Skip header and navigation

Refine By

13 records – page 1 of 2.

The 2006 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part II - Therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168976
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):583-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2006
Author
N A Khan
Finlay A McAlister
Simon W Rabkin
Raj Padwal
Ross D Feldman
Norman Rc Campbell
Lawrence A Leiter
Richard Z Lewanczuk
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Michael D Hill
Malcolm Arnold
Gordon Moe
Tavis S Campbell
Carol Herbert
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Ellen Burgess
B. Hemmelgarn
Charlotte Jones
Pierre Larochelle
Richard I Ogilvie
Robyn Houlden
Robert J Herman
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
George Carruthers
Bruce Culleton
Jacques Dechamplain
George Pylypchuk
Alexander G Logan
Norm Gledhill
Robert Petrella
Sheldon Tobe
Rhian M Touyz
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):583-93
Date
May-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Alcohol Drinking
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Canada
Cerebrovascular Disorders - therapy
Diabetes Mellitus - therapy
Diet
Exercise
Humans
Hypertension - therapy
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - therapy
Kidney Diseases - therapy
Life Style
Magnesium - administration & dosage
Myocardial Ischemia - therapy
Patient compliance
Potassium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Sodium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control
Weight Loss
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the management of hypertension in adults.
For lifestyle and pharmacological interventions, evidence from randomized, controlled trials and systematic reviews of trials was preferentially reviewed. Changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were the primary outcomes of interest. For lifestyle interventions, blood pressure (BP) lowering was accepted as a primary outcome given the lack of long-term morbidity/mortality data in this field. For treatment of patients with kidney disease, the development of proteinuria or worsening of kidney function was also accepted as a clinically relevant primary outcome.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2004 to October 2005 to update the 2005 recommendations. In addition, reference lists were scanned and experts were contacted to identify additional published studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently by content and methodological experts using prespecified levels of evidence.
Lifestyle modifications to prevent and/or treat hypertension include the following: perform 30 min to 60 min of aerobic exercise four to seven days per week; maintain a healthy body weight (body mass index of 18.5 kg/m2 to 24.9 kg/m2) and waist circumference (less than 102 cm for men and less than 88 cm for women); limit alcohol consumption to no more than 14 standard drinks per week in men or nine standard drinks per week in women; follow a diet that is reduced in saturated fat and cholesterol and that emphasizes fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products; restrict salt intake; and consider stress management in selected individuals. Treatment thresholds and targets should take into account each individual's global atherosclerotic risk, target organ damage and comorbid conditions. BP should be lowered to less than 140/90 mmHg in all patients, and to less than 130/80 mmHg in those with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease (regardless of the degree of proteinuria). Most adults with hypertension require more than one agent to achieve these target BPs. For adults without compelling indications for other agents, initial therapy should include thiazide diuretics. Other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for diastolic hypertension with or without systolic hypertension include beta-blockers (in those younger than 60 years), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (in nonblack patients), long-acting calcium channel blockers or angiotensin receptor antagonists. Other agents for first-line therapy for isolated systolic hypertension include long-acting dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers or angiotensin receptor antagonists. Certain comorbid conditions provide compelling indications for first-line use of other agents: in patients with angina, recent myocardial infarction or heart failure, beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors are recommended as first-line therapy; in patients with diabetes mellitus, ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor antagonists (or in patients without albuminuria, thiazides or dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers) are appropriate first-line therapies; and in patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, ACE inhibitors are recommended. All hypertensive patients should have their fasting lipids screened, and those with dyslipidemia should be treated using the thresholds, targets and agents recommended by the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Working Group on the management of dyslipidemia and the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Selected patients with hypertension, but without dyslipidemia, should also receive statin therapy and/or acetylsalicylic acid therapy.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the 45 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported here achieved at least 95% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2000 Jan 20;342(3):145-5310639539
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Jan 21;367(9506):209; author reply 21016427487
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2000 Sep;16(9):1094-10211021953
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2001 May;17(5):543-5911381277
Cites: Am J Med. 2001 Nov;111(7):553-811705432
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Feb 7;346(6):393-40311832527
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2002 Jun;18(6):625-4112107420
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Apr 5;361(9364):1149-5812686036
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Apr 23-30;289(16):2083-9312709466
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2003 May 12;163(9):1069-7512742805
Cites: JAMA. 2003 May 21;289(19):2534-4412759325
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2003 Jun 1;91(11):1316-2212767423
Cites: J Hypertens. 2003 Jun;21(6):1055-7612777939
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2003 Jul;14(7 Suppl 2):S99-S10212819311
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Sep 6;362(9386):767-7113678869
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Sep 6;362(9386):782-813678872
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2003 Nov 13;349(20):1893-90614610160
Cites: Congest Heart Fail. 2003 Nov-Dec;9(6):324-3214688505
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):41-5414968142
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):55-914968143
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2004 Feb;93(2-3):105-1114975535
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2004 May 24;164(10):1084-9115159265
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Jun 19;363(9426):2022-3115207952
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 1997 Oct;10(10 Pt 1):1097-1029370379
Cites: Lancet. 1998 Oct 24;352(9137):1347-519802273
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Nov 11;351(20):2058-6815531767
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 2004 Dec;82(12):935-915654408
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Mar 12-18;365(9463):939-4615766995
Cites: Stroke. 2005 Jun;36(6):1218-2615879332
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2005 Jun 27;165(12):1401-915983290
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):657-7216003449
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Sep 10-16;366(9489):895-90616154016
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Oct 29-Nov 4;366(9496):1545-5316257341
Cites: Pharmacotherapy. 2000 Apr;20(4):410-610772372
PubMed ID
16755313 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2007 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: part 2 - therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163300
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):539-50
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
May-15-2007
Author
Nadia A Khan
Brenda Hemmelgarn
Raj Padwal
Pierre Larochelle
Jeff L Mahon
Richard Z Lewanczuk
Finlay A McAlister
Simon W Rabkin
Michael D Hill
Ross D Feldman
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Norman R C Campbell
Alexander G Logan
Malcolm Arnold
Gordon Moe
Tavis S Campbell
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Charlotte Jones
Lawrence A Leiter
Richard I Ogilvie
Robert J Herman
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
George Carruthers
Bruce Culleton
Kevin D Burns
Marcel Ruzicka
Jacques deChamplain
George Pylypchuk
Norm Gledhill
Robert Petrella
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Luc Trudeau
Robert A Hegele
Vincent Woo
Phil McFarlane
Rhian M Touyz
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia. nakhan@shaw.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):539-50
Date
May-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Diet, Sodium-Restricted
Health promotion
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - prevention & control - therapy
Patient Education as Topic
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk Reduction Behavior
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the prevention and management of hypertension in adults.
For lifestyle and pharmacological interventions, evidence was reviewed from randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews of trials. Changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were the primary outcomes of interest. However, for lifestyle interventions, blood pressure lowering was accepted as a primary outcome given the lack of long-term morbidity and mortality data in this field. For treatment of patients with kidney disease, the progression of kidney dysfunction was also accepted as a clinically relevant primary outcome.
A Cochrane collaboration librarian conducted an independent MEDLINE search from 2005 to August 2006 to update the 2006 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations. In addition, reference lists were scanned and experts were contacted to identify additional published studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently by both content and methodological experts using prespecified levels of evidence.
Dietary lifestyle modifications for prevention of hypertension, in addition to a well-balanced diet, include a dietary sodium intake of less than 100 mmol/day. In hypertensive patients, the dietary sodium intake should be limited to 65 mmol/day to 100 mmol/day. Other lifestyle modifications for both normotensive and hypertensive patients include: performing 30 min to 60 min of aerobic exercise four to seven days per week; maintaining a healthy body weight (body mass index of 18.5 kg/m2 to 24.9 kg/m2) and waist circumference (less than 102 cm in men and less than 88 cm in women); limiting alcohol consumption to no more than 14 units per week in men or nine units per week in women; following a diet reduced in saturated fat and cholesterol, and one that emphasizes fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products, dietary and soluble fibre, whole grains and protein from plant sources; and considering stress management in selected individuals with hypertension. For the pharmacological management of hypertension, treatment thresholds and targets should take into account each individual's global atherosclerotic risk, target organ damage and any comorbid conditions: blood pressure should be lowered to lower than 140/90 mmHg in all patients and lower than 130/80 mmHg in those with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease. Most patients require more than one agent to achieve these blood pressure targets. In adults without compelling indications for other agents, initial therapy should include thiazide diuretics; other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for diastolic and/or systolic hypertension include angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (except in black patients), long-acting calcium channel blockers (CCBs), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) or beta-blockers (in those younger than 60 years of age). First-line therapy for isolated systolic hypertension includes long-acting dihydropyridine CCBs or ARBs. Certain comorbid conditions provide compelling indications for first-line use of other agents: in patients with angina, recent myocardial infarction, or heart failure, beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors are recommended as first-line therapy; in patients with cerebrovascular disease, an ACE inhibitor plus diuretic combination is preferred; in patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, ACE inhibitors are recommended; and in patients with diabetes mellitus, ACE inhibitors or ARBs (or, in patients without albuminuria, thiazides or dihydropyridine CCBs) are appropriate first-line therapies. All hypertensive patients with dyslipidemia should be treated using the thresholds, targets and agents outlined in the Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement (recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of dyslipidemia and prevention of cardiovascular disease). Selected high-risk patients with hypertension who do not achieve thresholds for statin therapy according to the position paper should nonetheless receive statin therapy. Once blood pressure is controlled, acetylsalicylic acid therapy should be considered.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the 57 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported here achieved at least 95% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2000 Mar 13;160(5):685-9310724055
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Apr 23-30;289(16):2083-9312709466
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2001 Jan 4;344(1):3-1011136953
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2001 May;17(5):543-5911381277
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2001 Jul 17;135(2):73-8711453706
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Sep 11-17;364(9438):937-5215364185
Cites: Kidney Int Suppl. 2004 Nov;(92):S90-615485427
Cites: Hypertension. 2004 Nov;44(5):637-4215381674
Cites: Lancet. 1990 Mar 31;335(8692):765-741969518
Cites: Hypertension. 1991 Jan;17(1 Suppl):I16-201986996
Cites: JAMA. 2003 May 21;289(19):2534-4412759325
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2003 Jun 1;91(11):1316-2212767423
Cites: J Hypertens. 2003 Jun;21(6):1055-7612777939
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2003 Jul;14(7 Suppl 2):S99-S10212819311
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):41-5414968142
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):55-914968143
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2004 May 24;164(10):1084-9115159265
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Jun 19;363(9426):2022-3115207952
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2004;(3):CD00493715266549
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1993 Jul;16(7):996-10038359108
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1996 Jan;19(1):79-898720542
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1999 Feb;22(2):307-1310333950
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2005 Jul 5;143(1):1-915998749
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):657-7216003449
Cites: J Hypertens. 2005 Dec;23(12):2157-7216269957
Cites: JAMA. 2005 Nov 16;294(19):2455-6416287956
Cites: J Hum Hypertens. 2005 Dec;19 Suppl 3:S10-916302005
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2006 Jan 3;47(1):65-7116386666
Cites: Hypertension. 2006 Feb;47(2):296-30816434724
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Feb;83(2):221-616469978
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):583-9316755313
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jun;83(6):1289-9616762939
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2006 Jun 20;144(12):884-9316785477
Cites: Am J Med. 2001 Nov;111(7):553-811705432
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Feb 7;346(6):393-40311832527
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Mar 23;359(9311):1004-1011937179
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2002 Jun;18(6):625-4112107420
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Jan 11;361(9352):117-2412531578
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Mar 1;361(9359):717-2512620735
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Apr 5;361(9364):1149-5812686036
Comment In: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):603-417593584
PubMed ID
17534460 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2009 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part 2--therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151164
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):287-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Nadia A Khan
Brenda Hemmelgarn
Robert J Herman
Chaim M Bell
Jeff L Mahon
Lawrence A Leiter
Simon W Rabkin
Michael D Hill
Raj Padwal
Rhian M Touyz
Pierre Larochelle
Ross D Feldman
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Norman R C Campbell
Gordon Moe
Ramesh Prasad
Malcolm O Arnold
Tavis S Campbell
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Charlotte Jones
Richard I Ogilvie
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
George Carruthers
Kevin D Burns
Marcel Ruzicka
Jacques DeChamplain
George Pylypchuk
Robert Petrella
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Luc Trudeau
Robert A Hegele
Vincent Woo
Phil McFarlane
Michel Vallée
Jonathan Howlett
Simon L Bacon
Patrice Lindsay
Richard E Gilbert
Richard Z Lewanczuk
Sheldon Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. nakhan@shaw.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):287-98
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Canada
Case Management - standards
Combined Modality Therapy
Diet, Sodium-Restricted
Female
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - therapy
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic
Prognosis
Program Evaluation
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To update the evidence-based recommendations for the prevention and management of hypertension in adults for 2009.
For lifestyle and pharmacological interventions, evidence from randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews of trials was preferentially reviewed. Changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were the primary outcomes of interest. However, for lifestyle interventions, blood pressure lowering was accepted as a primary outcome given the lack of long-term morbidity and mortality data in this field. Progression of kidney dysfunction was also accepted as a clinically relevant primary outcome among patients with chronic kidney disease.
A Cochrane collaboration librarian conducted an independent MEDLINE search from 2007 to August 2008 to update the 2008 recommendations. To identify additional published studies, reference lists were reviewed and experts were contacted. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently by both content and methodological experts using prespecified levels of evidence.
For lifestyle modifications to prevent and treat hypertension, restrict dietary sodium to less than 2300 mg (100 mmol)/day (and 1500 mg to 2300 mg [65 mmol to 100 mmol]/day in hypertensive patients); perform 30 min to 60 min of aerobic exercise four to seven days per week; maintain a healthy body weight (body mass index 18.5 kg/m(2) to 24.9 kg/m(2)) and waist circumference (smaller than 102 cm for men and smaller than 88 cm for women); limit alcohol consumption to no more than 14 units per week in men or nine units per week in women; follow a diet that is reduced in saturated fat and cholesterol, and that emphasizes fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products, dietary and soluble fibre, whole grains and protein from plant sources; and consider stress management in selected individuals with hypertension. For the pharmacological management of hypertension, treatment thresholds and targets should be predicated on by the patient's global atherosclerotic risk, target organ damage and comorbid conditions. Blood pressure should be decreased to lower than 140/90 mmHg in all patients, and to lower than 130/80 mmHg in those with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease. Most patients will require more than one agent to achieve these target blood pressures. Antihypertensive therapy should be considered in all adult patients regardless of age (caution should be exercised in elderly patients who are frail). For adults without compelling indications for other agents, initial therapy should include thiazide diuretics. Other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for diastolic and/or systolic hypertension include angiotensin- converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (in patients who are not black), long-acting calcium channel blockers (CCBs), angiotensin receptor antagonists (ARBs) or beta-blockers (in those younger than 60 years of age). A combination of two first-line agents may also be considered as the initial treatment of hypertension if the systolic blood pressure is 20 mmHg above the target or if the diastolic blood pressure is 10 mmHg above the target. The combination of ACE inhibitors and ARBs should not be used. Other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for isolated systolic hypertension include long- acting dihydropyridine CCBs or ARBs. In patients with angina, recent myocardial infarction or heart failure, beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors are recommended as first-line therapy; in patients with cerebrovascular disease, an ACE inhibitor/diuretic combination is preferred; in patients with proteinuric nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, ACE inhibitors or ARBs (if intolerant to ACE inhibitors) are recommended; and in patients with diabetes mellitus, ACE inhibitors or ARBs (or, in patients without albuminuria, thiazides or dihydropyridine CCBs) are appropriate first-line therapies. All hypertensive patients with dyslipidemia should be treated using the thresholds, targets and agents outlined in the Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement (recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of dyslipidemia and prevention of cardiovascular disease). Selected high-risk patients with hypertension who do not achieve thresholds for statin therapy according to the position paper should nonetheless receive statin therapy. Once blood pressure is controlled, acetylsalicylic acid therapy should be considered.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the 57 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported here achieved at least 95% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
Cites: Circulation. 2000 Jun 6;101(22):2612-710840013
Cites: Lancet. 1999 Nov 20;354(9192):1751-610577635
Cites: JAMA. 2001 Jan 24-31;285(4):437-4311242428
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2001 May;17(5):543-5911381277
Cites: Lancet. 2001 Sep 29;358(9287):1033-4111589932
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2001 Dec 6;345(23):1667-7511759645
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2002 Jun;18(6):625-4112107420
Cites: Am J Med. 2002 Oct 1;113(5):359-6412401529
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Apr 5;361(9364):1149-5812686036
Cites: JAMA. 2003 May 21;289(19):2534-4412759325
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2003 Jun 18;41(12):2197-20412821247
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Sep 6;362(9386):767-7113678869
Cites: BMJ. 2004 Feb 7;328(7435):32614744823
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):41-5414968142
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):55-914968143
Cites: CMAJ. 1992 Jun 1;146(11):1997-20051596849
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 1998 Oct 16;82(8A):2N-9N9809895
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 1998 Nov;32(5 Suppl 3):S112-99820470
Cites: Lancet. 1999 Feb 20;353(9153):611-610030325
Cites: Lancet. 1999 Mar 6;353(9155):793-610459960
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2004 Nov 16;141(10):781-815545678
Cites: BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2005;5(1):415691376
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2005 Mar 1;45(5):712-915734615
Cites: Stroke. 2005 Jun;36(6):1218-2615879332
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):657-7216003449
Cites: J Hypertens. 2005 Dec;23(12):2157-7216269957
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Dec;21(14):1265-7116341294
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2006 Mar;17(3 Suppl 1):S1-2716497879
Cites: J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown). 2006 Jan;7(1):29-3816645357
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):559-6416755310
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):583-9316755313
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2007 Mar;55(3):383-817341240
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Sep 8;370(9590):829-4017765963
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2008 Jan 1;148(1):30-4817984482
Cites: Am J Ther. 2008 Jan-Feb;15(1):36-4318223352
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2008 Feb;21(2):148-5218174885
Cites: J Hypertens. 2008 Mar;26(3):403-1118300848
Cites: J Hypertens. 2008 Apr;26(4):672-718327075
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Apr 10;358(15):1547-5918378520
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 May 1;358(18):1887-9818378519
Cites: Lancet. 2008 May 10;371(9624):1575-618468534
Cites: Hypertension. 2008 Jun;51(6):1552-618391094
Cites: J Intern Med. 2008 Aug;264(2):187-9418393959
Cites: Lancet. 2008 Aug 16;372(9638):547-5318707986
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Sep 18;359(12):1225-3718753639
Cites: Lancet. 2008 Sep 27;372(9644):1174-8318757085
Cites: Lancet. 2000 Dec 9;356(9246):1955-6411130523
PubMed ID
19417859 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2010 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: part 2 - therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143444
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 May;26(5):249-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Daniel G Hackam
Nadia A Khan
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Simon W Rabkin
Rhian M Touyz
Norman R C Campbell
Raj Padwal
Tavis S Campbell
M Patrice Lindsay
Michael D Hill
Robert R Quinn
Jeff L Mahon
Robert J Herman
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Marcel Ruzicka
Pierre Larochelle
Ross D Feldman
Marcel Lebel
Luc Poirier
J Malcolm O Arnold
Gordon W Moe
Jonathan G Howlett
Luc Trudeau
Simon L Bacon
Robert J Petrella
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Denis Drouin
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Mukul Sharma
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
George K Dresser
S George Carruthers
George Pylypchuk
Ellen D Burgess
Kevin D Burns
Michel Vallée
G V Ramesh Prasad
Richard E Gilbert
Lawrence A Leiter
Charlotte Jones
Richard I Ogilvie
Vincent Woo
Philip A McFarlane
Robert A Hegele
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Clinical Neurological Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario. dhackam@uwo.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 May;26(5):249-58
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Combined Modality Therapy
Diet, Sodium-Restricted
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Primary Prevention - standards
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Abstract
To update the evidence-based recommendations for the prevention and treatment of hypertension in adults for 2010.
For lifestyle and pharmacological interventions, randomized trials and systematic reviews of trials were preferentially reviewed. Changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were the primary outcomes of interest. However, for lifestyle interventions, blood pressure lowering was accepted as a primary outcome given the general lack of long-term morbidity and mortality data in this field. Progressive renal impairment was also accepted as a clinically relevant primary outcome among patients with chronic kidney disease.
A Cochrane Collaboration librarian conducted an independent MEDLINE search from 2008 to August 2009 to update the 2009 recommendations. To identify additional studies, reference lists were reviewed and experts were contacted. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently by both content and methodological experts using prespecified levels of evidence.
For lifestyle modifications to prevent and treat hypertension, restrict dietary sodium to 1500 mg (65 mmol) per day in adults 50 years of age or younger, to 1300 mg (57 mmol) per day in adults 51 to 70 years of age, and to 1200 mg (52 mmol) per day in adults older than 70 years of age; perform 30 min to 60 min of moderate aerobic exercise four to seven days per week; maintain a healthy body weight (body mass index 18.5 kg/m(2) to 24.9 kg/m(2)) and waist circumference (less than 102 cm for men and less than 88 cm for women); limit alcohol consumption to no more than 14 standard drinks per week for men or nine standard drinks per week for women; follow a diet that emphasizes fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products, dietary and soluble fibre, whole grains and protein from plant sources, and that is low in saturated fat and cholesterol; and consider stress management in selected individuals with hypertension. For the pharmacological management of hypertension, treatment thresholds and targets should be predicated on the patient's global atherosclerotic risk, target organ damage and comorbid conditions. Blood pressure should be decreased to less than 140/90 mmHg in all patients, and to less than 130/80 mmHg in patients with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease. Most patients will require more than one agent to achieve these target blood pressures. Antihypertensive therapy should be considered in all adult patients regardless of age (caution should be exercised in elderly patients who are frail). For adults without compelling indications for other agents, considerations for initial therapy should include thiazide diuretics, angiotensin- converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (in patients who are not black), long-acting calcium channel blockers (CCBs), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) or beta-blockers (in those younger than 60 years of age). A combination of two first-line agents may also be considered as initial treatment of hypertension if systolic blood pressure is 20 mmHg above target or if diastolic blood pressure is 10 mmHg above target. The combination of ACE inhibitors and ARBs should not be used, unless compelling indications are present to suggest consideration of dual therapy. Agents appropriate for first-line therapy for isolated systolic hypertension include thiazide diuretics, long-acting dihydropyridine CCBs or ARBs. In patients with coronary artery disease, ACE inhibitors, ARBs or betablockers are recommended as first-line therapy; in patients with cerebrovascular disease, an ACE inhibitor/diuretic combination is preferred; in patients with proteinuric nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, ACE inhibitors or ARBs (if intolerant to ACE inhibitors) are recommended; and in patients with diabetes mellitus, ACE inhibitors or ARBs (or, in patients without albuminuria, thiazides or dihydropyridine CCBs) are appropriate first-line therapies. In selected high-risk patients in whom combination therapy is being considered, an ACE inhibitor plus a long-acting dihydropyridine CCB is preferable to an ACE inhibitor plus a thiazide diuretic. All hypertensive patients with dyslipidemia should be treated using the thresholds, targets and agents outlined in the Canadian lipid treatment guidelines. Selected patients with hypertension who do not achieve thresholds for statin therapy, but who are otherwise at high risk for cardiovascular events, should nonetheless receive statin therapy. Once blood pressure is controlled, low-dose acetylsalicylic acid therapy should be considered.
All recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence and voted on by the 63 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported here achieved at least 80% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
The Canadian Hypertension Education Program process is sponsored by the Canadian Hypertension Society, Blood Pressure Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, the College of Family Physicians of Canada, the Canadian Pharmacists Association, the Canadian Council of Cardiovascular Nurses, and the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.
Notes
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2002 Jun;18(6):625-4112107420
Cites: BMJ. 2009;339:b456719934192
Cites: CMAJ. 1992 Jun 1;146(11):1997-20051596849
Cites: BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2005;5(1):415691376
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):559-6416755310
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Oct 21;368(9545):1449-5617055947
Cites: Blood Press. 2007;16(1):13-917453747
Cites: BMJ. 2007 Apr 28;334(7599):885-817449506
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 1;23(6):437-4317487286
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Apr 10;358(15):1547-5918378520
Cites: Lancet. 2008 May 3;371(9623):1513-818456100
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Sep 18;359(12):1225-3718753639
Cites: Lancet. 2008 Sep 27;372(9644):1174-8318757085
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Dec 4;359(23):2417-2819052124
Cites: Circulation. 2009 Feb 3;119(4):530-719153265
Cites: Am J Med. 2009 Mar;122(3):290-30019272490
Cites: Hypertension. 2009 Apr;53(4):646-5319237683
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2009 May;24(5):1663-7119145003
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):271-719417857
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):287-9819417859
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2009 Oct;25(10):567-7919812802
Cites: J Hypertens. 2009 Dec;27(12):2321-3119727007
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Apr 5;361(9364):1149-5812686036
PubMed ID
20485689 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2011 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: blood pressure measurement, diagnosis, assessment of risk, and therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132607
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Jul-Aug;27(4):415-433.e1-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
Doreen M Rabi
Stella S Daskalopoulou
Raj S Padwal
Nadia A Khan
Steven A Grover
Daniel G Hackam
Martin G Myers
Donald W McKay
Robert R Quinn
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Lyne Cloutier
Peter Bolli
Michael D Hill
Thomas Wilson
Brian Penner
Ellen Burgess
Maxime Lamarre-Cliché
Donna McLean
Ernesto L Schiffrin
George Honos
Karen Mann
Guy Tremblay
Alain Milot
Arun Chockalingam
Simon W Rabkin
Martin Dawes
Rhian M Touyz
Kevin D Burns
Marcel Ruzicka
Norman R C Campbell
Michel Vallée
G V Ramesh Prasad
Marcel Lebel
Tavis S Campbell
M Patrice Lindsay
Robert J Herman
Pierre Larochelle
Ross D Feldman
J Malcolm O Arnold
Gordon W Moe
Jonathan G Howlett
Luc Trudeau
Simon L Bacon
Robert J Petrella
Richard Lewanczuk
James A Stone
Denis Drouin
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Mukul Sharma
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
George K Dresser
S George Carruthers
George Pylypchuk
Richard E Gilbert
Lawrence A Leiter
Charlotte Jones
Richard I Ogilvie
Vincent Woo
Philip A McFarlane
Robert A Hegele
Luc Poirier
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. doreen.rabi@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Jul-Aug;27(4):415-433.e1-2
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination
Canada
Health education
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy
Risk assessment
Abstract
We updated the evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension in adults for 2011. The major guideline changes this year are: (1) a recommendation was made for using comparative risk analogies when communicating a patient's cardiovascular risk; (2) diagnostic testing issues for renal artery stenosis were discussed; (3) recommendations were added for the management of hypertension during the acute phase of stroke; (4) people with hypertension and diabetes are now considered high risk for cardiovascular events if they have elevated urinary albumin excretion, overt kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, or the presence of other cardiovascular risk factors; (5) the combination of an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor and a dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker (CCB) is preferred over the combination of an ACE inhibitor and a thiazide diuretic in persons with diabetes and hypertension; and (6) a recommendation was made to coordinate with pharmacists to improve antihypertensive medication adherence. We also discussed the recent analyses that examined the association between angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) and cancer.
PubMed ID
21801975 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2012 Canadian hypertension education program recommendations for the management of hypertension: blood pressure measurement, diagnosis, assessment of risk, and therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124290
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2012 May;28(3):270-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Stella S Daskalopoulou
Nadia A Khan
Robert R Quinn
Marcel Ruzicka
Donald W McKay
Daniel G Hackam
Simon W Rabkin
Doreen M Rabi
Richard E Gilbert
Raj S Padwal
Martin Dawes
Rhian M Touyz
Tavis S Campbell
Lyne Cloutier
Steven Grover
George Honos
Robert J Herman
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Peter Bolli
Thomas Wilson
Ross D Feldman
M Patrice Lindsay
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Michael D Hill
Mark Gelfer
Kevin D Burns
Michel Vallée
G V Ramesh Prasad
Marcel Lebel
Donna McLean
J Malcolm O Arnold
Gordon W Moe
Jonathan G Howlett
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Pierre Larochelle
Lawrence A Leiter
Charlotte Jones
Richard I Ogilvie
Vincent Woo
Janusz Kaczorowski
Luc Trudeau
Simon L Bacon
Robert J Petrella
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Denis Drouin
Maxime Lamarre-Cliché
Marshall Godwin
Guy Tremblay
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
S George Carruthers
George Pylypchuk
Ellen Burgess
Richard Lewanczuk
George K Dresser
Brian Penner
Robert A Hegele
Philip A McFarlane
Mukul Sharma
Norman R C Campbell
Debra Reid
Luc Poirier
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, Canada. stella.daskalopoulou@mcgill.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2012 May;28(3):270-87
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination - methods
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Education, Medical, Continuing - standards
Evidence-Based Medicine - standards
Female
Health Education - standards
Humans
Hypertension - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Physiologic - methods
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We updated the evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension in adults for 2012. The new recommendations are: (1) use of home blood pressure monitoring to confirm a diagnosis of white coat syndrome; (2) mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists may be used in selected patients with hypertension and systolic heart failure; (3) a history of atrial fibrillation in patients with hypertension should not be a factor in deciding to prescribe an angiotensin-receptor blocker for the treatment of hypertension; and (4) the blood pressure target for patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease has now been changed to
PubMed ID
22595447 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2013 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for blood pressure measurement, diagnosis, assessment of risk, prevention, and treatment of hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115112
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 May;29(5):528-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Daniel G Hackam
Robert R Quinn
Pietro Ravani
Doreen M Rabi
Kaberi Dasgupta
Stella S Daskalopoulou
Nadia A Khan
Robert J Herman
Simon L Bacon
Lyne Cloutier
Martin Dawes
Simon W Rabkin
Richard E Gilbert
Marcel Ruzicka
Donald W McKay
Tavis S Campbell
Steven Grover
George Honos
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Peter Bolli
Thomas W Wilson
Ross D Feldman
Patrice Lindsay
Michael D Hill
Mark Gelfer
Kevin D Burns
Michel Vallée
G V Ramesh Prasad
Marcel Lebel
Donna McLean
J Malcolm O Arnold
Gordon W Moe
Jonathan G Howlett
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Pierre Larochelle
Lawrence A Leiter
Charlotte Jones
Richard I Ogilvie
Vincent Woo
Janusz Kaczorowski
Luc Trudeau
Robert J Petrella
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Denis Drouin
Kim L Lavoie
Maxime Lamarre-Cliche
Marshall Godwin
Guy Tremblay
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
S George Carruthers
George B Pylypchuk
Ellen Burgess
Richard Lewanczuk
George K Dresser
S Brian Penner
Robert A Hegele
Philip A McFarlane
Mukul Sharma
Debra J Reid
Sheldon W Tobe
Luc Poirier
Raj S Padwal
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Medicine, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. dhackam@uwo.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 May;29(5):528-42
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - physiology
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Pressure Determination
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Exercise - physiology
Health education
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy
Risk assessment
Abstract
We updated the evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension in adults for 2013. This year's update includes 2 new recommendations. First, among nonhypertensive or stage 1 hypertensive individuals, the use of resistance or weight training exercise does not adversely influence blood pressure (BP) (Grade D). Thus, such patients need not avoid this type of exercise for fear of increasing BP. Second, and separately, for very elderly patients with isolated systolic hypertension (age 80 years or older), the target for systolic BP should be
PubMed ID
23541660 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2014 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for blood pressure measurement, diagnosis, assessment of risk, prevention, and treatment of hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104360
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2014 May;30(5):485-501
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Kaberi Dasgupta
Robert R Quinn
Kelly B Zarnke
Doreen M Rabi
Pietro Ravani
Stella S Daskalopoulou
Simon W Rabkin
Luc Trudeau
Ross D Feldman
Lyne Cloutier
Ally Prebtani
Robert J Herman
Simon L Bacon
Richard E Gilbert
Marcel Ruzicka
Donald W McKay
Tavis S Campbell
Steven Grover
George Honos
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Peter Bolli
Thomas W Wilson
Patrice Lindsay
Michael D Hill
Shelagh B Coutts
Gord Gubitz
Mark Gelfer
Michel Vallée
G V Ramesh Prasad
Marcel Lebel
Donna McLean
J Malcolm O Arnold
Gordon W Moe
Jonathan G Howlett
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Pierre Larochelle
Lawrence A Leiter
Charlotte Jones
Richard I Ogilvie
Vincent Woo
Janusz Kaczorowski
Kevin D Burns
Robert J Petrella
Swapnil Hiremath
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Denis Drouin
Kim L Lavoie
Maxime Lamarre-Cliche
Guy Tremblay
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
S George Carruthers
George B Pylypchuk
Ellen Burgess
Richard Lewanczuk
George K Dresser
S Brian Penner
Robert A Hegele
Philip A McFarlane
Milan Khara
Andrew Pipe
Paul Oh
Peter Selby
Mukul Sharma
Debra J Reid
Sheldon W Tobe
Raj S Padwal
Luc Poirier
Author Affiliation
Divisions of General Internal Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology and Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, McGill University, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Québec, Canada. Electronic address: kaberi.dasgupta@mcgill.ca.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2014 May;30(5):485-501
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Canada
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - prevention & control
Life Style
Patient Education as Topic
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prognosis
Program Evaluation
Abstract
Herein, updated evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension in Canadian adults are detailed. For 2014, 3 existing recommendations were modified and 2 new recommendations were added. The following recommendations were modified: (1) the recommended sodium intake threshold was changed from = 1500 mg (3.75 g of salt) to approximately 2000 mg (5 g of salt) per day; (2) a pharmacotherapy treatment initiation systolic blood pressure threshold of = 160 mm Hg was added in very elderly (age = 80 years) patients who do not have diabetes or target organ damage (systolic blood pressure target in this population remains at
PubMed ID
24786438 View in PubMed
Less detail

Early socioeconomic status is associated with adult nighttime blood pressure dipping.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158941
Source
Psychosom Med. 2008 Apr;70(3):276-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Tavis S Campbell
Brenda L Key
Alana D Ireland
Simon L Bacon
Blaine Ditto
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 1N4. t.s.campbell@ucalgary.ca
Source
Psychosom Med. 2008 Apr;70(3):276-81
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta
Arousal - physiology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology - psychology
Child
Child Rearing
Circadian Rhythm - physiology
Female
Health Behavior
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Psychophysiology
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications - physiopathology
Abstract
To examine the prognostic significance of early socioeconomic status (SES) on 24-hour blood pressure (BP) during early adulthood. Low SES has been related to poor health outcomes, in particular, cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent cross-sectional research has also linked low levels of SES with several cardiovascular risk factors including poor nighttime BP dipping.
A total of 174 undergraduate university students whose childhood SES was assessed by highest level of education completed by their parents underwent 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring.
Initial correlation analyses revealed positive associations between childhood SES and BP dipping, indicating that lower levels of childhood SES were associated with less systolic BP (SBP) (r = .29, p
PubMed ID
18256336 View in PubMed
Less detail

The eCALM Trial-eTherapy for cancer appLying mindfulness: online mindfulness-based cancer recovery program for underserved individuals living with cancer in Alberta: protocol development for a randomized wait-list controlled clinical trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116291
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2013;13:34
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Kristin A Zernicke
Tavis S Campbell
Michael Speca
Kelley McCabe-Ruff
Steven Flowers
Dale A Dirkse
Linda E Carlson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2013;13:34
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Chronic Disease
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Internet
Male
Meditation - methods
Neoplasms - complications - psychology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pain Management
Research Subjects
Stress, Psychological - therapy
Waiting Lists
Yoga
Abstract
Elevated stress can exacerbate cancer symptom severity, and after completion of primary cancer treatments, many individuals continue to have significant distress. Mindfulness-Based Cancer Recovery (MBCR) is an 8-week group psychosocial intervention consisting of training in mindfulness meditation and yoga designed to mitigate stress, pain, and chronic illness. Efficacy research shows face-to-face (F2F) MBCR programs have positive benefits for cancer patients; however barriers exist that impede participation in F2F groups. While online MBCR groups are available to the public, none have been evaluated.
determine whether underserved patients are willing to participate in and complete an online MBCR program.
determine whether online MBCR will mirror previous efficacy findings from F2F MBCR groups on patient-reported outcomes.
The study includes cancer patients in Alberta, exhibiting moderate distress, who do not have access to F2F MBCR. Participants will be randomized to either online MBCR, or waiting for the next available group. An anticipated sample size of 64 participants will complete measures online pre and post treatment or waiting period. Feasibility will be tracked through monitoring numbers eligible and participating through each stage of the protocol.
47 have completed/completing the intervention. Data suggest it is possible to conduct a randomized waitlist controlled trial of online MBCR to reach underserved cancer survivors.
Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT01476891.
Notes
Cites: Psychosom Med. 2000 Sep-Oct;62(5):613-2211020090
Cites: Psychooncology. 2001 Jan-Feb;10(1):19-2811180574
Cites: Support Care Cancer. 2001 Mar;9(2):112-2311305069
Cites: Ann Behav Med. 2002 Winter;24(1):49-5812008794
Cites: Support Care Cancer. 2002 May;10(4):329-3612029433
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 2003 Jan;54(1):85-9112505559
Cites: J Pers Soc Psychol. 2003 Apr;84(4):822-4812703651
Cites: Psychosom Med. 2003 Jul-Aug;65(4):571-8112883107
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 2003 Nov;55(5):403-914581094
Cites: Annu Rev Psychol. 2004;55:573-9014744227
Cites: Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2004 May;29(4):448-7414749092
Cites: Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2004 May;38(5):320-615144508
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2004 Jun 14;90(12):2297-30415162149
Cites: J Trauma Stress. 1996 Jul;9(3):455-718827649
Cites: Cancer. 2005 Apr 1;103(7):1494-50215726544
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 2005 Apr;73(2):360-415796646
Cites: Ann Behav Med. 2005 Aug;30(1):54-6416097906
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2005 Nov;52(3):315-2716194185
Cites: Int J Behav Med. 2005;12(4):278-8516262547
Cites: Assessment. 2006 Mar;13(1):27-4516443717
Cites: Psychooncology. 2006 Feb;15(2):93-516444764
Cites: Integr Cancer Ther. 2006 Jun;5(2):98-10816685074
Cites: Psychooncology. 2006 Aug;15(8):684-9316302291
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2006 Apr;52:474-517327889
Cites: Psychooncology. 2007 Jun;16(6):534-4216989004
Cites: Support Care Cancer. 2007 Aug;15(8):949-6117611782
Cites: Oncol Nurs Forum. 2007 Sep;34(5):1059-6617878133
Cites: Brain Behav Immun. 2007 Nov;21(8):1038-4917521871
Cites: Int J Behav Med. 2007;14(4):249-5618001241
Cites: J Telemed Telecare. 2008;14(2):88-9218348755
Cites: Psychooncology. 2009 Jun;18(6):571-919023879
Cites: Psychooncology. 2009 Dec;18(12):1261-7219235193
PubMed ID
23414206 View in PubMed
Less detail

13 records – page 1 of 2.