology. 2007 Jun;16(6):543-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Thomas F Hack
Tom Pickles
Barry D Bultz
J Dean Ruether
Lesley F Degner
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. thack@sbrc.ca
Source
Psychooncology. 2007 Jun;16(6):543-52
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Communication
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Participation
Patient satisfaction
Physician-Patient Relations
Prostatic Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Quality of Life
Radiation Oncology
Referral and Consultation
Tape Recording
Abstract
The purpose of this investigation was to systematically examine the efficacy of providing men with prostate cancer with an audiotape of their primary treatment consultation.
Participants included 425 men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer and 15 radiation oncologists from 4 cancer centers in Canada. Patients were block randomized to one of four consultation groups: 1. Standard care control--not audio-taped; 2. Audio-taped--no audiotape given; 3. Audio-taped--patient given audiotape; and 4. Audio-taped--patient offered choice of receiving audiotape or not (4 patients declined; 94 accepted). Patient outcomes were measured at 12 weeks post-consultation: perceived degree of information provision; audiotape satisfaction and use; communication satisfaction with oncologist; mood state; and cancer-specific quality of life.
Patients receiving the consultation audiotape reported having been provided with significantly more disease and treatment information in general (p=0.04), and more information about treatment alternatives (p=0.04) and treatment side effects (p=0.01) in particular, than patients who did not receive the audiotape. Audiotape benefit was not significantly related to patient satisfaction with communication, mood state or quality of life at 12 weeks post-consultation, and was not significantly affected by choice of receiving the audiotape. Patients rated the audiotape intervention positively, with an average score of 83.0 out of 100.
Consultation audiotapes are rated highly by men with prostate cancer, and these audiotapes help to enhance their perception of having been provided with critical disease- and treatment-related information.
PubMed ID
16991107 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Patient Dignity Inventory: applications in the oncology setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121035
Source
J Palliat Med. 2012 Sep;15(9):998-1005
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Harvey Max Chochinov
Susan E McClement
Thomas F Hack
Nancy A McKeen
Amanda M Rach
Pierre Gagnon
Shane Sinclair
Jill Taylor-Brown
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Manitoba Palliative Care Research Unit, Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. harvey.chochinov@cancercare.mb.ca
Source
J Palliat Med. 2012 Sep;15(9):998-1005
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Medical Oncology - manpower - methods
Neoplasms - psychology
Palliative Care - psychology
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Reproducibility of Results
Right to Die
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - psychology
Terminally Ill - psychology
Abstract
The Patient Dignity Inventory (PDI) is a novel 25-item psychometric instrument, designed to identify multiple sources of distress (physical, functional, psychosocial, existential, and spiritual) commonly seen in patients who are terminally ill. It was also designed to help guide psychosocial clinicians in their work with patients. While its validity and reliability have been studied within the context of palliative care, its utility in clinical settings has not as yet been examined.
The purpose of this study was to determine how psychosocial oncology professionals would use the PDI with within their practice and what utility it might have across the broad spectrum of cancer.
Between October 2008 and January 2009, psychosocial oncology clinicians from across Canada were invited to use the PDI to determine their impressions of this approach in identifying distress and informing their practice.
Ninety participants used the PDI and submitted a total of 429 feedback questionnaires detailing their experience with individual patients. In 76% of instances, the PDI revealed one or more previously unreported concerns; in 81% of instances, clinicians reported that the PDI facilitated their work. While it was used in a wide range of circumstances, clinicians were more inclined to apply the PDI to patients engaged in active treatment or palliation, rather than those in remission, having recently relapsed, or newly diagnosed. Besides its utility in identifying distress, the PDI enabled clinicians to provide more targeted therapeutic responses to areas of patient concern.
While this study suggests various clinical applications of the PDI, it also provides an ideal forerunner for research that will directly engage patients living with cancer.
PubMed ID
22946576 View in PubMed
Less detail

Personality, neuroticism, and coping towards the end of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167333
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2006 Oct;32(4):332-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Harvey Max Chochinov
Linda J Kristjanson
Thomas F Hack
Thomas Hassard
Susan McClement
Mike Harlos
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. harvey.chochinov@cancercare.mb.ca
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2006 Oct;32(4):332-41
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Female
Humans
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology - psychology
Neurotic Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Personality
Risk Assessment - methods
Terminally Ill - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The influence of personality characteristics on how patients cope with various challenges at the end of life has not been extensively studied. In order to examine the association between end-of-life experience and neuroticism (defined within the personality literature as a trait tendency to experience psychological distress), a measure of neuroticism was administered to a cohort of dying cancer patients. Various other measures of physical, psychological, and existential distress were also measured to explore their possible connection to patient personality style. The personality characteristic neuroticism demonstrated a significant relationship with several end-of-life sources of distress, including depression, anxiety, sense of dignity, quality of life (rating and satisfaction), hopelessness, concentration, and outlook on the future. Neuroticism appears to have a significant association with the dying experience. This association is expressed across the psychological, existential and, to a lesser extent, physical and social domains of end-of-life distress. This may help clinicians identify vulnerable individuals who are most likely to have poorer adjustments and may benefit from earlier targeted interventional approaches. Exploring the relationship between various facets of personality and end-of-life distress, and mapping this information against optimal therapeutic responses, remains the challenge for future research broaching this intriguing and largely ignored area of palliative care.
PubMed ID
17000350 View in PubMed
Less detail

14 records – page 1 of 2.