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Abdominal obesity is essential for the risk of venous thromboembolism in the metabolic syndrome: the Tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154041
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2009 May;7(5):739-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
K H Borch
S K Braekkan
E B Mathiesen
I. Njølstad
T. Wilsgaard
J. Størmer
J-B Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Center for Atherothrombotic Research in Tromsø, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø Norway. knut.borch@fagmed.uit.no
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2009 May;7(5):739-45
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Humans
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications
Venous Thromboembolism - complications
Abstract
The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors, including abdominal obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and all cause mortality.
The purpose of the study was to assess the impact of the metabolic syndrome, and its individual components, on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in a prospective population-based study.
Individual components of the metabolic syndrome were registered in 6170 subjects aged 25-84 years in the Tromsø Study in 1994-1995, and first ever VTE events were registered until 1 September 2007.
The metabolic syndrome was present in 21.9% (1350 subjects) of the population. There were 194 validated first VTE events (2.92 per 1000 person-years) during a mean of 10.8 years of follow-up. Presence of metabolic syndrome was associated with increased risk of VTE (HR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.22-2.23) in age- and gender-adjusted analysis. The risk of VTE increased with the number of components in the metabolic syndrome (P
Notes
Comment In: J Thromb Haemost. 2009 May;7(5):736-819245417
PubMed ID
19036065 View in PubMed
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Atrial fibrillation is associated with cognitive decline in stroke-free subjects: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285614
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2017 Sep 13;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-13-2017
Author
S. Tiwari
M L Løchen
B K Jacobsen
L A Hopstock
A. Nyrnes
I. Njølstad
E B Mathiesen
K A Arntzen
J. Ball
S. Stewart
T. Wilsgaard
H. Schirmer
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2017 Sep 13;
Date
Sep-13-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Previous studies have shown associations between atrial fibrillation (AF) and cognitive decline. We investigated this association in a prospective population study, focusing on whether stroke risk factors modulated this association in stroke-free women and men.
We included 4983 participants (57% women) from the fifth survey of the Tromsø Study (Tromsø 5, 2001), of whom 2491 also participated in the sixth survey (Tromsø 6, 2007-2008). Information about age, education, blood pressure, body mass index, lipids, smoking, coffee consumption, physical activity, depression, coronary and valvular heart disease, heart failure and diabetes was obtained at baseline. AF status was based on hospital records. The outcome was change in cognitive score from Tromsø 5 to Tromsø 6, measured by the verbal memory test, the digit-symbol coding test and the tapping test.
Mean age at baseline was 65.4 years. The mean reduction in the tapping test scores was significantly larger in participants with AF (5.3 taps/10 s; 95% CI: 3.9, 6.7) compared with those without AF (3.8 taps/10 s; 95% CI: 3.5, 4.1). These estimates were unchanged when adjusted for other risk factors and were similar for both sexes. AF was not associated with change in the digit-symbol coding or the verbal memory tests.
Atrial fibrillation in stroke-free participants was independently associated with cognitive decline as measured with the tapping test.
PubMed ID
28901674 View in PubMed
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Atrial fibrillation is associated with cognitive decline in stroke-free subjects: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292234
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2017 12; 24(12):1485-1492
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-2017
Author
S Tiwari
M L Løchen
B K Jacobsen
L A Hopstock
A Nyrnes
I Njølstad
E B Mathiesen
K A Arntzen
J Ball
S Stewart
T Wilsgaard
H Schirmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø.
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2017 12; 24(12):1485-1492
Date
12-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Atrial Fibrillation - complications - psychology
Cognitive Dysfunction - complications - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Memory - physiology
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Prospective Studies
Psychomotor Performance - physiology
Risk factors
Abstract
Previous studies have shown associations between atrial fibrillation (AF) and cognitive decline. We investigated this association in a prospective population study, focusing on whether stroke risk factors modulated this association in stroke-free women and men.
We included 4983 participants (57% women) from the fifth survey of the Tromsø Study (Tromsø 5, 2001), of whom 2491 also participated in the sixth survey (Tromsø 6, 2007-2008). Information about age, education, blood pressure, body mass index, lipids, smoking, coffee consumption, physical activity, depression, coronary and valvular heart disease, heart failure and diabetes was obtained at baseline. AF status was based on hospital records. The outcome was change in cognitive score from Tromsø 5 to Tromsø 6, measured by the verbal memory test, the digit-symbol coding test and the tapping test.
Mean age at baseline was 65.4 years. The mean reduction in the tapping test scores was significantly larger in participants with AF (5.3 taps/10 s; 95% CI: 3.9, 6.7) compared with those without AF (3.8 taps/10 s; 95% CI: 3.5, 4.1). These estimates were unchanged when adjusted for other risk factors and were similar for both sexes. AF was not associated with change in the digit-symbol coding or the verbal memory tests.
Atrial fibrillation in stroke-free participants was independently associated with cognitive decline as measured with the tapping test.
PubMed ID
28901674 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure and body mass index in long-term survivors of testicular cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16856
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2005 Aug 1;23(22):4980-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2005
Author
H. Sagstuen
N. Aass
S D Fosså
O. Dahl
O. Klepp
E A Wist
T. Wilsgaard
R M Bremnes
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. hegesa@fagmed.uit.no
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2005 Aug 1;23(22):4980-90
Date
Aug-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Blood pressure
Body Composition
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - etiology
Odds Ratio
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survivors
Testicular Neoplasms - complications - drug therapy - pathology
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate blood pressure and body mass index (BMI) in long-term survivors of testicular cancer (TC) treated with different modalities. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One thousand eight hundred fourteen patients treated for unilateral TC in Norway (1980 to 1994) were invited to participate in a follow-up study (1998 to 2002), including measurements of systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and BMI. Of these patients, 1,289 patients (71%) participated in the study. The patients were categorized into four treatment groups: surgery (n = 242), radiotherapy (n = 547), and two chemotherapy groups, cumulative cisplatin dose
PubMed ID
16051950 View in PubMed
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BMI change is associated with fracture incidence, but only in non-smokers. The Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96675
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2010 Jun 12;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-12-2010
Author
T. Wilsgaard
B K Jacobsen
L A Ahmed
R M Joakimsen
J. Størmer
L. Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, 9037, Tromsø, Norway, tom.wilsgaard@uit.no.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2010 Jun 12;
Date
Jun-12-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Few studies have examined the association between body mass index (BMI) change and fracture in a general population. We observed that BMI loss was associated with increased fracture risk in non-smoking men and women, but not in smokers. BMI gain was associated with decreased fracture risk in women. INTRODUCTION: Weight loss has been associated with increased fracture risk, but few studies have included men. The aim of this study was to examine the association between BMI change and fracture risk in both genders. METHODS: A population-based cohort study in Tromsø, Norway, of adults, aged 20 to 54 years in 1979, who participated in two or three health surveys in 1979-1980, 1986-1987, and 1994-1995. Weight and height were measured at each survey. Information about lifestyle was obtained by questionnaires. Poisson regression was used to estimate incidence rates and Cox proportional hazards regression model to assess the association between fracture risk and BMI change. Fractional polynomials were used to accommodate non-linear associations. RESULTS: A total of 5,549 men and 5,428 women participated. There were 1,135 fractures during 10 years of follow-up. Reduction in BMI was associated with increased non-vertebral fracture risk in non-smokers, but not in smokers. The hazard ratio in male and female non-smokers per 10-year BMI decrease of 2 kg/m(2) versus a BMI increase of 1 kg/m(2) was 1.79 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.17-2.75) and 1.60 (95% CI, 1.28-1.99), respectively. The association was not significantly modified by initial BMI or age or by exclusion of subjects with cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, or cancer. In female non-smokers, weight gain was inversely associated with fracture risk. CONCLUSIONS: In a general Norwegian population, reduction in BMI was significantly associated with increased fracture risk in male and female non-smokers, but not in smokers. These findings could not be explained by preexisting disease.
PubMed ID
20549486 View in PubMed
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Cancer patients use of nonproven therapy: a 5-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21837
Source
J Clin Oncol. 1998 Jan;16(1):6-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
T. Risberg
E. Lund
E. Wist
S. Kaasa
T. Wilsgaard
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, and Department of Oncology, University Hospital of Tromsø, Norway. terje.risber@ism.uit.no
Source
J Clin Oncol. 1998 Jan;16(1):6-12
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Complementary Therapies - methods - utilization
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Care Surveys - methods
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Healing
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Norway
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: To investigate the prospective pattern of use of alternative medicine, here called nonproven therapy (NPT), among oncologic patients during a 5-year period, and the relationship between this use and survival, a questionnaire-based follow-up study was performed at the Department of Oncology, University of Tromsø, from 1990 to 1996. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Two-hundred fifty-two patients answered the first questionnaire during the period July 1990 to July 1991. Eligible patients were mailed follow-up questionnaires after 4, 12, 24 and 60 months. A telephone interview performed after the last follow-up questionnaire showed little disagreement with the prospective collected information as regards the number of patients reported as users of NPT (kappa, 0.92). RESULTS: The number of patients who reported ever using NPT in each cross-sectional part of the study varied between 17.4% and 27.3%. However, the estimated cumulative risk of being a user of NPT during the follow-up period was 45%. Seventy-four percent of NPT users in this north Norwegian study population used faith healing or healing by hand (spiritual NPT) alone or in combination with other forms of NPT. The proportion of patients who used spiritual versus nonspiritual forms of NPT was consistent throughout the follow-up period. Women were more often users than men (50% v 31%, P = .002). Patients older than 75 years of age seldomly used NPT. The 5-year observed survival rate was not influenced by the use of NPT. Adjusted for sex, age, and diagnosis, patients with a high educational level had a borderline higher 5-year survival rate than patients with less education (P = .06). CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate that cross-sectionally designed studies will underestimate the number of ever-users of NPT in a cancer patient population. The use of NPT does not influence observed survival among cancer patients seen in north Norway.
Notes
Comment In: J Clin Oncol. 1998 Jan;16(1):1-29440714
PubMed ID
9440716 View in PubMed
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Carotid artery plaque progression and cognitive decline: the Tromsø Study 1994-2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124893
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2012 Oct;19(10):1318-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
K A Arntzen
H. Schirmer
S H Johnsen
T. Wilsgaard
E B Mathiesen
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. kjell.a.arntzen@uit.no
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2012 Oct;19(10):1318-24
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carotid Stenosis - complications - ultrasonography
Cognition
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Abstract
Carotid atherosclerosis is a risk factor for stroke and cognitive decline, but knowledge on how progression of carotid atherosclerosis affects cognitive function in stroke-free individuals is scarce.
In the population-based Tromsø study, we calculated the change in ultrasound-assessed carotid plaque number and total plaque area from baseline (survey 4) to follow-up 7 years later (survey 5) in 4274 middle-aged stroke-free subjects. Cognitive function was assessed at follow-up by the verbal memory test, the digit-symbol coding test, and the tapping test and repeated after an additional 6 years in a subgroup of 2042 subjects (survey 6). Associations between the average of survey 4 and survey 5 plaque scores and the progression of plaque scores and cognitive test scores were assessed in regression analyses adjusted for baseline age, sex, education, depression, and cardiovascular risk factors.
Progression of total plaque area was associated with lower scores in the digit-symbol coding test (multivariable adjusted standardized ß, -0.03; 95% CI, -0.05 to -0.00; P = 0.04) and the tapping test (ß, -0.03; 95% CI, -0.06 to -0.00; P = 0.03). Similar results were seen for progression of plaque number. The average plaque scores were associated with lower scores in all cognitive tests (P-values = 0.01). No association was found between plaque scores and cognitive decline.
The average plaque scores were associated with lower scores in all cognitive tests. Progression of plaque scores was associated with lower scores in the digit-symbol coding test and the tapping test, but not with the verbal memory test or with cognitive decline.
PubMed ID
22537454 View in PubMed
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Coffee consumption and the risk of venous thromboembolism: the Tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134398
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2011 Jul;9(7):1334-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
K F Enga
S K Braekkan
I J Hansen-Krone
T. Wilsgaard
J-B Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. kristin.f.enga@uit.no
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2011 Jul;9(7):1334-9
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Coffee - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Several studies have investigated the association between coffee consumption and cardiovascular disease, but little is known about coffee intake and the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE).
The aim of this prospective cohort study was to investigate the association between coffee consumption and the risk of incident VTE in a general population.
Information about coffee consumption habits was obtained with a self-administered questionnaire in 26, 755 subjects, aged 25-97 years, who participated in the fourth survey of the Tromsø study (1994-1995). Incident VTE events were registered until the end of follow-up, 1 September 2007.
There were 462 incident VTE events (1.60 per 1000 person-years, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.46-1.75) during a median of 12.5 years of follow-up. A daily consumption of three to four cups was borderline associated (hazard ratio [HR] 0.70; 95% CI 0.48-1.02) and a daily consumption of five to six cups (HR 0.67; 95% CI 0.45-0.97) was significantly associated with reduced risk of VTE as compared with coffee abstainers in multivariable analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), smoking status, physical activity, diabetes, history of cardiovascular disease and cancer. Similar risk estimates were found for provoked and unprovoked VTE, and in sex-stratified analyses.
Our findings suggest a possible U-shaped relationship between coffee consumption and VTE, and that moderate coffee consumption may be associated with a reduced risk of VTE. However, more studies are needed to establish whether moderate coffee consumption is inversely associated with the risk of VTE.
PubMed ID
21592303 View in PubMed
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Cognitive function, drusen, and age-related macular degeneration: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107844
Source
Eye (Lond). 2013 Nov;27(11):1281-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
H. Lindekleiv
M G Erke
G. Bertelsen
T. Peto
K A Arntzen
H. Schirmer
T. Wilsgaard
E B Mathiesen
I. Njølstad
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Eye (Lond). 2013 Nov;27(11):1281-7
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Macular Degeneration - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Prospective Studies
Retinal Drusen - physiopathology
Abstract
To examine the cross-sectional relationship between drusen, late age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and cognitive function. METHODS; We included 2149 stroke-free participants from the population-based Tromsø Study in Norway. Retinal photographs were graded for presence of drusen and AMD. Cognitive function was assessed using the verbal memory test (short verbal memory), digit-symbol coding test (processing speed), and the tapping test (psychomotor tempo). We assessed the relationship between drusen, late AMD, and cognitive test scores, adjusted for potential confounders.
Late AMD was associated with decreased performance in the verbal memory test (standardized ß=-0.23, 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.51 to -0.01). Intermediate and large drusen were associated with decreased performance in the digit-symbol coding test (standardized ß=-0.14 and -0.19, 95% CIs: -0.23 to -0.05 and -0.29 to -0.09, respectively). Participants with large drusen were more likely to have test scores in the lowest quartile of the digit-symbol coding test (odds ratio (OR)=1.9, 95% CI: 1.1-3.5) and the tapping test (OR=1.6, 95% CI: 1.0-2.6), but not in the verbal memory test (OR=1.0, 95% CI: 0.6-1.6).
The findings suggest a relationship between drusen deposition and reduced cognitive function. Although the relationships between drusen, late AMD, and the cognitive test results varied in strength and significance across the types of cognitive test, and may partly have been caused by residual confounding, it is not unlikely that a genuine but weaker relationship exists between drusen deposition and cognitive decline.
PubMed ID
23970030 View in PubMed
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Components of the metabolic syndrome in long-term survivors of testicular cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166911
Source
Ann Oncol. 2007 Feb;18(2):241-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
H S Haugnes
N. Aass
S D Fosså
O. Dahl
O. Klepp
E A Wist
J. Svartberg
T. Wilsgaard
R M Bremnes
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. hegesa@fagmed.uit.no
Source
Ann Oncol. 2007 Feb;18(2):241-8
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Combined Modality Therapy
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - etiology
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Survivors
Testicular Neoplasms - complications - mortality - therapy
Time Factors
Abstract
A possible explanation of the excess cardiovascular risk in testicular cancer (TC) survivors is development of metabolic syndrome. The association between metabolic syndrome and TC treatment is examined in long-term survivors.
In a national follow-up study (1998-2002), 1463 TC survivors (diagnosed 1980-1994) participated. Patients >60 years were excluded in the present study, leaving 1135 patients eligible. The patients were divided in four treatment groups: surgery (n = 225); radiotherapy (n = 446) and two chemotherapy groups: cumulative cisplatin dose (Cis) 850 mg (n = 88). A control group consisted of 1150 men from the Tromsø Population Study. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to a modified National Cholesterol Education Program definition.
Both chemotherapy groups had increased odds for metabolic syndrome compared with the surgery group, highest for the Cis >850 group [odds ratio (OR) 2.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-4.7]. Also, the Cis >850 group had increased odds (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.4) for metabolic syndrome compared with the control group. The association between metabolic syndrome and the Cis >850 group was strengthened after adjusting for testosterone, smoking, physical activity, education and family status.
TC survivors treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy have an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome compared with patients treated with other modalities or with controls.
Notes
Comment In: Ann Oncol. 2007 Feb;18(2):211-217229771
PubMed ID
17060482 View in PubMed
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35 records – page 1 of 4.