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Out of place: mediating health and social care in Ontario's long-term care sector.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165872
Source
Can J Aging. 2007;26 Suppl 1:63-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Tamara Daly
Author Affiliation
School of Health Policy and Management, Faculty of Health, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada. dalyt@yorku.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2007;26 Suppl 1:63-75
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Commerce
Community Networks - legislation & jurisprudence
Financing, Government
Health Services Accessibility - economics
Home Care Services - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Long-Term Care - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Negotiating
Ontario
Social Support
Abstract
The paper discusses two reforms in Ontario's long-term care. The first is the commercialization of home care as a result of the implementation of a "managed competition" delivery model. The second is the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care's privileging of "health care" over "social care" through changes to which types of home care and home support services receive public funding. It addresses the effects of these reforms on the state–non-profit relationship, and the shifting balance between public funding of health and social care. At a program level, and with few exceptions, homemaking services have been cut from home care, and home support services are more medicalized. With these changes, growing numbers of people no longer eligible to receive publicly funded home care services look for other alternatives: they draw available resources from home support, they draw on family and friend networks, they hire privately and pay out of pocket, they leave home and enter an institution, or they do without.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21598747 View in PubMed
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Structural violence in long-term, residential care for older people: comparing Canada and Scandinavia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128456
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2012 Feb;74(3):390-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Albert Banerjee
Tamara Daly
Pat Armstrong
Marta Szebehely
Hugh Armstrong
Stirling Lafrance
Author Affiliation
Re-imagining Long-term Residential Care, York University, 4700 Keele St, Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3, Canada. balbertb@yorku.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2012 Feb;74(3):390-8
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Caregivers - statistics & numerical data
Female
Focus Groups
Homes for the Aged - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Long-Term Care
Male
Professional-Patient Relations
Risk assessment
Scandinavia
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Workplace - standards
Abstract
Canadian frontline careworkers are six times more likely to experience daily physical violence than their Scandinavian counterparts. This paper draws on a comparative survey of residential careworkers serving older people across three Canadian provinces (Manitoba, Nova Scotia, Ontario) and four countries that follow a Scandinavian model of social care (Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden) conducted between 2005 and 2006. Ninety percent of Canadian frontline careworkers experienced physical violence from residents or their relatives and 43 percent reported physical violence on a daily basis. Canadian focus groups conducted in 2007 reveal violence was often normalized as an inevitable part of elder-care. We use the concept of "structural violence" (Galtung, 1969) to raise questions about the role that systemic and organizational factors play in setting the context for violence. Structural violence refers to indirect forms of violence that are built into social structures and that prevent people from meeting their basic needs or fulfilling their potential. We applied the concept to long-term residential care and found that the poor quality of the working conditions and inadequate levels of support experienced by Canadian careworkers constitute a form of structural violence. Working conditions are detrimental to careworker's physical and mental health, and prevent careworkers from providing the quality of care they are capable of providing and understand to be part of their job. These conditions may also contribute to the physical violence workers experience, and further investigation is warranted.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22204839 View in PubMed
Less detail