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Developing human capital: what is the impact on nurse turnover?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149019
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2009 Sep;17(6):739-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Kent V Rondeau
Eric S Williams
Terry H Wagar
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. kent.rondeau@ualberta.ca
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2009 Sep;17(6):739-48
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Career Mobility
Education, Nursing, Continuing - organization & administration
Forecasting
Hospitals - manpower
Humans
Inservice Training - organization & administration
Least-Squares Analysis
Marketing of Health Services
Multivariate Analysis
Nurse Administrators - organization & administration - psychology
Nursing Administration Research
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Homes - manpower
Nursing Staff - education - organization & administration - psychology
Personnel Loyalty
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Staff Development - organization & administration
Abstract
To investigate the impact that increasing human capital through staff training makes on the voluntary turnover of registered nurses.
Healthcare organizations in Canada, the United Kingdom, the United States, and Australia are experiencing turbulent nursing labour markets characterized by extreme staff shortages and high levels of turnover. Organizations that invest in the development of their nursing human resources may be able to mitigate high turnover through the creation of conditions that more effectively develop and utilize their existing human capital.
A questionnaire was sent to the chief nursing officers of 2208 hospitals and long-term care facilities in every province and territory of Canada yielding a response rate of 32.3%. The analysis featured a three-step hierarchical regression with two sets of control variables.
After controlling for establishment demographics and local labour market conditions, perceptions of nursing human capital and the level of staff training provided were modestly associated with lower levels of establishment turnover.
and implications for Nursing Management The results suggest that healthcare organizations that have made greater investments in their nursing human capital are more likely to demonstrate lower levels of turnover of their registered nursing personnel.
PubMed ID
19694917 View in PubMed
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Labour-management forums and workplace performance. Evidence from union officials in health care organizations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186990
Source
J Manag Med. 2002;16(6):408-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Terry H Wagar
Kent V Rondeau
Author Affiliation
Department of Management, St Mary's University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
J Manag Med. 2002;16(6):408-21
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada
Committee Membership
Consumer Satisfaction
Data Collection
Efficiency, Organizational
Health Services Administration - trends
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Labor Unions - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Leadership
Organizational Culture
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Task Performance and Analysis
Workplace
Abstract
Many health care workplaces are adopting more cooperative labour-management relations, spurred in part by sweeping changes in the economic environment that have occurred over the last decade. Labour-management cooperation is seen as essential if health care organizations are to achieve their valued performance objectives. Joint labour-management committees (LMCs) have been adopted in many health care workplaces as a means of achieving better industrial relations. Using data from a sample of Canadian union leaders in the health care sector, this paper examines the impact of labour-management forums and labour climate on employee and organizational outcomes. Research results suggest that labour climate is less important in predicting workplace performance (and change in workplace performance) than is the number of LMCs in operation. However, labour climate is found to be at least as important in predicting union member satisfaction (and change in member satisfaction) as is the wide adoption of LMCs in operation. These findings are consistent with the notion that the greater use of LMCs is associated with augmented workplace performance (and a positive change in workplace performance), notwithstanding the contribution of the labour climate in the workplace.
PubMed ID
12534164 View in PubMed
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Managing the workforce reduction: hospital CEO perceptions of organizational dysfunction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189835
Source
J Healthc Manag. 2002 May-Jun;47(3):161-76; discussion 176-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kent V Rondeau
Terry H Wagar
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. kent.rondeau@ualberta.ca
Source
J Healthc Manag. 2002 May-Jun;47(3):161-76; discussion 176-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Chief Executive Officers, Hospital - psychology
Conflict (Psychology)
Decision Making, Organizational
Health Services Research
Hospital Restructuring - manpower - organization & administration
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Leadership
Morale
Organizational Culture
Personnel Downsizing
Personnel, Hospital - supply & distribution
Abstract
Over the past few years many nations have undertaken activities aimed at restructuring and reengineering their health system as a means of achieving greater cost effectiveness and consumer responsiveness. Most efforts at reforming healthcare delivery have been accompanied by the downsizing of healthcare organizations. Organizations that are undergoing decline or significant workforce contractions are widely believed to experience a number of negative or dysfunctional attributes as a consequence of reductions in, or redeployments of, their labor force. For organizations undergoing planned workforce reductions, much speculation has been made in an attempt to identify a set of "best practices" that have the potential to mitigate the dysfunctional consequences associated with large permanent reductions in the workforce. This article explores the relationships among workforce-reduction practices and perceptions of organizational dysfunction in a large sample of Canadian hospitals. Results of the analysis suggest that the application of certain "progressive" workforce-reduction practices preceding, during, and subsequent to the downsizing process may play an important role in mitigating some of these dysfunctional organizational consequences. This research provides some evidence to suggest that how a workforce reduction is carried out may have a greater effect on organizational effectiveness than either the magnitude or severity of the overall workforce reduction.
PubMed ID
12055899 View in PubMed
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Nurse and resident satisfaction in magnet long-term care organizations: do high involvement approaches matter?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169893
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2006 Apr;14(3):244-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Kent V Rondeau
Terry H Wagar
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. kent.rondeau@ualberta.ca
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2006 Apr;14(3):244-50
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Choice Behavior
Decision Making, Organizational
Employment - organization & administration - psychology
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Least-Squares Analysis
Long-Term Care - organization & administration - psychology
Morale
Multivariate Analysis
Nursing Administration Research
Nursing Homes - organization & administration
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - organization & administration - psychology
Organizational Culture
Patient satisfaction
Personnel Selection - organization & administration
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Professional Autonomy
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Workplace - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
This study examines the association of high involvement nursing work practices with employer-of-choice (magnet) status in a sample of Canadian nursing homes.
In response to a severe shortage of registered nursing personnel, it is imperative for health care organizations to more effectively recruit and retain nursing personnel. Some long-term care organizations are developing employee-centred cultures that allow them to effectively enhance nurse and resident satisfaction. At the same time, many nursing homes have adopted progressive nursing workplace practices (high involvement work practices) that emphasize greater employee empowerment, participation and commitment.
A mail survey was sent to the director of nursing in 300 nursing homes in western Canada. In total, 125 useable questionnaires were returned and constituted the data set for this study. Separate ordinary least squares regressions are performed with magnet strength, nurse satisfaction and resident satisfaction used as dependent variables.
Nursing homes that demonstrate strong magnet (employer-of-choice) characteristics are more likely to have higher levels of nurse and patient satisfaction, even after controlling for a number of significant factors at the establishment level. Magnet nursing homes are more likely to have progressive participatory decision-making cultures and much more likely to spend considerable resources on job-related training for their nursing staff. The presence of high involvement work practices is not found to be a significant predictor in magnet strength, nurse or resident satisfaction.
Merely adopting more high involvement nursing work practices may be insufficient for nursing homes, which desire to become 'employers-of-choice' in their marketplaces, especially if these practices are adopted without a concomitant investment in nurse training or an enhanced commitment to establishing a more democratic and participatory decision-making style involving all nursing staff.
PubMed ID
16600014 View in PubMed
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Turnover and vacancy rates for registered nurses: do local labor market factors matter?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159736
Source
Health Care Manage Rev. 2008 Jan-Mar;33(1):69-78
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kent V Rondeau
Eric S Williams
Terry H Wagar
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. kent.rondeau@ualberta.ca
Source
Health Care Manage Rev. 2008 Jan-Mar;33(1):69-78
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Career Mobility
Employment - economics - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals - manpower
Humans
Least-Squares Analysis
National Health Programs
Nursing Homes - manpower
Nursing Staff - supply & distribution
Personnel Turnover - economics - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Abstract
Turnover of nursing staff is a significant issue affecting health care cost, quality, and access. In recent years, a worldwide shortage of skilled nurses has resulted in sharply higher vacancy rates for registered nurses in many health care organizations. Much research has focused on the individual, group, and organizational determinants of turnover. Labor market factors have also been suggested as important contributors to turnover and vacancy rates but have received limited attention by scholars.
This study proposes and tests a conceptual model showing the relationships of organization-market fit and three local labor market factors with organizational turnover and vacancy rates.
The model is tested using ordinary least squares regression with data collected from 713 Canadian hospitals and nursing homes.
Results suggest that, although modest in their impact, labor market and the organization-market fit factors do make significant yet differential contributions to turnover and vacancy rates for registered nurses.
Knowledge of labor market factors can substantially shape an effective campaign to recruit and retain nurses. This is particularly true for employers who are perceived to be "employers-of-choice."
PubMed ID
18091446 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.