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Cross-cultural psychometric testing of the Care Dependency Scale with data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184722
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2003 Jul;43(2):181-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Ate Dijkstra
Mick Coleman
Concepcion Tomas
Maritta Välimäki
Theo Dassen
Author Affiliation
Northern Centre For Healthcare Research, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. ate.dijkstra@znb.nl
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2003 Jul;43(2):181-7
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dependency (Psychology)
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Great Britain
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Nursing Assessment - methods
Observer Variation
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Spain
Abstract
The importance of the present study lies in addressing whether it is justified to compare the care dependency status of older patients from different settings and cultures using the same instrument.
The aim of this international study was to compare the psychometric properties of the Care Dependency Scale (CDS) by analysing data gathered in Finland, Spain and the United Kingdom (UK).
The Finnish, Spanish and UK research instruments were translations of the original Dutch CDS. Psychometric evaluations of this were carried out for each country separately as well as for the three countries combined, based on a convenience sample of 378 older patients.
High alpha coefficients between 0.94 and 0.97 were obtained. Subsequent test-retest and interrater reliability revealed moderate to almost perfect kappa values.
One of the main outcomes of the international comparison was that the findings between the three countries showed more similarities than differences in psychometric assessment, indicating that the CDS can be used for care dependency assessment in different countries.
PubMed ID
12834376 View in PubMed
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Maintaining privacy on post-natal wards: a study in five European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191462
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2002 Jan;37(2):145-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Maritta Välimäki
Theo Dassen
Maria Gasull
Chryssoula Lemonidou
P Anne Scott
Marianne Arndt
Anne Kaljonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, University of Turku, Turku, Finland, Researcher, Department of Nursing, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. helena.leino-kilpi@utu.fi
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2002 Jan;37(2):145-54
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Ethics, Nursing
Female
Finland
Germany
Greece
Hospital Units - organization & administration
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Maternal-Child Nursing - education - methods
Mothers - psychology
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Patients' Rooms - organization & administration
Personal Space
Postnatal Care - methods - psychology
Questionnaires
Scotland
Spain
Abstract
Maintaining privacy on post-natal wards: a study in five European countries Aim. To describe how mothers' privacy is maintained on post-natal wards in five European countries: Finland, Spain, Greece, Germany and Scotland [United Kingdom (UK)]
Privacy is an important concept in nursing and nursing ethics. Empirical studies in this field, however, are few. In this study, privacy is defined as comprising both physical and social-informational dimensions and both the perceptions of mothers and professional were investigated.
The data were collected by a questionnaire from mothers (n=1192) and midwife/nursing staff (n=952).
The results revealed differences both between the different countries and between patients' and professionals' views. Mothers in Finland, Germany and Scotland felt their privacy was maintained better than mothers in Greece and Spain. The differences in staff perceptions are less clear-cut. Different background factors emerge as statistically significant in different countries.
Empirical studies in privacy are important and give ideas about the problems in nursing practice. Future analyses should look also at other areas of nursing.
PubMed ID
11851782 View in PubMed
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Perceptions of autonomy in the care of elderly people in five European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186761
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2003 Jan;10(1):28-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
P Anne Scott
Maritta Välimäki
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Theo Dassen
Maria Gasull
Chryssoula Lemonidou
Marianne Arndt
Anja Schopp
Riitta Suhonen
Anne Kaljonen
Author Affiliation
University of Stirling, UK.
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2003 Jan;10(1):28-38
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Finland
Geriatric Nursing - standards
Germany
Greece
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - psychology
Patient Participation
Personal Autonomy
Questionnaires
Scotland
Spain
Abstract
The focus of this article is perceptions of elderly patients and nurses regarding patients' autonomy in nursing practice. Autonomy is empirically defined as having two components: information received/given as a prerequisite and decision making as the action. The results indicated differences between staff and patient perceptions of patient autonomy for both components in all five countries in which this survey was conducted. There were also differences between countries in the perceptions of patients and nurses regarding the frequency with which patients received information from nursing staff or were offered opportunities to make decisions. This is the second of a set of five articles published together in this issue of Nursing Ethics in which the results of this comparative research project are presented.
PubMed ID
12572758 View in PubMed
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Perceptions of autonomy, privacy and informed consent in the care of elderly people in five European countries: comparison and implications for the future.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186758
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2003 Jan;10(1):58-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Maritta Välimäki
Theo Dassen
Maria Gasull
Chryssoula Lemonidou
P Anne Scott
Anja Schopp
Marianne Arndt
Anne Kaljonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland. Helena.Leino-Kilpi@utu.fi
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2003 Jan;10(1):58-66
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Finland
Forecasting
Geriatric Nursing - standards - trends
Germany
Greece
Humans
Informed Consent - standards
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - psychology
Personal Autonomy
Privacy - psychology
Scotland
Spain
Abstract
This article discusses nurses' and elderly patients' perceptions of the realization of autonomy, privacy and informed consent in five European countries. Comparisons between the concepts and the countries indicated that both nurses and patients gave the highest ratings to privacy and the lowest to informed consent. There were differences between countries. According to the patient data, autonomy is best realized in Spain, privacy in the UK (Scotland), and informed consent in Finland. For the staff data, the best results tended to concentrate in the UK. The conceptual and methodological limitations of the study are identified and discussed. Implications of the results are divided into three areas: nursing practice, education and research. In practice, the analysis of patients' values and the ethical sensitivity of nurses are important as part of ethically good care. In nurse education, students should learn to recognize ethical problems, generally and particularly, among vulnerable groups of patients. Multicultural international research is needed in this area. This is the last of a set of five articles published together in this issue of Nursing Ethics in which the results of this comparative research project are presented.
PubMed ID
12572761 View in PubMed
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Perceptions of autonomy, privacy and informed consent in the care of elderly people in five European countries: general overview.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186762
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2003 Jan;10(1):18-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Maritta Välimäki
Theo Dassen
Maria Gasull
Chryssoula Lemonidou
Anja Schopp
P Anne Scott
Marianne Arndt
Anne Kaljonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland. Helena.Leino-Kilpi@utu.fi
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2003 Jan;10(1):18-27
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Ethics, Nursing
Female
Finland
Geriatric Nursing - standards
Germany
Greece
Humans
Informed consent
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Personal Autonomy
Privacy
Questionnaires
Scotland
Spain
Abstract
Ethical issues in the care of elderly people have been identified in many countries. We report the findings of a comparative research project funded by the European Commission, which took place between 1998 and 2001. The project explored the issues of autonomy (part I), privacy (part II) and informed consent (part III) in nursing practice. Data were collected from elderly residents/patients (n = 573) and nursing staff (n = 887) in five European countries: Finland, Spain, Greece, Germany and the UK (Scotland). Questionnaires were used as the data collection tool (self-completion questionnaires for staff, structured interviews for the elderly participants). Four basic nursing interventions in the care of elderly people were targeted: hygiene, fluid intake and nutrition, medication, and elimination. The data were analysed statistically. The results indicated differences within all five countries between staff and patient perceptions of autonomy, privacy and informed consent. There were also similar differences between individual countries. Conclusions were reached concerning practice, education and research. This is the first of a set of five articles published together in this issue of Nursing Ethics in which the results of this comparative research project are presented.
PubMed ID
12572757 View in PubMed
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Perceptions of informed consent in the care of elderly people in five European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186759
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2003 Jan;10(1):48-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Anja Schopp
Maritta Välimäki
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Theo Dassen
Maria Gasull
Chryssoula Lemonidou
P Anne Scott
Marianne Arndt
Anne Kaljonen
Author Affiliation
Humbolt University, Berlin, Germany.
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2003 Jan;10(1):48-57
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Age Factors
Aged - psychology
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Geriatric Nursing - standards
Germany
Greece
Humans
Informed Consent - standards
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - psychology
Scotland
Spain
Abstract
The focus of this article is on elderly patients' and nursing staff perceptions of informed consent in the care of elderly patients/residents in five European countries. The results suggest that patients and nurses differ in their views on how informed consent is implemented. Among elderly patients the highest frequency for securing informed consent was reported in Finland; the lowest was in Germany. In contrast, among nurses, the highest frequency was reported in the UK (Scotland) and the lowest in Finland. In a comparison of patients' and nurses' perceptions, nurses had more positive views than patients in all countries except Finland. Patients with less need for nursing interventions in Greece and Spain gave their consent less often. The German and Greek patients were older, and the results also point to an association between this and their lower frequency of giving consent. In Spain, patients who were married or who had a family member or friend to look after their personal affairs were more likely to be included in the group whose consent was sought less often. This is the fourth of a set of five articles published together in this issue of Nursing Ethics in which the results of this comparative research project are presented.
PubMed ID
12572760 View in PubMed
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Perceptions of privacy in the care of elderly people in five European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186760
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2003 Jan;10(1):39-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Anja Schopp
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Maritta Välimäki
Theo Dassen
Maria Gasull
Chryssoula Lemonidou
P Anne Scott
Marianne Arndt
Anne Kaljonen
Author Affiliation
Humbolt University, Berlin, Germany.
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2003 Jan;10(1):39-47
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged - psychology
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Geriatric Nursing - standards
Germany
Greece
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - psychology
Privacy - psychology
Questionnaires
Scotland
Spain
Abstract
The focus of this article is on elderly patients' and nursing staff perceptions of privacy in the care of elderly patients/residents in five European countries. Privacy includes physical, social and informational elements. The results show that perceptions of privacy were strongest in the UK (Scotland) and weakest in Greece. Country comparisons revealed statistically significant differences between the perceptions of elderly patients and also between those of nurses working in the same ward or long-term care facility. Perceptions of privacy by patients and their nursing staff were quite similar in Finland, Germany and the UK. In contrast, in Greece and Spain these perceptions were different: nurses believed that they took account of their patients' privacy needs more often than the patients themselves felt this was the case. Among Spanish and UK patients, an association was found between lower levels of independence and comparatively less positive perceptions of privacy. No associations were established between nurses' perceptions and their demographic factors. This is the third of a set of five articles published together in this issue of Nursing Ethics in which the results of this comparative research project are presented.
PubMed ID
12572759 View in PubMed
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Self-determination in surgical patients in five European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176707
Source
J Nurs Scholarsh. 2004;36(4):305-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Maritta Välimäki
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Matti Grönroos
Theo Dassen
Maria Gasull
Chryssoula Lemonidou
P Anne Scott
Marianne Benedicta Arndt
Author Affiliation
University of Turku, Department of Nursing Science, 20014 Turku, Finland. numava@uta.fi
Source
J Nurs Scholarsh. 2004;36(4):305-11
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Decision Making
Female
Finland
Germany
Greece
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health status
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Nurse's Role
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Patient Participation - methods - psychology
Perioperative Nursing - methods
Personal Autonomy
Questionnaires
Scotland
Social Support
Spain
Surgical Procedures, Operative - nursing - psychology
Abstract
To analyze the effects of informational support, desire for behavioral involvement in health decision-making (behavioral involvement), opportunities to make decisions, and independence on subjective health status in surgical patients. A theoretical model of self-determination was applied and tested.
The data were collected by structured questionnaires with a sample of 1,454 surgical patients in five European countries. LISREL analyses were used to test the theoretical causal model of self-determination.
Patients' perceptions of informational support received from nursing professionals and their desired involvement in health decision-making affected patients' opportunities to make decisions and further their independence level, which in turn affected patients' subjective health status.
Understanding of factors that increase self-determination in patients can help health care professionals to promote patients' well-being.
PubMed ID
15636409 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.