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Attitudes of patients with breast and prostate cancer toward complementary therapies in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193715
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2001 Aug;24(4):328-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
L. Salmenperä
T. Suominen
S. Lauri
P. Puukka
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2001 Aug;24(4):328-34
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude
Breast Neoplasms - nursing - therapy
Complementary Therapies
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oncology Nursing
Prostatic Neoplasms - nursing - therapy
Abstract
This study aimed to describe the attitudes of patients with breast cancer and those with prostate cancer toward complementary therapies. The data were collected with a postal questionnaire administered to 216 patients with breast cancer (response rate, 55.4%) and 1 90 patients with prostate cancer (response rate, 54.9%) in southern and southwestern Finland. The questionnaire was composed of 44 Likert-type statements, which were analyzed using descriptive statistics, chi2 tests, t tests, and two-way analyses of variance. More than half (54%) of the patients with breast cancer and 45% of the patients with prostate cancer believed that people with cancer may benefit from complementary therapies, although they did not think these therapies actually could cure cancer. More than half of the respondents were dubious about using complementary therapies as long as there was no solid scientific evidence. Most believed that complementary therapies were used because they gave people hope (women, 88%; men, 72%) or "something to cling to" (women, 83%; men, 76%). The respondents believed most in dietary therapies and least in healing. There was much confusion and uncertainty about the professional competencies and expertise of the people who provided complementary therapies. Approximately one fourth of the respondents had spoken to their physician about complementary therapies. Only a few had talked about the matter with nursing staff. About half of the respondents thought that physicians and nurses took a negative attitude toward complementary therapies. In both groups, patients who had talked with their physician about complementary therapies tended to show a more positive attitude.
PubMed ID
11502043 View in PubMed
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Source
J Adv Nurs. 1999 Jun;29(6):1532-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
M. Välimäki
T. Suominen
J. Peate
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1999 Jun;29(6):1532-3
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Finland
HIV Infections - nursing
Humans
Nurses - psychology
Notes
Comment On: J Adv Nurs. 1999 Mar;29(3):770-110210476
PubMed ID
10354250 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer patients' opportunities to participate in their care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224429
Source
Cancer Nurs. 1992 Feb;15(1):68-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
T. Suominen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Cancer Nurs. 1992 Feb;15(1):68-72
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Breast Neoplasms - nursing - psychology - surgery
Female
Finland
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Middle Aged
Patient Participation
Questionnaires
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to analyze the opportunities and willingness of women to take care of themselves after an operation for breast cancer. The expectations and experiences which women had about their clinical supervision and support during their care were studied. The sample group consisted of one-sixth of the approximately 600 women in southwestern Finland who had developed breast cancer in the previous 3 years. A questionnaire was sent to the subjects. Statistical analysis of the data was based on percentage distributions with correlations, cross-tabulation and loglinear models. The patients reported that they were willing to take part in their own care but that, unfortunately, at all levels they received insufficient professional support and information. We concluded that our health care system insufficiently supports patients' recovery.
PubMed ID
1544135 View in PubMed
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Eight new mutations and the expanding phenotype variability in muscular dystrophy caused by ANO5.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126297
Source
Neurology. 2012 Mar 20;78(12):897-903
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2012
Author
S. Penttilä
J. Palmio
T. Suominen
O. Raheem
A. Evilä
N. Muelas Gomez
G. Tasca
L B Waddell
N F Clarke
A. Barboi
P. Hackman
B. Udd
Author Affiliation
Neuromuscular Research Unit, Tampere University and University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. sini.penttila@uta.fi
Source
Neurology. 2012 Mar 20;78(12):897-903
Date
Mar-20-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Blotting, Western
Chloride Channels - genetics
Cohort Studies
Creatine Kinase - blood
DNA - genetics
Female
Finland
Genes, Recessive
Genetic Testing
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle Weakness - etiology
Muscle, Skeletal - pathology
Muscular Dystrophies, Limb-Girdle - diagnosis - genetics - pathology
Mutation - physiology
Phenotype
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Description of 8 new ANO5 mutations and significant expansion of the clinical phenotype spectrum associated with previously known and unknown mutations to improve diagnostic accuracy.
DNA samples of 101 patients in 95 kindreds at our quaternary referral center in Finland, who had undetermined limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD), calf distal myopathy, or creatine kinase (CK) elevations of more than 2,000 IU/L, were selected for ANO5 genetic evaluation, and the clinical findings of patients with mutations were retrospectively analyzed.
A total of 25 patients with muscular dystrophy caused by 11 different recessive mutations in the ANO5 gene were identified. The vast majority of mutations, 8 of 11, proved to be previously unknown new mutations. The most frequent mutation, c.2272C>T (p.R758C), was present in 20 patients. The phenotypes associated with this and the common European mutation, c.191dupA, varied from nearly asymptomatic high hyperCKemia to severe LGMD with consistently milder phenotypes in female patients.
Mutations in ANO5 are a frequent cause of undetermined muscular dystrophy, with both distal and proximal presentation. Other types include high hyperCKemia, myalgia, or calf hypertrophy over decades without significant weakness, especially in female patients. Mutations are distributed all over the gene, indicating that muscular dystrophy caused by ANO5 can be expected to occur in all populations.
Notes
Erratum In: Neurology. 2013 Jan 8;80(2):226
PubMed ID
22402862 View in PubMed
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High frequency of co-segregating CLCN1 mutations among myotonic dystrophy type 2 patients from Finland and Germany.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155087
Source
J Neurol. 2008 Nov;255(11):1731-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
T. Suominen
B. Schoser
O. Raheem
S. Auvinen
M. Walter
R. Krahe
H. Lochmüller
W. Kress
B. Udd
Author Affiliation
University of Tampere, Neurogenetics, 33520 Tampere, Finland.
Source
J Neurol. 2008 Nov;255(11):1731-6
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Chloride Channels - genetics
Female
Finland
Gene Frequency
Germany
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Myotonic Dystrophy - genetics
Phenotype
Abstract
Based on previous reports the frequency of co-segregating recessive chloride channel (CLCN1) mutations in families with myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) was suspected to be increased. We have studied the frequency of CLCN1 mutations in two separate patient and control cohorts from Germany and Finland, and for comparison in a German myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) patient cohort. The frequency of heterozygous recessive chloride channel (CLCN1) mutations is disproportionally higher (5 %) in currently diagnosed DM2 patients compared to 1.6 % in the control population (p = 0.037), while the frequency in DM1 patients was the same as in the controls. Because the two genes segregate independently, the prevalence of CLCN1 mutations in the total DM2 patient population is, by definition, the same as in the control population. Our findings are, however, not based on the total DM2 population but on the currently diagnosed DM2 patients and indicate a selection bias in molecular diagnostic referrals. DM2 patients with co-segregating CLCN1 mutation have an increased likelihood to be referred for molecular diagnostic testing compared to DM2 patients without co-segregating CLCN1 mutation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18807109 View in PubMed
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How do nurses assess the information received by breast cancer patients?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222091
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1993 Jan;18(1):64-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1993
Author
T. Suominen
Author Affiliation
University of Turku, Department of Nursing, Finland.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1993 Jan;18(1):64-8
Date
Jan-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Breast Neoplasms - nursing - radiotherapy
Diffusion of Innovation
Finland
Hospitalization
Humans
Linear Models
Nursing Assessment - standards
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Patient Education as Topic - manpower - methods - standards
Role
Abstract
The aim of the study was to clarify how nurses assess the information targeted at breast cancer patients before, during and after hospitalization. The sample group consisted of 176 nurses from surgical and radiological wards and clinics in southwest Finland. The study used responses to a questionnaire investigating breast cancer patients' recovery. Of the sample, 71% responded to the questionnaire. Log-linear modelling was used for the final statistical analysis of the results. The findings obtained by log-linear modelling showed a cumulative effect. Various associations were seen in the responses of the nurses on how they assessed the information received by patients. Patients who were considered well-informed before hospitalization were similarly considered during their hospital stay. Nurses consider that they give their patients insufficient information. Further, nurses are not clear about their own role in the distribution of information.
PubMed ID
8429169 View in PubMed
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Informed consent for short-stay surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199329
Source
Nurs Ethics. 1999 Nov;6(6):483-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
A M Kanerva
T. Suominen
H. Leino-Kilpi
Author Affiliation
Satakunta Polytechnic Unit of Social Services and Health Care, Rauma, Finland.
Source
Nurs Ethics. 1999 Nov;6(6):483-93
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures - nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Attitude to Health
Comprehension
Consent Forms
Decision Making
Disclosure
Empirical Research
Female
Finland
Humans
Informed Consent - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Competency
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Personal Autonomy
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Abstract
This study in the context of short-stay surgery is based on a definition according to which informed consent consists of five elements: consent, voluntariness, disclosure of information, understanding and competence. The data were collected in four district hospitals in southern Finland by using a structured questionnaire. The population consisted of short-stay and one-day surgery patients (n = 107). Data analysis was based on statistical methods. The results indicated some problems in the realization of informed consent. Most commonly, consent was expressed by voluntary admission. Most patients had indicated their voluntary consent by making their decision independently. There were also certain problems with information. The respondents were least well informed about the drawbacks of anaesthesia and about alternative forms of treatment. The patients had not understood all the information they had received; problems of understanding were greatest with information about the advantages and disadvantages of anaesthesia. Problems were also reported with competence. These patients had the most difficulty in assessing the advantages and drawbacks of different treatments and anaesthesia.
PubMed ID
10696194 View in PubMed
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Motives of cancer patients for using the Internet to seek social support.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117245
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2013 Mar;22(2):261-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
T. Yli-Uotila
A. Rantanen
T. Suominen
Author Affiliation
Nursing Science, School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. tiina.yli-uotila@uta.fi
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2013 Mar;22(2):261-71
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Finland
Health Behavior
Humans
Information Seeking Behavior
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Neoplasms - psychology
Questionnaires
Self-Help Groups
Social Support
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to describe why Finnish cancer patients choose the internet as a source of social support. The data were collected in May 2010, using an online questionnaire with open-ended questions, through four discussion forums on the websites of the non-profit Cancer Society of Finland. Seventy-four adult patients with cancer participated. The data were analysed using inductive content analysis. The mean age of the participants was 53 years and they were predominantly women. The most common cancer was breast cancer and more than three quarters of the participants had suffered from cancer for less than 5 years. The initial stimuli to use the internet as a source of social support were the ease of communication and access to information as well as the need for emotional and informational support. The actual motives that drove the use of the internet as a source of social support were the requirements for information and peer support, internet technology, a lack of support outside the internet and the negative experiences caused by the illness. The fact that there is an enormous need for information as well as for emotional support and that cancer treatment in Finland is concentrated in major hospitals, to which cancer patients may travel a considerable distance, suggests that nurses should learn to make more frequent virtual contact with their patients.
PubMed ID
23320398 View in PubMed
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Myopathies caused by homozygous titin mutations: limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2J and variations of phenotype.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142666
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2010 Nov;81(11):1200-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
I. Pénisson-Besnier
P. Hackman
T. Suominen
J. Sarparanta
S. Huovinen
I. Richard-Crémieux
B. Udd
Author Affiliation
Département de Neurologie, Centre de Référence des Maladies Neuromusculaires, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire d'Angers, 4 rue Larrey, 49933 Angers Cedex 9, France. ispenisson-besnier@chu-angers.fr
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2010 Nov;81(11):1200-2
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Connectin
Fatal Outcome
Female
Finland
France
Homozygote
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle Proteins - chemistry - genetics
Muscular Dystrophies, Limb-Girdle - genetics - physiopathology
Pedigree
Phenotype
Point Mutation
Protein Kinases - chemistry - genetics
Protein Structure, Tertiary
Abstract
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2J caused by mutations in C-terminal titin has so far been identified in Finnish patients only. This may in part be due to limited availability of diagnostic tests for titin defects. In this report, a French family with an autosomal-dominant late-onset distal myopathy of the tibial muscular dystrophy phenotype segregating in several members of the family was described. One deceased patient in the family proved to be homozygous for the C-terminal truncating titin mutation because of consanguinity. According to available medical records, the patient had a clearly more severe generalised muscle weakness and atrophy phenotype not recognised as a distal myopathy at the time. Autopsy findings in one of the original Finnish limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2J patients were reported and the early phenotype in a newly identified young patient with homozygous Finnish C-terminal titin mutation (FINmaj) was detailed.
PubMed ID
20571043 View in PubMed
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Nurses' ethical perceptions about coercion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179189
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2004 Aug;11(4):379-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
M. Lind
R. Kaltiala-Heino
T. Suominen
H. Leino-Kilpi
M. Välimäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, FIN-20014, Finland. maarit.lind@utu.fi
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2004 Aug;11(4):379-85
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Coercion
Ethics, Nursing
Female
Finland
Hospitals, Psychiatric - standards
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role
Nurse-Patient Relations - ethics
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - ethics - psychology
Organizational Culture
Patient Rights - ethics
Psychiatric Nursing - ethics
Statistics, nonparametric
Violence - prevention & control
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe Finnish psychiatric nurses' ethical perceptions about coercive measures in acute psychiatric setting.
The data were collected with a questionnaire developed for this study. The sample included 170 Finnish psychiatric nurses on acute wards in five psychiatric hospitals. The data were analysed using frequency and percentage distributions, mean and standard deviations. The internal consistency of the instrument was explored with Cronbach's alpha. The association between the background variables and the sum score of the items of the questionnaire was tested with Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskal-Wallis test. The open-ended question was analysed with content analysis.
Some psychiatric nurses perceived coercive measures as ethically problematic. In particular, the implementation of forced medication (18%), four-point restraints (16%) and patient seclusion (11%) were perceived as ethically problematic. Female nurses and nurses who worked on closed wards perceived the measures to be more problematic than male nurses and nurses who did not work on closed wards.
In Finland, special attention has been paid to ethical questions related to the care of psychiatric patients and to the enhancement of patients' rights, yet the majority of the nurses participating in the survey did not perceive coercive measures as ethically problematic. More research on this issue as well as further education of the personnel and more extensive teaching of ethics in nursing schools are needed to support the ability of the psychiatric personnel to identify ethically problematic situations. In addition, it is important to consider new measures for generating genuine moral reflection among the personnel on the usage of coercive measures as well as on their effectiveness and legitimacy in the psychiatric care.
PubMed ID
15255910 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.